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Re: [SLOVAK-ROOTS] Husar family

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  • Judy (& Dr. Joe) Quashnock
    Hi Joe, Bernardine has provided you with a number of places. To address your other questions in any detail would take a while. However, you should know that
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 18, 2001
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      Hi Joe,

      Bernardine has provided you with a number of places. To address your other questions in any detail would take a while. However, you should know that "Slovakia" was a country that had quite a broken past. Slovakia existed off and on
      for the past 500 years, but it was under Hungarian rule for over 400 of those years. Then, to complicate the picture, the Austro-Hungarian "dual" monarchy (contradictions such as this DUAL - MONO existed even then) was an arrangement
      of convenience in the 1800's. Slovakia still remained under the rule of Hungary while Austria had charge of the Czech's. So you will see records for your family referring to Austria and Hungary. After WW1 it was Czech - o -
      Slovakia. This arrangement lasted until the beginning of WW2 when it was Slovakia, following WW2, it was Czechoslovakia again, in the 1990's, following the fall of the Berlin wall etc., the velvet revolution took place and the Czech
      Republic and Slovakia were again independent countries. Forgive me if you know this, but your inquiry implied that there was question about Hungary vs Austria. As far as US records go, the US government specified which name was
      applied to to each part of the world at any time; to get some idea of the process visit:


      to see the official descriptions of your heritage, then you can pick any thing you want. For instance, quite a few people filled out last year's census question about "race" as "human" - - - cute but would you want your great great
      great great etc. grand kids to read this in the future?

      Good luck with your search.

      Dr. "Q"

      Bernardine Weigand wrote:

      > There is a "Teplic~ka" in Spis~ska . In 1773, the names were: Tepliczka, Teplicska, Teplitzen; 1786, Teplicschka, Teplitz; 1808, Teplicska, Teplic~ka; 1863-1902, Teplicska; 1907-1913, Hernadtapolca; 1920- Teplic~ka.
      > There is also a Spis~ska Teplica. In 1786, Teplitz; 1808, Teplicz, Teplica; 1863, Teplic; 1873-1902, Szepesteplic; 1907-1913, Szepestapolca; 1920 Teplica; 1927-Spis~ska Teplica
      > There is also another "Teplic~ka nad Vahom" (on the river Vah) near Zilina, in western Slovakia, as well as other "Teplicas" with variations of the spelling in other areas.
      > Do you mean "Poprad"? If so, Poprad is not very far from Teplic~ka. Poprad is in Spis~ska county also. It was called: 1786,Deutschendorf, Poprad; 1808, Poprad, Deutschendorf; 1863-1913, Poprad (accent over the a); 1920- Poprad.
      > These towns/villages (above) were once a part of the Austro-Hungarian empire.
      > I hope this doesn't make things more confusing for you.
      > Bernardine
      > jwjhusar@... wrote:
      > >
      > > I joined this group hoping to find info on my paternal grandmother,but through a
      > > cousins efforts, it has been discovered that mypaternal grandfather is from
      > > Slovakia also. His name was Joseph Andrew Husar and from the SS-5 we learned
      > > hewas born to Josef and Anna Keler in Teplica, Spis Co., Slovakia.1/03/1890. We
      > > also have learned that his older sister, Katherine (b.1869) was first married to
      > > a man named Goverman, with one child(Mary, b. 1/7/1891 in Popard, Austria.) I
      > > formerly believed that gf was born in Tapolca, Hungary. Ourquestions now are:
      > > 1.Was Teplica, Spis. Co., Slovakia, once a part of Hungary?2.Is Popard, Austria
      > > now present day Popard, Slovakia?3. Gf came to the U.S. in 1906, what port may he
      > > have sailed from? Any light that someone could shed would be greatly
      > > appreciated.Thank you. Joe G. Husar
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
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