Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Kochis pronunciation

Expand Messages
  • CasperVeth@aol.com
    Larry: As usual, you are right on target. And thanks to everyone else for chiming in on my pronunciation question. My family name was anglicized to Kochek and
    Message 1 of 10 , May 15, 2011
      Larry:

      As usual, you are right on target. And thanks to everyone else for
      chiming in on my pronunciation question.

      My family name was anglicized to Kochek and I recall my father calling an
      older cousin, "Coachie" so the Coachman theory makes sense. The name was
      anglicized when they arrived in the 1880s, but it appears from what I
      learned on this site that the name at one time was either Kocic or Kocik.

      My family was from the Perth Amboy-Carteret area in Middlesex County, NJ.
      There was a large Austria-Hungary population there. Other names from
      that are Hodorovsky, Portek and Michaelenko (e) and Yurko.

      Ray Veth Middletown, NJ


      In a message dated 5/11/2011 4:00:06 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
      lkocik@... writes:






      Elaine

      I'm impressed with your knowledge of surname origins. My name is
      Kocik/Kocich and has the same root. The suffix on my name is diminutive so it is
      actually a small coach or cart for the meaning of my name.
      I have seen in Slovakia these days that Kocik can also mean a baby
      carriage. I too, have seen the "sis" suffix in Hungarian records, and have found
      Kocsis to mean coachman in Hungarian . Koc was/is a town in Hungary noted
      for it's excellence in coach making. In Polish koc is cat and Kocik, again
      with the diminutive, means kitten.

      Your explaination of the pronouncation is also what I know to be
      true....my variation was pronounced KO-chick or CA-chick by my Slovak ancestors. One
      of my Italian aunts used to tease my dad by calling him

      cut-zick, which I think would be the hated Magyar pronounciation [spelled
      Koczich].

      My ancestors immigrated as Kocich, then changed to Kocik and Kocick. I
      have seen Slovak immigrants with the Kocik name and some have angelized to
      Kochik.

      I used to get very upset with all the spelling variations of my name until
      Martin put it into perspective for me...to paraphrase; it only matters how
      the name is pronounced since slovak was/i s a spoken language...and that
      is a very loose interrputation of what he actually said. H e has a good
      explanation on his P ittsburgh University website.

      Thank you Elaine.

      Larry From: "Elaine" <_epowell@..._
      (mailto:epowell@...) >
      To: _SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com_ (mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com)
      Sent: Wednesday, May 11, 2011 8:05:36 AM
      Subject: Re: [S-R] Re: Kochis pronunciation

      I have seen this name in the towns I've been
      researching in eastern Slovakia. In times
      when records are in Hungarian, this name would
      have been spelled Kocsis, which would be
      pronounced "KO-cheesh" and means "coachman."

      It looks like the spelling you have anglicizes the
      "ch" sound but not the "sh" sound. I believe Ben's
      Slovak word keeps the "ch" sound with č, but I'm
      not sure whether the "sh" at the end is the same.

      Elaine P

      Sent from my iPhone

      On May 11, 2011, at 6:38 AM, Ben Sorensen <_cerrunos1@..._
      (mailto:cerrunos1@...) > wrote:

      > The difference may be masked by the anglicized spelling of Kochis. This
      would be hard to find as a Slovak last name. There are a few with Koc~is
      as a last name, though. In that case, there would be a minimal difference
      in the pronunciation.
      > Ben
      >
      > From: Michael Mojher <_mgmojher@..._
      (mailto:mgmojher@...) >
      > To: _SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com_ (mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com)

      > Sent: Tuesday, May 10, 2011 10:16 PM
      > Subject: Re: [S-R] Re: Kochis pronunciation
      >
      >
      >
      > I would venture to say there is a very different pronunciation. My
      surname Mojher in the USA is said Moi-yer, in Slovakia it is Moi-hair. Each
      letter of the Slovak alphabet has a very different pronunciation than its
      English counterpart.
      >
      > From: _CasperVeth@..._ (mailto:CasperVeth@...)
      > Sent: Tuesday, May 10, 2011 6:42 PM
      > To: _SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com_ (mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com)

      > Subject: Re: [S-R] Re: Kochis pronunciation
      >
      > Is there a difference between Czechoslovokia and America in the way
      Kochis
      > is pronounced?
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.