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Re: [SLOVAK-ROOTS] Was it Rijeka/Fiume-Trieste-Dubrovnik-or a German port ?

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  • Fred Corbett
    My deceaased father in law and mother in law, August Kral and Pavla Smida of Malacky, Pozsony, Slovakia migrated to the USA in 1921. Their route was Malacky to
    Message 1 of 2 , Jan 8, 2001
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      My deceaased father in law and mother in law, August Kral and Pavla Smida
      of Malacky, Pozsony, Slovakia migrated to the USA in 1921. Their route
      was Malacky to Prague for their visas, then train to Rotterdam and then
      the SS Rotterdam to Boston, Mass., USA. The destination of Boston was a
      last minute change. Apparently there was a "flu" epidemic in New York.
      I have a part of the passenger manifest for that voyage. It identifies
      passengers as , - Slovenian, Slovakia, Hungarian, Bohemian.

      Frank Kurchina wrote:

      > Wrote that Slovaks would not have traveled to Dubrovnik, Croatia to
      > emigrate to North America because this port was located 450 miles
      > distant from Slovakia and entailed a long sea voyage.
      >
      > Rijeka is located 260 miles from Dubrovnik.
      > Trieste is located 300 miles from Dubrovnik.
      >
      > After 1904 it may have been another matter.
      >
      > 1867-1918 Istria, including port of Trieste, was part of Austria
      > under the dual Austro-Hungarian Monarchy.
      >
      > Port city of Rijeka (C) Fiume (I) was part of Hungarian Modrus-Fiume
      > Megye (county) under the dual Austro-Hungarian Monarchy.
      >
      > In 1903, Hungary established the most restrictive Emigration Law in
      > the world and tried to funnel all emigrants leaving Hungary via
      > Rijeka/Fiume.
      > The law also enabled the Hungarian government to make a contract with
      > the Cunard Steamship Company for a direct Fiume to New York route.
      >
      > Pre-WW I
      >
      > Migration from Hungary
      > via Rijeka/Fiume
      >
      > 1903 0 emigrants
      > 1904 22016
      > 1905 35961
      > 1906 49332
      > 1907 47620
      > 1908 15411
      > 1909 36824
      > 1910 36834
      > 1911 18532
      > 1912 21922
      > 1913 20847
      >
      > Migration from Hungary
      > via Trieste
      >
      > 1904 0 emigrants
      > 1905 867
      > 1906 3621
      > 1907 6028
      > 1908 1805
      > 1909 4729
      > 1910 4299
      > 1911 2379
      > 1912 3959
      > 1913 4345
    • Frank Kurchina
      ... Smida ... route ... then ... was a ... York. ... identifies ... The new country of Czechoslovakia was created in 1920. In 1920 the Austro-Hungarian
      Message 2 of 2 , Jan 8, 2001
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        --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@egroups.com, Fred Corbett <fhcorbett@e...> wrote:
        > My deceaased father in law and mother in law, August Kral and Pavla
        Smida
        > of Malacky, Pozsony, Slovakia migrated to the USA in 1921. Their
        route
        > was Malacky to Prague for their visas, then train to Rotterdam and
        then
        > the SS Rotterdam to Boston, Mass., USA. The destination of Boston
        was a
        > last minute change. Apparently there was a "flu" epidemic in New
        York.
        > I have a part of the passenger manifest for that voyage. It
        identifies
        > passengers as , - Slovenian, Slovakia, Hungarian, Bohemian.
        >
        > Frank Kurchina wrote:
        >
        > Wrote that Slovaks would not have traveled to Dubrovnik, Croatia
        > to emigrate to North America because this port was located 450
        > miles distant from Slovakia and entailed a long sea voyage.

        The new country of Czechoslovakia was created in 1920.
        In 1920 the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy no longer existed.
        And Hungary had lost two-thirds of its former territory to other
        nations, like Czechoslovakia and Yugoslavia.

        Pozsony was the Hungarian name for Bratislava, Slovakia.
        Malacky is located 20 miles from Bratislava.
        It is 200 miles from Malacky to Praha (Prag)
        Rotterdam is located 450 miles from Praha as the sokol flies.

        [This era's influenza epidemic had killed 25 million people worldwide.
        In one year, 1 million people died just in the U.S.
        In comparison, during 4 years of fighting in WW I , 9 million men had
        been killed on all sides]



        ROTTERDAM (3)

        This "Rotterdam" was the fourth of five vessels with this name owned
        by the Holland America Line. She was built in 1908 by Harland &
        Wolff, Belfast and was a 24,149 gross ton ship, length 650.5ft x beam
        77.4ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 16 knots.
        There was passenger accommodation for 530-1st, 555-2nd and 2,124-3rd
        class. Launched on 3/3/1908, she sailed from Rotterdam on her maiden
        voyage to New York on 13/6/1908.
        She commenced her last voyage on this service on 23/2/1916 and was
        then laid up at Rotterdam (although Holland was a neutral country
        during the Great War, several Dutch ships had been damaged by mines).
        She resumed service between Rotterdam, Brest and New York on 24/1/1919
        and in 1920 was converted to oil fuel.
        In April 1926 her accommodation was altered to carry 1st, 2nd,
        tourist, and 3rd class passengers; in Jan 1930, 1st, tourist and 3rd
        class; in June 1936, cabin, tourist and 3rd; and in May 1937, cabin
        and tourist class.
        On 21/11/1939 she sailed from Rotterdam on her final voyage to New
        York (dep 7/12/1939) and Rotterdam (arr 28/12/1939) and in Jan 1940
        was scrapped at Hendrik Ido, Ambacht.
        [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3,p.913] [Posted to The
        ShipsList by Ted Finch - 9 January 1998]
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