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Decipher marriage record

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  • nilo3rak
    Just posted a photo to 1871 A marriage record, 1871 FedorKubaMarry. I assume that column 10 relates to the publishing of banns. For the first couple,
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 29, 2011
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      Just posted a photo to 1871 A marriage record, 1871 FedorKubaMarry.

      I assume that column 10 relates to the publishing of banns. For the first couple, Fedor/Kuba, what does that column say? I can't make it out.

      Thanks,
      Carolyn
    • CurtB
      Carolyn, It says in Latin: ter promulgati referring to the marriage banns. It means promulgated [announced] three times, the normal announcement of
      Message 2 of 6 , Apr 29, 2011
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        Carolyn,
        It says in Latin: "ter promulgati" referring to the marriage banns. It means promulgated [announced] three times, the normal announcement of marriages ahead of time to see whether an objection was raised.

        Curt B.

        --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "nilo3rak" <eirrac25@...> wrote:
        >
        > Just posted a photo to 1871 A marriage record, 1871 FedorKubaMarry.
        >
        > I assume that column 10 relates to the publishing of banns. For the first couple, Fedor/Kuba, what does that column say? I can't make it out.
        >
        > Thanks,
        > Carolyn
        >
      • nilo3rak
        Thanks Curt, I figured that much out, what I coudn t make out was the specifics about the banns of the Kuba/Fedor marriage. The handwriting is so cramped.
        Message 3 of 6 , Apr 30, 2011
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          Thanks Curt,

          I figured that much out, what I coudn't make out was the specifics about the banns of the Kuba/Fedor marriage. The handwriting is so cramped. Can you make any sense of it?

          What about dispensations, that is, is there a latin phrase to indicate that?
          Carolyn



          --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "CurtB" <curt67boc@...> wrote:
          >
          > Carolyn,
          > It says in Latin: "ter promulgati" referring to the marriage banns. It means promulgated [announced] three times, the normal announcement of marriages ahead of time to see whether an objection was raised.
          >
          > Curt B.
        • CurtB
          Carolyn, Sorry, I read the wrong line. Please give me the reference to the online record you got this from. I cannot read the photograph you supplied. Just
          Message 4 of 6 , Apr 30, 2011
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            Carolyn,
            Sorry, I read the wrong line. Please give me the reference to the online record you got this from. I cannot read the photograph you supplied. Just giving the citation by religion, place, inventory number,and page, allows other readers the ability to manipulate the page and see other examples of the handwriting.

            Curt B.

            --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "nilo3rak" <eirrac25@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            > Thanks Curt,
            >
            > I figured that much out, what I coudn't make out was the specifics about the banns of the Kuba/Fedor marriage. The handwriting is so cramped. Can you make any sense of it?
            >
            > What about dispensations, that is, is there a latin phrase to indicate that?
            > Carolyn
            >
            >
            >
            > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "CurtB" <curt67boc@> wrote:
            > >
            > > Carolyn,
            > > It says in Latin: "ter promulgati" referring to the marriage banns. It means promulgated [announced] three times, the normal announcement of marriages ahead of time to see whether an objection was raised.
            > >
            > > Curt B.
            >
          • CurtB
            Carolyn, This is the phrase the priest uses to indicate a dispensation from announcing marriage banns. Apparently not difficult since it is often found. The
            Message 5 of 6 , Apr 30, 2011
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              Carolyn,
              This is the phrase the priest uses to indicate a dispensation from announcing marriage banns. Apparently not difficult since it is often found. The priest uses the phrase or a similar one down later on the page. If you post the citation of the record this is from, I can see better examples and manipulate it and probably figure out the second word, and date in February. The Latin word for dispensation is "dispensatio", from whence we get the English word. The last word in this entry is the past participle "dispensati" meaning dispensed. The handwriting is not particularly good.

              This record translates partially as "By (???ationibus) the most Reverend Bishop on the (?17?)th day of February [banns] dispensed.

              Curt B.

              --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "nilo3rak" <eirrac25@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              > Thanks Curt,
              >
              > I figured that much out, what I coudn't make out was the specifics about the banns of the Kuba/Fedor marriage. The handwriting is so cramped. Can you make any sense of it?
              >
              > What about dispensations, that is, is there a latin phrase to indicate that?
              > Carolyn
              >
              >
              >
              > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "CurtB" <curt67boc@> wrote:
              > >
              > > Carolyn,
              > > It says in Latin: "ter promulgati" referring to the marriage banns. It means promulgated [announced] three times, the normal announcement of marriages ahead of time to see whether an objection was raised.
              > >
              > > Curt B.
              >
            • nilo3rak
              Curt, I knew you could figure it out - a general sense of the entry is good enough for me. Thanks, Carolyn
              Message 6 of 6 , May 1 5:41 AM
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                Curt,

                I knew you could figure it out - a general sense of the entry is good enough for me.
                Thanks,
                Carolyn


                --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "CurtB" <curt67boc@...> wrote:
                >
                > Carolyn,
                > This is the phrase the priest uses to indicate a dispensation from announcing marriage banns. Apparently not difficult since it is often found. The priest uses the phrase or a similar one down later on the page. If you post the citation of the record this is from, I can see better examples and manipulate it and probably figure out the second word, and date in February. The Latin word for dispensation is "dispensatio", from whence we get the English word. The last word in this entry is the past participle "dispensati" meaning dispensed. The handwriting is not particularly good.
                >
                > This record translates partially as "By (???ationibus) the most Reverend Bishop on the (?17?)th day of February [banns] dispensed.
                >
                > Curt B.
                >
                > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "nilo3rak" <eirrac25@> wrote:
                > >
                > >
                > > Thanks Curt,
                > >
                > > I figured that much out, what I coudn't make out was the specifics about the banns of the Kuba/Fedor marriage. The handwriting is so cramped. Can you make any sense of it?
                > >
                > > What about dispensations, that is, is there a latin phrase to indicate that?
                > > Carolyn
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "CurtB" <curt67boc@> wrote:
                > > >
                > > > Carolyn,
                > > > It says in Latin: "ter promulgati" referring to the marriage banns. It means promulgated [announced] three times, the normal announcement of marriages ahead of time to see whether an objection was raised.
                > > >
                > > > Curt B.
                > >
                >
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