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Slavic/Ruthenian migrations via Galicia

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  • nilo3rak
    Hi Ron, To reply I am starting a new thread apart from papal beatification. You bring up lots of points. Since each is a major, continuing, research project,
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 25, 2011
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      Hi Ron,
      To reply I am starting a new thread apart from papal beatification.

      You bring up lots of points. Since each is a major, continuing, research project, I'll address each separately beginning with Slavic/Ruthenian migration from Galicia.

      I was struck by the numbers of Poles, Germans, and Ruthenian names as I investigated my paternal female ancestors starting from the now Polish/Slovak border area of the Poprad river, through a southwesterly valley to the Torysa River, down river to Szent Mihaly, and on to Radoma and Breznica. This line seemed to be inexoribly marching back east to its roots based on genetics. Through my father's full genetic sequence mtDNa, haplogroup H2a, we have a complete match,( wow! )living now in Russia, and her grandmother came from the present day Ukraine. I think I would bet this branch of my family came from there, too,

      In Breznica my grandmother married a man whose roots seem to come from the Sobrance/Uhzhorod area. The original name can be claimed by the Ruthenians. That branch of the family probably came through the mountain pass there.

      Looking at the geography and topography of the are, I concluded that Grandmother's ancestors used the Poprad River valley as a gateway from southern Poland/Galicia on the north to Slovakia/Upper Hungary on the south. That means that somehow they traveled from the now western Ukraine or Belarus, probably across southern Poland. I have already found one family member, GC Ruthenian, in Galica. No doubt when I continue researching in Poland, I will find more. (Note: when I research in Poland the names are associated with being Polish.) Time and lots of work may find a definite route of their passage.

      Map of Galicia at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Galicia.jpg

      There are many mountain passes and river valleys that cut through the Carpathians, I do not think and have not suggested that the Poprad River was the only one. Consider that in the centuries of Slavic migration from their homeland, generally agreed to be between the Dniester and Dnieper rivers in present day Ukraine, they moved westerly and northerly. Generally speaking, Poland is an unbroken plain reaching from the Baltic Sea in the north to the Carpathian Mountains in the south. Indeed, a region of plains extends to the Sudeten (Sidetu) Mountains on the Czech and Slovak borders to the southwest and to the Carpathians on the Czech, Slovak, and Ukrainian borders to the southeast. Traversing a plain is the path of least resistance used equally by migrating peoples and military forces. Whatever the motive, people moved from this plain often moved south, through passes and river cuts. (In northern Zemplen I have found members of my mother's maternal family from Galicia. No doubt they were migrant workers, and probably entered through Dukla Pass . Their name is claimed by the Poles and the Lemkos.)

      In conclusion, I add this citation from Encyclopedia of Rusyn history and culture By Paul R. Magocsi, Ivan Ivanovich Pop

      "…Slavs from the north (Galicia) and east . . . continued to settle in small numbers in various parts of the Carpathian borderland. These new settlers from the north and east, like the Slavs already living in Carpathian Rus, had by the eleventh century come to be known as Rus' . . . .
      "Rusyn migration from the north and east, in particular from Galicia, continued until the sixteenth century and even later." P.186

      I am delighted he agrees with me. lol
      Carolyn
    • Kathy Smith
      Can you give an example of a Ruthenian surname? From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of nilo3rak Sent: Monday,
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 25, 2011
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        Can you give an example of a Ruthenian surname?



        From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com] On
        Behalf Of nilo3rak
        Sent: Monday, April 25, 2011 12:47 PM
        To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [S-R] Slavic/Ruthenian migrations via Galicia





        Hi Ron,
        To reply I am starting a new thread apart from papal beatification.

        You bring up lots of points. Since each is a major, continuing, research
        project, I'll address each separately beginning with Slavic/Ruthenian
        migration from Galicia.

        I was struck by the numbers of Poles, Germans, and Ruthenian names as I
        investigated my paternal female ancestors starting from the now
        Polish/Slovak border area of the Poprad river, through a southwesterly
        valley to the Torysa River, down river to Szent Mihaly, and on to Radoma and
        Breznica. This line seemed to be inexoribly marching back east to its roots
        based on genetics. Through my father's full genetic sequence mtDNa,
        haplogroup H2a, we have a complete match,( wow! )living now in Russia, and
        her grandmother came from the present day Ukraine. I think I would bet this
        branch of my family came from there, too,

        In Breznica my grandmother married a man whose roots seem to come from the
        Sobrance/Uhzhorod area. The original name can be claimed by the Ruthenians.
        That branch of the family probably came through the mountain pass there.

        Looking at the geography and topography of the are, I concluded that
        Grandmother's ancestors used the Poprad River valley as a gateway from
        southern Poland/Galicia on the north to Slovakia/Upper Hungary on the south.
        That means that somehow they traveled from the now western Ukraine or
        Belarus, probably across southern Poland. I have already found one family
        member, GC Ruthenian, in Galica. No doubt when I continue researching in
        Poland, I will find more. (Note: when I research in Poland the names are
        associated with being Polish.) Time and lots of work may find a definite
        route of their passage.

        Map of Galicia at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Galicia.jpg

        There are many mountain passes and river valleys that cut through the
        Carpathians, I do not think and have not suggested that the Poprad River was
        the only one. Consider that in the centuries of Slavic migration from their
        homeland, generally agreed to be between the Dniester and Dnieper rivers in
        present day Ukraine, they moved westerly and northerly. Generally speaking,
        Poland is an unbroken plain reaching from the Baltic Sea in the north to the
        Carpathian Mountains in the south. Indeed, a region of plains extends to the
        Sudeten (Sidetu) Mountains on the Czech and Slovak borders to the southwest
        and to the Carpathians on the Czech, Slovak, and Ukrainian borders to the
        southeast. Traversing a plain is the path of least resistance used equally
        by migrating peoples and military forces. Whatever the motive, people moved
        from this plain often moved south, through passes and river cuts. (In
        northern Zemplen I have found members of my mother's maternal family from
        Galicia. No doubt they were migrant workers, and probably entered through
        Dukla Pass . Their name is claimed by the Poles and the Lemkos.)

        In conclusion, I add this citation from Encyclopedia of Rusyn history and
        culture By Paul R. Magocsi, Ivan Ivanovich Pop

        ".Slavs from the north (Galicia) and east . . . continued to settle in small
        numbers in various parts of the Carpathian borderland. These new settlers
        from the north and east, like the Slavs already living in Carpathian Rus,
        had by the eleventh century come to be known as Rus' . . . .
        "Rusyn migration from the north and east, in particular from Galicia,
        continued until the sixteenth century and even later." P.186

        I am delighted he agrees with me. lol
        Carolyn





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • nilo3rak
        Hi Kathy, Here s one: Taras a common Ruthenian/Ukrainian name, also found in Galicia. Hungarian variant is Tarasz. Other variants, Tarasovits, Taraszovits.
        Message 3 of 4 , Apr 25, 2011
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          Hi Kathy,
          Here's one: Taras a common Ruthenian/Ukrainian name, also found in Galicia.
          Hungarian variant is Tarasz.

          Other variants, Tarasovits, Taraszovits.

          Another name is Fedor, variant Fedoriv.

          Others on this forum could probably offer many, many more.

          Do you have a particular name to consider?
          Carolyn




          --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "Kathy Smith" <ksmith17@...> wrote:
          >
          > Can you give an example of a Ruthenian surname?
          >
          >
          >

          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • CurtB
          Just take a look at the Carpatho-Rusyn surname listing on the web and you ll see lots of them...and the villages of family origin.
          Message 4 of 4 , Apr 25, 2011
          • 0 Attachment
            Just take a look at the Carpatho-Rusyn surname listing on the web and you'll see lots of them...and the villages of family origin.

            http://www.rusyn.com/crslalpha.htm

            Curt B.



            --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "Kathy Smith" <ksmith17@...> wrote:
            >
            > Can you give an example of a Ruthenian surname?
            >
            >
            >
            > From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com] On
            > Behalf Of nilo3rak
            > Sent: Monday, April 25, 2011 12:47 PM
            > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
            > Subject: [S-R] Slavic/Ruthenian migrations via Galicia
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Hi Ron,
            > To reply I am starting a new thread apart from papal beatification.
            >
            > You bring up lots of points. Since each is a major, continuing, research
            > project, I'll address each separately beginning with Slavic/Ruthenian
            > migration from Galicia.
            >
            > I was struck by the numbers of Poles, Germans, and Ruthenian names as I
            > investigated my paternal female ancestors starting from the now
            > Polish/Slovak border area of the Poprad river, through a southwesterly
            > valley to the Torysa River, down river to Szent Mihaly, and on to Radoma and
            > Breznica. This line seemed to be inexoribly marching back east to its roots
            > based on genetics. Through my father's full genetic sequence mtDNa,
            > haplogroup H2a, we have a complete match,( wow! )living now in Russia, and
            > her grandmother came from the present day Ukraine. I think I would bet this
            > branch of my family came from there, too,
            >
            > In Breznica my grandmother married a man whose roots seem to come from the
            > Sobrance/Uhzhorod area. The original name can be claimed by the Ruthenians.
            > That branch of the family probably came through the mountain pass there.
            >
            > Looking at the geography and topography of the are, I concluded that
            > Grandmother's ancestors used the Poprad River valley as a gateway from
            > southern Poland/Galicia on the north to Slovakia/Upper Hungary on the south.
            > That means that somehow they traveled from the now western Ukraine or
            > Belarus, probably across southern Poland. I have already found one family
            > member, GC Ruthenian, in Galica. No doubt when I continue researching in
            > Poland, I will find more. (Note: when I research in Poland the names are
            > associated with being Polish.) Time and lots of work may find a definite
            > route of their passage.
            >
            > Map of Galicia at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Galicia.jpg
            >
            > There are many mountain passes and river valleys that cut through the
            > Carpathians, I do not think and have not suggested that the Poprad River was
            > the only one. Consider that in the centuries of Slavic migration from their
            > homeland, generally agreed to be between the Dniester and Dnieper rivers in
            > present day Ukraine, they moved westerly and northerly. Generally speaking,
            > Poland is an unbroken plain reaching from the Baltic Sea in the north to the
            > Carpathian Mountains in the south. Indeed, a region of plains extends to the
            > Sudeten (Sidetu) Mountains on the Czech and Slovak borders to the southwest
            > and to the Carpathians on the Czech, Slovak, and Ukrainian borders to the
            > southeast. Traversing a plain is the path of least resistance used equally
            > by migrating peoples and military forces. Whatever the motive, people moved
            > from this plain often moved south, through passes and river cuts. (In
            > northern Zemplen I have found members of my mother's maternal family from
            > Galicia. No doubt they were migrant workers, and probably entered through
            > Dukla Pass . Their name is claimed by the Poles and the Lemkos.)
            >
            > In conclusion, I add this citation from Encyclopedia of Rusyn history and
            > culture By Paul R. Magocsi, Ivan Ivanovich Pop
            >
            > ".Slavs from the north (Galicia) and east . . . continued to settle in small
            > numbers in various parts of the Carpathian borderland. These new settlers
            > from the north and east, like the Slavs already living in Carpathian Rus,
            > had by the eleventh century come to be known as Rus' . . . .
            > "Rusyn migration from the north and east, in particular from Galicia,
            > continued until the sixteenth century and even later." P.186
            >
            > I am delighted he agrees with me. lol
            > Carolyn
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
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