Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [S-R] MIHALEK - TURJA REMETE, CZECHOSLOVAKIA

Expand Messages
  • Michael Mojher
    Linda, I presume that it is your families’ entry and to the present that you can document. What you would like is to view or have someone get the family
    Message 1 of 8 , Apr 10, 2011
      Linda,
      I presume that it is your families’ entry and to the present that you can document. What you would like is to view or have someone get the family records from Turi Remete. And that would be the Mihalek and Feht families.
      I thought you would like to see a 1910 Map of “Ung Megye” (Ung County), Hungary. http://lazarus.elte.hu/hun/maps/1910/ung.jpg The county is divided up into “jaras”. Perecsenyi jaras is the “rose” colored one. The 45 parallel goes through it. “Turjarmete” can be found just below the “se” in Perecsenyi. What this means is your ancestral village was once in the Hungarian Empire, then the Austro-Hungarian Empire, then Czechoslovakia after WW I and the Ukraine after WW II. At the time of your grandfather’s immigration it was in a Slovak cultural area.
      http://genforum.genealogy.com/ukraine/ This is a Ukraine Genealogy Forum. They may give you some information of obtaining records there.


      From: Linda
      Sent: Sunday, April 10, 2011 10:24 AM
      To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [S-R] MIHALEK - TURJA REMETE, CZECHOSLOVAKIA


      Thanks Michael - I've been in contact with the Mills family previously, and I think they got a lot of their information from me. The 1920 Census record is highly suspect. I think it may have been filled in by a neighbor or other family member who was estimating. It has the years of immigration of my grandfather wrong (I have his Ellis Island record), and, of course, the spelling of the last name is all messed up (I realize this was common, as people who spoke little English could hardly be expected to spell correctly in a foreign language). I think my grandmother's given name was actually Augustine (with a birthday of August 1st, this is understandable). I've found another very sketchy/screwy record from Ellis Island which I think may be her, but I can't be sure. I can't find a record for her coming in 1902.

      Linda

      --- In mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com, "Michael Mojher" <mgmojher@...> wrote:
      >
      > Linda,
      > You are correct about Turja Remete being in the Ukraine. It is now spelled Turi Remety . Here is a link to a map and some information - http://www.fallingrain.com/world/UP/25/Turi_Remety.html
      > Unfortunately, getting genealogical information in the Ukraine is not easy. It usually requires hiring a professional.
      > I went to Ancestry.com and within a Mills Family Tree was a Gustina Mihelik who had your listed birthdate, parents and spouse. It said from the 1920 Census she arrived in 1902 at age 6. The family tree is registered to a btvilale1. If you like I can make contact with the site owner for you.
      >





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Linda
      Thanks so much. The map is definitely cool, as are the other links to check out. I ve done a lot of work in Ancestry.com. They have a lot on my father s
      Message 2 of 8 , Apr 10, 2011
        Thanks so much. The map is definitely cool, as are the other links to check out. I've done a lot of work in Ancestry.com. They have a lot on my father's side of the family and I can trace my maternal grandfather back to his immigration. Beyond that, the trail is cold. I do hope to make the trip back over in the future along with my cousins. It would be good to do some local investigating.

        I really appreciate the tips!
        Linda

        --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "Michael Mojher" <mgmojher@...> wrote:
        >
        > Linda,
        > I presume that it is your families’ entry and to the present that you can document. What you would like is to view or have someone get the family records from Turi Remete. And that would be the Mihalek and Feht families.
        > I thought you would like to see a 1910 Map of “Ung Megye” (Ung County), Hungary. http://lazarus.elte.hu/hun/maps/1910/ung.jpg The county is divided up into “jaras”. Perecsenyi jaras is the “rose” colored one. The 45 parallel goes through it. “Turjarmete” can be found just below the “se” in Perecsenyi. What this means is your ancestral village was once in the Hungarian Empire, then the Austro-Hungarian Empire, then Czechoslovakia after WW I and the Ukraine after WW II. At the time of your grandfather’s immigration it was in a Slovak cultural area.
        > http://genforum.genealogy.com/ukraine/ This is a Ukraine Genealogy Forum. They may give you some information of obtaining records there.
      • Michael Mojher
        Linda, If by, “I do hope to make a trip back over in the future ...” you mean going to the Ukraine then I suggest that you do some preliminary research. I
        Message 3 of 8 , Apr 10, 2011
          Linda,
          If by, “I do hope to make a trip back over in the future ...” you mean going to the Ukraine then I suggest that you do some preliminary research. I have made six trips to Slovakia and discovered it was far easier to do record searches here than there. And Slovakia is know for having wonderful archives to search through.
          The problem is time. How much time are you willing to devote to records searches. If it is as simple as going to the village city hall and church you may have a chance of finding something. But it is worth while writing to see if the records do exist. During WW II this area had many battles and you need to discover if the records survived. Then you should try to make an appointment to see the records. Arriving “cold” and you may find there is no one around to get the records out. Even if you have a chance to look at the records I doubt you are going to have the time to try and create much of a family tree into the past. That takes a lot of page looking. If you have had to look through any records you know what I mean.
          If you are fortunate enough you may still have family living in the village. From experience, I was happily side-tracked chasing down my living genealogy more than my dead when I visited Slovakia. If you can do that then your genealogy “come to life” literally and figuratively.
          Certainly, the village you would visit today would be very different from the one of your ancestors. A lot has changed in 120 years. Especially, during the past 60 years. Where Slovak may have once been the primary language, now it is more likely Ukrainian. Both being a Slavic language they do share a lot. The village for 40 of those years was under Soviet rule. Which means not much in the way of infrastructure was improved. My Mother went to Slovakia in the ‘70’s and she warned us before our first trip we were going to a “third-world country”. When we got there we saw it was in some ways better off than here.
          If you are interested in more on traveling write me personally since it is not a genealogy subject.
          Michael Mojher, mgmojher@...

          From: Linda
          Sent: Sunday, April 10, 2011 12:14 PM
          To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [S-R] MIHALEK - TURJA REMETE, CZECHOSLOVAKIA


          Thanks so much. The map is definitely cool, as are the other links to check out. I've done a lot of work in Ancestry.com. They have a lot on my father's side of the family and I can trace my maternal grandfather back to his immigration. Beyond that, the trail is cold. I do hope to make the trip back over in the future along with my cousins. It would be good to do some local investigating.

          I really appreciate the tips!
          Linda

          --- In mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com, "Michael Mojher" <mgmojher@...> wrote:
          >
          > Linda,
          > I presume that it is your families’ entry and to the present that you can document. What you would like is to view or have someone get the family records from Turi Remete. And that would be the Mihalek and Feht families.
          > I thought you would like to see a 1910 Map of “Ung Megye” (Ung County), Hungary. http://lazarus.elte.hu/hun/maps/1910/ung.jpg The county is divided up into “jaras”. Perecsenyi jaras is the “rose” colored one. The 45 parallel goes through it. “Turjarmete” can be found just below the “se” in Perecsenyi. What this means is your ancestral village was once in the Hungarian Empire, then the Austro-Hungarian Empire, then Czechoslovakia after WW I and the Ukraine after WW II. At the time of your grandfather’s immigration it was in a Slovak cultural area.
          > http://genforum.genealogy.com/ukraine/ This is a Ukraine Genealogy Forum. They may give you some information of obtaining records there.





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Frank R Plichta
          Linda et al, I agree with Michael’s suggestions 100%. On my first trip to Slovakia in 1984 I went to meet relatives still living on both my paternal and
          Message 4 of 8 , Apr 10, 2011
            Linda et al,



            I agree with Michael’s suggestions 100%.



            On my first trip to Slovakia in 1984 I went to meet relatives still living
            on both my paternal and maternal sides of the family. It was good to
            connect with them. It was that trip that got me interested in documenting
            the families. So I started by researching records here in the states.



            Then in 1996 I returned for three weeks to specifically go to various Slovak
            and Austrian archives to see the actual documents that I had already seen on
            microfilm. It expedited my search because I already knew the dates and I
            could go directly to the original entries in the ledger books at each of the
            archives. I also spent time with the priests in the local churchs to
            document the more recent family members, some of whom accompanied me to the
            Church and gave permission to share the information with me.



            Since I am doing a worldwide search for my surname, along the way I
            collected a long list of places (in Slovakia, Czech, Hungary and Austria) to
            visit that had a PLICHTA connection, some as early as 1022 and others around
            1450. There is no way of making any connection to those as family ancestors
            but it gave me much detail about other folks with the same surname. The
            surname by the way is relatively rare since I have only found a little more
            than 450 in the United States and about another 600 worldwide excluding
            Poland. The 1990 census lists 5,000 in Poland.



            I visited one village in the Czech Republic, where according to the town
            mayor and town historian, no Plichta had been there since the mid 1450’s. I
            told them when they updated their village history that they should include
            that Frank Plichta visited there in 2006.



            Knowing as much as you are able to find before your trip might make you
            think that there is no need to go. But it really brought everything
            together to know who, when and where was made that much more meaningful and
            I could enjoy the atmosphere, walk the streets, eat in the restaurants and
            visit the families. Visiting the archives where the original records are
            kept and holding them in your hands and smelling the smells coming from the
            books made the visit that much more enjoyable. I even took a scanner with
            me and in 1996 at least, they allowed me to scan the original ledger books.
            Having an original scan was much more meaningful to me that having just the
            microfilm prints from the FHC’s.



            Prepare for your trip by doing all that you can before you go.



            Oh, yes, there is one more lesson learned. Find out what the national
            holidays are in the country you are visiting.



            When I went to Hungary in 2006 I arrived on March 14th and expected to spend
            the entire day of the 15th at the Budapest archives. I found out that
            morning when I went to the banks to exchange some money that the banks were
            closed. The 15th of March is a national holiday, Revolution Day and the war
            of independence against the Austrian-Habsburg rule in 1848-1849. Most of
            the shops were closed and yes the archives were closed. I had to meet some
            relative in Slovakia the next evening on the 16th and I wasn’t able to
            contact them or stay a day longer in Budapest. But I did enjoy the parades,
            the folk music and dancing and the food in the parks. A very special day in
            every other way.



            Do the research and then enjoy the trip.

            Frank Plichta

            “Searching the World for PLICHTAs”



            _____

            From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com] On
            Behalf Of Michael Mojher
            Sent: Sunday, April 10, 2011 6:08 PM
            To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [S-R] MIHALEK - TURJA REMETE, CZECHOSLOVAKIA





            Linda,
            If by, “I do hope to make a trip back over in the future ...” you mean going
            to the Ukraine then I suggest that you do some preliminary research. I have
            made six trips to Slovakia and discovered it was far easier to do record
            searches here than there. And Slovakia is know for having wonderful archives
            to search through.
            The problem is time. How much time are you willing to devote to records
            searches. If it is as simple as going to the village city hall and church
            you may have a chance of finding something. But it is worth while writing to
            see if the records do exist. During WW II this area had many battles and you
            need to discover if the records survived. Then you should try to make an
            appointment to see the records. Arriving “cold” and you may find there is no
            one around to get the records out. Even if you have a chance to look at the
            records I doubt you are going to have the time to try and create much of a
            family tree into the past. That takes a lot of page looking. If you have had
            to look through any records you know what I mean.
            If you are fortunate enough you may still have family living in the village.
            From experience, I was happily side-tracked chasing down my living genealogy
            more than my dead when I visited Slovakia. If you can do that then your
            genealogy “come to life” literally and figuratively.
            Certainly, the village you would visit today would be very different from
            the one of your ancestors. A lot has changed in 120 years. Especially,
            during the past 60 years. Where Slovak may have once been the primary
            language, now it is more likely Ukrainian. Both being a Slavic language they
            do share a lot. The village for 40 of those years was under Soviet rule.
            Which means not much in the way of infrastructure was improved. My Mother
            went to Slovakia in the ‘70’s and she warned us before our first trip we
            were going to a “third-world country”. When we got there we saw it was in
            some ways better off than here.
            If you are interested in more on traveling write me personally since it is
            not a genealogy subject.
            Michael Mojher, mgmojher@... <mailto:mgmojher%40comcast.net>

            From: Linda
            Sent: Sunday, April 10, 2011 12:14 PM
            To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com>
            Subject: Re: [S-R] MIHALEK - TURJA REMETE, CZECHOSLOVAKIA

            Thanks so much. The map is definitely cool, as are the other links to check
            out. I've done a lot of work in Ancestry.com. They have a lot on my father's
            side of the family and I can trace my maternal grandfather back to his
            immigration. Beyond that, the trail is cold. I do hope to make the trip back
            over in the future along with my cousins. It would be good to do some local
            investigating.

            I really appreciate the tips!
            Linda

            --- In mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com, "Michael Mojher"
            <mgmojher@...> wrote:
            >
            > Linda,
            > I presume that it is your families’ entry and to the present that you
            can document. What you would like is to view or have someone get the family
            records from Turi Remete. And that would be the Mihalek and Feht families.
            > I thought you would like to see a 1910 Map of “Ung Megye” (Ung
            County), Hungary. http://lazarus.elte.hu/hun/maps/1910/ung.jpg The county is
            divided up into “jaras”. Perecsenyi jaras is the “rose” colored one.
            The 45 parallel goes through it. “Turjarmete” can be found just below
            the “se” in Perecsenyi. What this means is your ancestral village was
            once in the Hungarian Empire, then the Austro-Hungarian Empire, then
            Czechoslovakia after WW I and the Ukraine after WW II. At the time of your
            grandfather’s immigration it was in a Slovak cultural area.
            > http://genforum.genealogy.com/ukraine/ This is a Ukraine Genealogy Forum.
            They may give you some information of obtaining records there.

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Linda
            Thanks - All very logical suggestions. I don t suppose I would go anywhere without doing a little research first. Actually, that is what I am doing right
            Message 5 of 8 , Apr 10, 2011
              Thanks - All very logical suggestions. I don't suppose I would go anywhere without doing a little research first. Actually, that is what I am doing right now. I imagine it will be a few years before we make plans to go. I'm recently retired and one of my cousins is still working, so we'd have to make sure we had plenty of travel times. And, in this day and age, it would be very wise to research the political and social situations in any area one wants to visit. I do believe there are a few relatives remaining in the area, and it would be wonderful to meet them.

              --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "Frank R Plichta" <frank.r.plichta@...> wrote:
              >
              > Linda et al,
              >
              >
              >
              > I agree with Michael's suggestions 100%.
              >
              >
              >
              > On my first trip to Slovakia in 1984 I went to meet relatives still living
              > on both my paternal and maternal sides of the family. It was good to
              > connect with them. It was that trip that got me interested in documenting
              > the families. So I started by researching records here in the states.
              >
              >
              >
              > Then in 1996 I returned for three weeks to specifically go to various Slovak
              > and Austrian archives to see the actual documents that I had already seen on
              > microfilm. It expedited my search because I already knew the dates and I
              > could go directly to the original entries in the ledger books at each of the
              > archives. I also spent time with the priests in the local churchs to
              > document the more recent family members, some of whom accompanied me to the
              > Church and gave permission to share the information with me.
              >
              >
              >
              > Since I am doing a worldwide search for my surname, along the way I
              > collected a long list of places (in Slovakia, Czech, Hungary and Austria) to
              > visit that had a PLICHTA connection, some as early as 1022 and others around
              > 1450. There is no way of making any connection to those as family ancestors
              > but it gave me much detail about other folks with the same surname. The
              > surname by the way is relatively rare since I have only found a little more
              > than 450 in the United States and about another 600 worldwide excluding
              > Poland. The 1990 census lists 5,000 in Poland.
              >
              >
              >
              > I visited one village in the Czech Republic, where according to the town
              > mayor and town historian, no Plichta had been there since the mid 1450's. I
              > told them when they updated their village history that they should include
              > that Frank Plichta visited there in 2006.
              >
              >
              >
              > Knowing as much as you are able to find before your trip might make you
              > think that there is no need to go. But it really brought everything
              > together to know who, when and where was made that much more meaningful and
              > I could enjoy the atmosphere, walk the streets, eat in the restaurants and
              > visit the families. Visiting the archives where the original records are
              > kept and holding them in your hands and smelling the smells coming from the
              > books made the visit that much more enjoyable. I even took a scanner with
              > me and in 1996 at least, they allowed me to scan the original ledger books.
              > Having an original scan was much more meaningful to me that having just the
              > microfilm prints from the FHC's.
              >
              >
              >
              > Prepare for your trip by doing all that you can before you go.
              >
              >
              >
              > Oh, yes, there is one more lesson learned. Find out what the national
              > holidays are in the country you are visiting.
              >
              >
              >
              > When I went to Hungary in 2006 I arrived on March 14th and expected to spend
              > the entire day of the 15th at the Budapest archives. I found out that
              > morning when I went to the banks to exchange some money that the banks were
              > closed. The 15th of March is a national holiday, Revolution Day and the war
              > of independence against the Austrian-Habsburg rule in 1848-1849. Most of
              > the shops were closed and yes the archives were closed. I had to meet some
              > relative in Slovakia the next evening on the 16th and I wasn't able to
              > contact them or stay a day longer in Budapest. But I did enjoy the parades,
              > the folk music and dancing and the food in the parks. A very special day in
              > every other way.
              >
              >
              >
              > Do the research and then enjoy the trip.
              >
              > Frank Plichta
              >
              > "Searching the World for PLICHTAs"
              >
              >
              >
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.