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Mortality data blacksmiths

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  • nilo3rak
    I am looking for a general trend - or lack of it - in the population of our ancestors who were blacksmiths. If you know the age at death of any and all
    Message 1 of 4 , Mar 9 8:38 AM
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      I am looking for a general trend - or lack of it - in the population of our ancestors who were blacksmiths.

      If you know the age at death of any and all blacksmiths in your family tree and could share it, please send to me.

      In order not to clog this forum with an off topic, you can use my email address -
      jkovalo at earthlink.net. This mailbox's Spam blocker will ask you to request my permission, please do.

      Thanks,
      Carolyn
    • lkocik@comcast.net
       Carolyn  I just sent an email to your personal address .  I had an after thought and am repliing here since it is of a more general interest. Besides I
      Message 2 of 4 , Mar 9 1:36 PM
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         Carolyn

         I just sent an email to your personal address .

         I had an after thought and am repliing here since it is of a more general interest. Besides I hit the reply key already....

         About blacksmiths in Slovakia...

         My surname has the root k oc, having to do with a coach. I understand it could mean a coachman; driver or could refer to a coach builder. If the latter is more correct then maybe koc could also refer to a man who repairs coaches...as a blacksmith might.

         Kovac I understand to be the Slavic word/name for a blacksmith. I have noted the suffix kovic on names in my ancestral villiage [ie Martinkovic]

         Maybe the "ic" could be a Croat spelling  of kovac, or the "i" could replace the "a" as in Kocak and Kocik.

         If I was studying the name Martinkovic I might look for variations of "ova" or "ovych/ovich" but I'm using the name and it's suffix here as only an example of possible forms of the word for blacksmith type trades.

        So what I'm getting at is maybe there are other words or roots or suffixes of surnames that designate a form of specialized blacksmithing.

         This to me is an extremely interesting subject since blacksmiths were indispensible and possibly the most important of the trades since they manufactured things but more importantly they repaired tools and all things metal.

         These ramblings are  only my opinion.

        Larry

          Message -----
        From: "nilo3rak" <eirrac25@...>
        To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Wednesday, March 9, 2011 9:38:22 AM
        Subject: [S-R] Mortality data blacksmiths

        I am looking for a general trend - or lack of it - in the population of our ancestors who were blacksmiths.    

        If you know the age at death of any and all blacksmiths in your family tree and could share it, please send to me.

        In order not to clog this forum with an off topic, you can use my email address -
        jkovalo at earthlink.net.  This mailbox's Spam blocker will ask you to request my permission, please do.

        Thanks,
        Carolyn



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • genmom4
        I noticed Carolyn s post about Blacksmiths in Slovakia regarding mortality data. ... (I will contact Carolyn personally with the information that she is
        Message 3 of 4 , Mar 11 8:14 PM
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          I noticed Carolyn's post about Blacksmiths in Slovakia regarding mortality data.

          > If you know the age at death of any and all blacksmiths in your family tree and could share it, please send to me.
          (I will contact Carolyn personally with the information that she is requesting)

          The way Carolyn has posted this question (any and all blacksmith in your family tree) made me curious regarding this profession.

          I have only recently been able to find family info in the Trnava area regarding my relatives. My gr.grandfather was a blacksmith, as was his father. In looking through birth registries of the children of my gr.grandfather, I noticed that two of his children have godfathers with the same surname who are also blacksmiths in different towns.

          So, I have a gr.grandfather who was a blacksmith, and he has three sons who are also blacksmiths, but each is located in a different town in the area. Is this something that would be common with blacksmiths? Did the sons all learn the trade, and then go out into different towns?

          Did each town only have one blacksmith? Why would each son be living in a different town with that profession?

          My grandfather came to the US, to the PIttsburgh area and was hired immediately by Westinghouse in Braddock (turtle Creek) as a tool and die man, of which he already had experience. Where did these men learn their trades? Would they have attended some sort of school or apprenticeship to learn their trade?

          Thanks in advance.

          Barbara
        • nilo3rak
          Barbara, Nice to hear from another with a strong heritage of blacksmiths. In the years of our ancestors in old Hungary, 1700 s to early 1900 s, those years
          Message 4 of 4 , Mar 13 10:17 AM
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            Barbara,

            Nice to hear from another with a strong heritage of blacksmiths.


            In the years of our ancestors in old Hungary, 1700's to early 1900's, those years that we can document, the village or manorial blacksmith was an important person, a skilled craftsman, and usually well thought of. He and his wife were often godparents - very important choices - of children in the community. The mining industry and rail roads offered other opportunities for employment.

            They had no real property to pass on to their children. blacksmiths had only their personal tools and knowledge of their craft. This knowledge was each of their sons' patrimony. Not a bad thing, considering that the division of real property among heirs left a growing number of persons who were virtually and actually landless. They became the wandering day-workers, the ditch diggers, the mass that reached critical proportions and saw migration to America as a solution.

            A country estate, a hamlet, or small village had the need and could support one master blacksmith. If he had sons; if they wished to marry, they usually had to go off to another venue. It could be near or it could be far.

            In my own family there are five generations of blacksmiths. Not all were sons of blacksmiths, some came to learn the craft. While a student, they courted and wed the blacksmith's daughter.

            Two ancestors, blacksmiths, came to America. They had no problem getting work. One was employed in the steel mills, Pittsburgh. His wife and kids stayed in Hungary. Without his family, he had a great time traveling west with the railroads to Wyoming. Much better than going down into the mines. The other was employed as a skilled machinist in Cleveland.

            The history, the lore, the mythology of metal forging is closely tied to mining and mountains in all civilizations. In fact, tool making sets us apart from other primates, and civilization flourished because of its metalworkers. On the negative side, the weapons and ways of warfare were advanced and made more efficient, also.

            Carolyn








            --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "genmom4" <geismom@...> wrote:
            >
            > I noticed Carolyn's post about Blacksmiths in Slovakia regarding mortality data.
            >
            > > If you know the age at death of any and all blacksmiths in your family tree and could share it, please send to me.
            > (I will contact Carolyn personally with the information that she is requesting)
            >
            > The way Carolyn has posted this question (any and all blacksmith in your family tree) made me curious regarding this profession.
            >
            > I have only recently been able to find family info in the Trnava area regarding my relatives. My gr.grandfather was a blacksmith, as was his father. In looking through birth registries of the children of my gr.grandfather, I noticed that two of his children have godfathers with the same surname who are also blacksmiths in different towns.
            >
            > So, I have a gr.grandfather who was a blacksmith, and he has three sons who are also blacksmiths, but each is located in a different town in the area. Is this something that would be common with blacksmiths? Did the sons all learn the trade, and then go out into different towns?
            >
            > Did each town only have one blacksmith? Why would each son be living in a different town with that profession?
            >
            > My grandfather came to the US, to the PIttsburgh area and was hired immediately by Westinghouse in Braddock (turtle Creek) as a tool and die man, of which he already had experience. Where did these men learn their trades? Would they have attended some sort of school or apprenticeship to learn their trade?
            >
            > Thanks in advance.
            >
            > Barbara
            >
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