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Re: [S-R] Re: Kielbasa Recipe - Meandering topics

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  • hmsbob@aol.com
    mom made them the same way bob In a message dated 3/3/2011 7:55:55 P.M. Pacific Standard Time, lbrieda@yahoo.com writes: Hi Debbie, halusky is the name for the
    Message 1 of 48 , Mar 3, 2011
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      mom made them the same way
      bob


      In a message dated 3/3/2011 7:55:55 P.M. Pacific Standard Time,
      lbrieda@... writes:




      Hi Debbie, halusky is the name for the "noodles" - spaetzle really. You can
      top
      them with whatever you like. With brynda, you get bryndzove halusky. With
      cabbage (kapusta) and you get kapustove halusky, etc... You can also use
      these
      instead of macaroni in paprikash or chicken perkelt. But halusky is not
      noodles.
      It's potato dough tossed into boiling water. The dough is made by grating
      uncooked potatoes, adding salt, optionally an egg, and enough flour to get
      semi-stiff dough. You then put this mixture onto a board, smaller is
      better so
      that you can submerge the end in the boiling water. Then using a kitchen
      knife
      you toss little pieces of this dough into the water and cook for few
      minutes
      till they float up. Here is a video of my grandma tossing
      halusky: _http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Q0U1K_0Zbk._
      (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Q0U1K_0Zbk.) These are pink because they
      have ground liver mixed in them. These kinds of liver halusky are popular
      for
      chicken soup instead of the noodles. Chicken halusky soup?
      -- Lubos Brieda --

      Slovak recipes: www.slovakcooking.com

      ________________________________
      From: deeellessbee <_deeellessbee@..._
      (mailto:deeellessbee@...) >
      To: _SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com_ (mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com)
      Sent: Thu, March 3, 2011 10:42:58 PM
      Subject: [S-R] Re: Kielbasa Recipe - Meandering topics

      I'm a little late to this discussion, but two things I wanted to mention.
      Lubos, in my Slovak grandmother's house, halusky was fried cabbage and
      noodles,
      fried in about a pound of butter! A Slovak friend and I used to argue
      about
      this, because in her grandmother's house, halusky was noodles and cottage
      cheese
      (which my Irish/German grandmother made and called needles-and-cheedles,
      lol,
      most likely for the benefit of us grandkids). Since I have no knowledge of
      Slovak, maybe I'm reading your "halusky" incorrectly - is that pronounced
      ha-loosh-ky? Because that's how my grandmother (and my friend's
      grandmother)
      pronounced their dishes.

      Speaking of language...

      Secondly, Elaine, I was just at lunch with a former coworker today, whose
      mother
      is Slovak/Rusyn and father is Lemko/Polish, and the family speaks not only
      those
      languages but Ukranian to boot! She was just talking today about the
      sometimes
      mixed language in her home. She now has a son whose father is Albanian,
      and the
      child is learning to speak ALL those languages. I think that's truly
      amazing
      and wonderful!

      Debbie
      who sadly only speaks English (and a smattering of high-school French!)

      --- In _SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com_ (mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com)
      , Lubos Brieda <lbrieda@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi Elaine, "kluski" is actually
      > "halusky" _http://www.slovakcooking.com/2009/recipes/pasta/halusky/_
      (http://www.slovakcooking.com/2009/recipes/pasta/halusky/)
      >
      >
      > When you top them with bryndza (feta like sheep cheese) and pork
      cracklings you
      >
      > get Slovaka's national dish.
      > -- Lubos Brieda --
      >
      > Slovak recipes: www.slovakcooking.com
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > ________________________________
      > From: Elaine Summerhill <jato791@...>
      > To: _SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com_ (mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com)
      > Sent: Thu, March 3, 2011 3:54:01 PM
      > Subject: Re: [S-R] Re: Kielbasa Recipe - Meandering topics
      >
      > Thanks for the clarification on kielbasa & klohbasa. I didn't know there
      was a
      >
      > difference!
      >
      > I our home, we spoke a very strange language. It was a mixture of Rusyn,
      > Russian, Slovak, & Polish. Some food items though were: strudel, kapusta
      >and/or
      >
      >
      > halusky, kielbasa and/or klohbasa, kluski and/or knedle, etc. So many
      words
      > were used interchangeably. I never really knew what language was being
      spoken

      > at the time. And English? Well, we spoke the local dialect of
      "Balmorese".
      >To
      >
      >
      > this day, I tell people, "All spellings and word usages are
      questionable."
      > (For more on the local Baltimore, Maryland dialect, please
      > visit: _http://www.baltimorestories.com/main.cfm?nid=4&tid=160_
      (http://www.baltimorestories.com/main.cfm?nid=4&tid=160) )
      >
      > Story...
      >
      > Not long after I married my husband, who is of German descent, I made a
      pot of

      > chicken soup and homemade "kluski". As I was taught, the kluski were
      served in
      >
      > a dish separate from the soup so a person could add only as much as they

      >wanted.
      >
      >
      > Imagine my confusion when hubby took the kluski and topped it with
      butter &
      > nutmeg, eating it as a side dish? What???? He kept commenting, "Great
      > spaetzle!" Finally, I asked, "What the heck is spaetzle? That's kluski!
      Soup

      > noodles!" To this day, he still eats my kluski as a side dish and refers
      to it
      >
      > as spaetzle. What a gal to do?
      >
      > I'd love to attend your sausage making party. However, unfortunately, we
      moved
      >
      > from the Baltimore - DC corridor to New Mexico. I'll not be able to
      attend.
      >
      > Elaine
      >
      >
      >
      > ________________________________
      >
      >
      > Oh ok, the Slovak name for sausage is klobása (kloh-baah-sa). I thought
      you
      >were
      >
      >
      >
      > asking about the polish variety known as kielbasa. What you describe
      sound very
      >
      > much like the sausages prepared in Slovakia. I don't know where you
      live, we'll
      >
      > have some sausage making party here in D.C. in the near future. And yup,
      I
      >think
      >
      >
      >
      > knockwurst is the same as spekacky. I got some knockwurt from a german
      store
      > over here, and it tasted the same.
      > -- Lubos Brieda --
      >
      > Slovak recipes: www.slovakcooking.com
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
      > ------------------------------------
      >
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      (http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS/)
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      >

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    • June McKee
      all right already! lets get back to what this site is for! ... From: hmsbob@aol.com To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com Sent: Thursday, March 03, 2011 9:19 PM
      Message 48 of 48 , Mar 4, 2011
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        all right already! lets get back to what this site is for!
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: hmsbob@...
        To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Thursday, March 03, 2011 9:19 PM
        Subject: Re: [S-R] Re: Kielbasa Recipe - Meandering topics



        rue.ee :
        right on with the bow ties thanks

        bob


        In a message dated 3/3/2011 5:21:04 P.M. Pacific Standard Time,
        rue.ee.4gel41n3@... writes:

        _http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Carpatho-Rusyn-Recipes_
        (http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Carpatho-Rusyn-Recipes) have a couple of recipes as Kruschiki.
        A Hungarian list or web page might have it spelled as Cseregi. "Bow-tie"
        looking fried cookies, right?

        --- In _SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com_
        (mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com) , hmsbob@... wrote:
        >
        > DOES ANY ONE HAVE A RECIPE FOR I THINK IT IS CALLED "CHERIGI"
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





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