Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [S-R] Re: Kielbasa Recipe - Meandering topics

Expand Messages
  • Elaine Summerhill
    Thanks for the clarification on kielbasa & klohbasa. I didn t know there was a difference! I our home, we spoke a very strange language. It was a mixture of
    Message 1 of 54 , Mar 3, 2011
      Thanks for the clarification on kielbasa & klohbasa. I didn't know there was a
      difference!

      I our home, we spoke a very strange language. It was a mixture of Rusyn,
      Russian, Slovak, & Polish. Some food items though were: strudel, kapusta and/or
      halusky, kielbasa and/or klohbasa, kluski and/or knedle, etc. So many words
      were used interchangeably. I never really knew what language was being spoken
      at the time. And English? Well, we spoke the local dialect of "Balmorese". To
      this day, I tell people, "All spellings and word usages are questionable."
      (For more on the local Baltimore, Maryland dialect, please
      visit: http://www.baltimorestories.com/main.cfm?nid=4&tid=160)

      Story...

      Not long after I married my husband, who is of German descent, I made a pot of
      chicken soup and homemade "kluski". As I was taught, the kluski were served in
      a dish separate from the soup so a person could add only as much as they wanted.
      Imagine my confusion when hubby took the kluski and topped it with butter &
      nutmeg, eating it as a side dish? What???? He kept commenting, "Great
      spaetzle!" Finally, I asked, "What the heck is spaetzle? That's kluski! Soup
      noodles!" To this day, he still eats my kluski as a side dish and refers to it
      as spaetzle. What a gal to do?

      I'd love to attend your sausage making party. However, unfortunately, we moved
      from the Baltimore - DC corridor to New Mexico. I'll not be able to attend.

      Elaine



      ________________________________


      Oh ok, the Slovak name for sausage is klobása (kloh-baah-sa). I thought you were

      asking about the polish variety known as kielbasa. What you describe sound very
      much like the sausages prepared in Slovakia. I don't know where you live, we'll
      have some sausage making party here in D.C. in the near future. And yup, I think

      knockwurst is the same as spekacky. I got some knockwurt from a german store
      over here, and it tasted the same.
      -- Lubos Brieda --

      Slovak recipes: www.slovakcooking.com




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • hogelj
      I too would assume they are children of the head of household. In viewing my family s census pages, I ve found that the children of the couple are listed in
      Message 54 of 54 , Jul 22 7:20 PM
        I too would assume they are children of the head of household. In viewing my family's census pages, I've found that the children of the couple are listed in birth order after the parents.  If anyone other than a child is living in the household, I've found them entered after the children and the relationship to the head of the household listed above the name. 

        Don't forget to look at the right side of image 202 which shows the Sabol's buildings (household 85) and at the left side of image 204 which shows the Sabol family's animals.

        Judy

      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.