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Re: [SLOVAK-ROOTS] Passport and ship name

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  • krejc@aol.com
    Praha II is not listed in the book passenger ships of the world
    Message 1 of 12 , Jan 3, 2001
      Praha II is not listed in the book "passenger ships of the world"
    • gkopka1@aol.com
      I could not find it listed on any lists on the internet, either. So I do not know what to think. Is this not the ship s name? Ginger [Non-text portions of
      Message 2 of 12 , Jan 3, 2001
        I could not find it listed on any lists on the internet, either. So I do not
        know what to think. Is this not the ship's name?
        Ginger


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Frank Kurchina
        ... I do not ... No. Praha (Czech) = Prag (German) or Prague, the name of the Czech capital city. The cloth appears to be an advertisement, with the Cunard
        Message 3 of 12 , Jan 3, 2001
          --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@egroups.com, gkopka1@a... wrote:
          > I could not find it listed on any lists on the internet, either. So
          I do not
          > know what to think. Is this not the ship's name?
          > Ginger

          No.
          Praha (Czech) = Prag (German) or Prague, the name of the Czech
          capital city.

          The cloth appears to be an advertisement, with the Cunard Line's
          Praha (Prague, Czechoslovakia) ship office , street address and
          telephone no.
          Ship lines gave away items like that to potential customers.
          Or perhaps they sold them as souvenirs to the emigrants ?
          The ship manifest for U.S. port of entry would list name of the ship
          at top of volume page.

          Passport

          Stamped

          Vystahovalecky'
          Emigrant

          Cestovny' Pas
          Passport

          (cestovat' means to travel)

          C^islo cestovného pasu
          Passport number

          Méno majital'a
          Bearer's name

          Helena Karas(ová)

          Prislus^nost
          Nationality

          Czechoslovakia

          Domovská
          Home

          D^apalovce
          (located north of Holc^íkovce and 220 miles ENE of Bratislava)

          okres (district) Stropkov

          Osobny' popis
          Personal description

          Zamestnanie
          Occupation

          housewife

          Rodisko a dátum narodenia
          Birthplace and date of birth

          D^apalovce

          Bydlisko
          Residence

          Oblic^aj
          Face : oval

          Barva oc^í
          eye color : gray
          Barva vlasov
          hair color : brown


          Odjezd

          Departure

          Návrat

          Return
        • Gregory J. Kopchak
          Go to http://www.iarelative.com/history/bremen.htm for an 100 year old Passage to America ad and links to the Emigration Law of 1903 to see what your
          Message 4 of 12 , Jan 3, 2001
            Go to http://www.iarelative.com/history/bremen.htm
            for an 100 year old "Passage to America" ad and links
            to the Emigration Law of 1903 to see what
            your ancestors were up against.

            In 1903 it became illegal to display or discuss in
            public the ad shown on the page. Interesting piece of
            Immigration history.

            Greg Kopchak
            It's All Relative


            -----Original Message-----
            From: Frank Kurchina [mailto:frankur@...]
            Sent: Wednesday, January 03, 2001 2:13 PM
            To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@egroups.com
            Subject: [SLOVAK-ROOTS] Re: Passport and ship name


            --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@egroups.com, gkopka1@a... wrote:
            > I could not find it listed on any lists on the internet, either. So
            I do not
            > know what to think. Is this not the ship's name?
            > Ginger

            No.
            Praha (Czech) = Prag (German) or Prague, the name of the Czech
            capital city.

            The cloth appears to be an advertisement, with the Cunard Line's
            Praha (Prague, Czechoslovakia) ship office , street address and
            telephone no.
            Ship lines gave away items like that to potential customers.
            Or perhaps they sold them as souvenirs to the emigrants ?
            The ship manifest for U.S. port of entry would list name of the ship
            at top of volume page.

            Passport

            Stamped

            Vystahovalecky'
            Emigrant

            Cestovny' Pas
            Passport

            (cestovat' means to travel)

            C^islo cestovného pasu
            Passport number

            Méno majital'a
            Bearer's name

            Helena Karas(ová)

            Prislus^nost
            Nationality

            Czechoslovakia

            Domovská
            Home

            D^apalovce
            (located north of Holc^íkovce and 220 miles ENE of Bratislava)

            okres (district) Stropkov

            Osobny' popis
            Personal description

            Zamestnanie
            Occupation

            housewife

            Rodisko a dátum narodenia
            Birthplace and date of birth

            D^apalovce

            Bydlisko
            Residence

            Oblic^aj
            Face : oval

            Barva oc^í
            eye color : gray
            Barva vlasov
            hair color : brown


            Odjezd

            Departure

            Návrat

            Return
          • Fillmanshome@aol.com
            There is a man in Great Britain who researches ships for about 10 pounds, about $14.00 US. He accepts credit cards. His email address is
            Message 5 of 12 , Jan 3, 2001
              There is a man in Great Britain who researches ships for about 10 pounds,
              about $14.00 US. He accepts credit cards. His email address is
              donald.hazeldine@.... You can email him and he will tell you if he
              has any info. You could also try the Cunard Line web site. I'm pretty sure
              they have one. I know the Noth German Lloyd Line does. There are some other
              internet sites but I'm afraid I don't remember the addresses. I also found a
              book of pictures of ships at my local library in the genealogy department.
              It has loads of pictures of old ships. I was able through the help of Don
              and the book to get info and a picture of the ship my grandfather had listed
              on his naturalization papers. You might check there if your Aunt was
              naturalized. Depending on the date it will list the exit and entry ports,
              place of birth, place of residence prior to immigration, a physical
              description of the person, occupation and more. Happy Hunting RuthAnn
            • Fillmanshome@aol.com
              GInger, This is RuthAnn again. I knew I had the ship name but I couldn t find it anywhere and i looked lots of places. Don t give up.
              Message 6 of 12 , Jan 3, 2001
                GInger, This is RuthAnn again. I knew I had the ship name but I couldn't
                find it anywhere and i looked lots of places. Don't give up.
              • Frank Kurchina
                ... Your ad in article was from the Pecirkuv Narodni kalendar - 1900, published in Prague. It was featured on the back page of the almanac and calendar. F.
                Message 7 of 12 , Jan 4, 2001
                  --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@egroups.com, "Gregory J. Kopchak" <greg@i...>
                  wrote:
                  > Go to http://www.iarelative.com/history/bremen.htm
                  > for an 100 year old "Passage to America" ad and links
                  > to the Emigration Law of 1903 to see what
                  > your ancestors were up against.
                  >
                  > In 1903 it became illegal to display or discuss in
                  > public the ad shown on the page. Interesting piece of
                  > Immigration history.
                  >
                  > Greg Kopchak
                  > It's All Relative
                  >
                  >
                  > -----Original Message-----
                  > From: Frank Kurchina [mailto:frankur@a...]
                  > Sent: Wednesday, January 03, 2001 2:13 PM
                  > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@egroups.com
                  > Subject: [SLOVAK-ROOTS] Re: Passport and ship name

                  Your ad in article was from the Pecirkuv Narodni kalendar - 1900,
                  published in Prague.
                  It was featured on the back page of the almanac and calendar.
                  F. Missler of Bremen made an offer of passage to America, Africa, and
                  Australia from the Port of Bremen, Germany.
                  The ad, in Czech, was targeted for the Czech and Slovak people.

                  Your Slovakia site offers the Hungarian Emigration Law 1903 in
                  detail at URL.

                  http://www.iarelative.com/hung1903/index.html

                  However, none of this was applicable in 1929 when this subcriber's
                  relative emigrated.
                  The new country of Czechoslovakia was created in 1920.
                  There was no longer a Upper-Hungary, nor an Austro-Hungarian
                  Monarchy (1867-1918)
                • Barbara Keryan
                  Greg Thanks for that little bit of history. I am sure that many of our ancestors used Missler, I know that one of mine did. Barb
                  Message 8 of 12 , Jan 4, 2001
                    Greg

                    Thanks for that little bit of history. I am sure that many of our
                    ancestors used Missler, I know that one of mine did.

                    Barb



                    > Go to http://www.iarelative.com/history/bremen.htm
                    > for an 100 year old "Passage to America" ad and links
                    > to the Emigration Law of 1903 to see what
                    > your ancestors were up against.
                    >
                    > In 1903 it became illegal to display or discuss in
                    > public the ad shown on the page. Interesting piece of
                    > Immigration history.
                    >
                    > Greg Kopchak
                    > It's All Relative
                    >
                    > -----Original Message-----
                    > From: Frank Kurchina [mailto:frankur@...]
                    > Sent: Wednesday, January 03, 2001 2:13 PM
                    > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@egroups.com
                    > Subject: [SLOVAK-ROOTS] Re: Passport and ship name
                    >
                    > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@egroups.com, gkopka1@a... wrote:
                    > > I could not find it listed on any lists on the internet, either. So
                    > I do not
                    > > know what to think. Is this not the ship's name?
                    > > Ginger
                    >
                    > No.
                    > Praha (Czech) = Prag (German) or Prague, the name of the Czech
                    > capital city.
                    >
                    > The cloth appears to be an advertisement, with the Cunard Line's
                    > Praha (Prague, Czechoslovakia) ship office , street address and
                    > telephone no.
                    > Ship lines gave away items like that to potential customers.
                    > Or perhaps they sold them as souvenirs to the emigrants ?
                    > The ship manifest for U.S. port of entry would list name of the ship
                    > at top of volume page.
                    >
                    > Passport
                    >
                    > Stamped
                    >
                    > Vystahovalecky'
                    > Emigrant
                    >
                    > Cestovny' Pas
                    > Passport
                    >
                    > (cestovat' means to travel)
                    >
                    > C^islo cestovného pasu
                    > Passport number
                    >
                    > Méno majital'a
                    > Bearer's name
                    >
                    > Helena Karas(ová)
                    >
                    > Prislus^nost
                    > Nationality
                    >
                    > Czechoslovakia
                    >
                    > Domovská
                    > Home
                    >
                    > D^apalovce
                    > (located north of Holc^íkovce and 220 miles ENE of Bratislava)
                    >
                    > okres (district) Stropkov
                    >
                    > Osobny' popis
                    > Personal description
                    >
                    > Zamestnanie
                    > Occupation
                    >
                    > housewife
                    >
                    > Rodisko a dátum narodenia
                    > Birthplace and date of birth
                    >
                    > D^apalovce
                    >
                    > Bydlisko
                    > Residence
                    >
                    > Oblic^aj
                    > Face : oval
                    >
                    > Barva oc^í
                    > eye color : gray
                    > Barva vlasov
                    > hair color : brown
                    >
                    > Odjezd
                    >
                    > Departure
                    >
                    > Návrat
                    >
                    > Return
                  • Gregory J. Kopchak
                    It was in the period of 1890 to 1910 most immigration to America took place. Your family was very late in the immigration curve. I have the 1929 almanac and
                    Message 9 of 12 , Jan 4, 2001
                      It was in the period of 1890 to 1910 most immigration
                      to America took place.

                      Your family was very late in the immigration curve.

                      I have the 1929 almanac and will have to take a look
                      at what was offered to late arrivers.

                      Greg Kopchak


                      -----Original Message-----
                      From: Frank Kurchina [mailto:frankur@...]
                      Sent: Thursday, January 04, 2001 7:45 AM
                      To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@egroups.com
                      Subject: [SLOVAK-ROOTS] Re: Passport and ship name


                      --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@egroups.com, "Gregory J. Kopchak" <greg@i...>
                      wrote:
                      > Go to http://www.iarelative.com/history/bremen.htm
                      > for an 100 year old "Passage to America" ad and links
                      > to the Emigration Law of 1903 to see what
                      > your ancestors were up against.
                      >
                      > In 1903 it became illegal to display or discuss in
                      > public the ad shown on the page. Interesting piece of
                      > Immigration history.
                      >
                      > Greg Kopchak
                      > It's All Relative
                      >
                      >
                      > -----Original Message-----
                      > From: Frank Kurchina [mailto:frankur@a...]
                      > Sent: Wednesday, January 03, 2001 2:13 PM
                      > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@egroups.com
                      > Subject: [SLOVAK-ROOTS] Re: Passport and ship name

                      Your ad in article was from the Pecirkuv Narodni kalendar - 1900,
                      published in Prague.
                      It was featured on the back page of the almanac and calendar.
                      F. Missler of Bremen made an offer of passage to America, Africa, and
                      Australia from the Port of Bremen, Germany.
                      The ad, in Czech, was targeted for the Czech and Slovak people.

                      Your Slovakia site offers the Hungarian Emigration Law 1903 in
                      detail at URL.

                      http://www.iarelative.com/hung1903/index.html

                      However, none of this was applicable in 1929 when this subcriber's
                      relative emigrated.
                      The new country of Czechoslovakia was created in 1920.
                      There was no longer a Upper-Hungary, nor an Austro-Hungarian
                      Monarchy (1867-1918)
                    • Frank Kurchina
                      ... Don t know if above is a reference to my surname, or to that of subscriber who posted this query ? My first parental surname and male maternal surname
                      Message 10 of 12 , Jan 5, 2001
                        --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@egroups.com, "Gregory J. Kopchak" <greg@i...>
                        wrote:
                        > It was in the period of 1890 to 1910 most immigration
                        > to America took place.
                        >
                        > Your family was very late in the immigration curve.
                        >
                        > I have the 1929 almanac and will have to take a look
                        > at what was offered to late arrivers.
                        >
                        > Greg Kopchak
                        >
                        >
                        > -----Original Message-----
                        > From: Frank Kurchina [mailto:frankur@a...]
                        > Sent: Thursday, January 04, 2001 7:45 AM
                        > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@egroups.com
                        > Subject: [SLOVAK-ROOTS] Re: Passport and ship name
                        >
                        Don't know if above is a reference to my surname, or to that of
                        subscriber who posted this query ?

                        My first parental surname and male maternal surname bearer
                        arrived in US (together) in 1896 via Antwerp, Belgium and both
                        returned to Upper-Hungary (then Slovakia) by 1900.

                        My own parental GPs arrive in 1900.
                        Many parental surname bearers came later to US and but most returned
                        to Upper-Hungary, except those that emigrated to Canada.

                        v
                        Frank Kurcina
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