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Assets of Military Records

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  • jcotteret
    Hi group, I am absolutely convinced that we must part experiences we encountered during our searches, specially when they were successful. To enlight what can
    Message 1 of 5 , Oct 2, 2010
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi group,

      I am absolutely convinced that we must part experiences we encountered during our searches, specially when they were successful.
      To enlight what can be done consulting miltary archives, I will present you 3 personal instances :

      Case 1 : Stanislas Sohasky (°1771-+?)

      Born in November 1771 at Dembovexe (Dêbowiec in Polish) in Galicia, he became soldier in the Austro-Hungarian army , fought against Napoléon's troops and was made a prisoner of war by them. Sent to France, he married on 10/15/1803, got children and died in France.
      Having located «Dembovexe», I sent a letter to the vicar to get a copy of his birth certificate, but, as he answered me, the archives from 1770 to 1772 had been destroyed during the civil war of the same period.
      So that I had to switch to the miltary archives.
      Thanks to the information found in Carl Kotlarchik's well documented page on this topic, hosted on iabsi.com, I could locate the regiments liable to have enlisted Stanislas, due to his recruiting area :
      Infantry Regiments #45 (Latterman) and #26 (Schroeder)
      Having consulted the rolls ordered by the FHL, I eventually found him in IR#26.
      Stanislas had had very bad luck, having been transferred to the 3rd Battalion, the only one that took part to the Rivoli battle (Italy) on January 14th 1797.
      Due to his wedding date, it was obvious that he had been made a prisoner during the Italy Campaigns of the Napoleonic wars.

      Case 2: Peter Czibere «Campagne (°1778-+1837).

      My wife's gggrandfather, suffered a very similar experience to that of Stanislas.
      Born in Socmard ( apparently in the Szatmár megye) in 1778, he became a hussar in the Austro-Hungarian army, in the «Lichtenstein» Regiment, fought the French Army during the Ulm campaign in Germany and was made a prisoner of war in 1806 ( information found in his wedding certificate ). Sent to France he got married in 1810 and died in 1837.
      Here again Carl Kotlarchik's document helped a lot. The only Hussar Regiment which participated in the Ulm campaign was Hussar Regiment #06, and here too, only the 1st squadron took part to the last day assault in Echlingen (October 14th 1805).
      The knot was we did not know his actual Hungarian surname. Fortunately enough, from the films we evidenced there was only one Peter born in 1778 and, moreover in the Szatmarer Comitat : Peter Czibere.
      It was a piece of luck !
      From the record we learnt that he was born in Bodesalmar in (February?) 1778, had been incorporated on September 29th 1796, aged 18, and had lost his horse and been injured at the Echlingen fight , disappearing from the Regiment list at the same time.
      We know what followed !

      Case 3 : Joseph (Alexander?)(von) Rajner(y) (°?- +1848?)

      This is a totally different case. For the 2 previous ones, we had only to refer to the «Musterlisten und Standestabellen»,
      as it happened before 1820. In this case, it starts around 1812-1820 and ends in 1848.
      But the most important detail is that Joseph was presumedly an officer, a captain, in the Austro-Hugarian Army.
      Concerning officers, there are other documents available : Militär Schematismus , aka M.S. as quoted in, shall I say it again?, in Carl's document at iabsi.com.
      For the 1812/1820 period, I will have a look at the «Musterlisten und Standestabellen» (FHL films) and for the later period I will consult the «Grunbuchblätter» (FHL Films).
      But I have already consulted the M.S. on Google Books and found a Joseph von Rainer and have been able to follow his career from 1818 to 1848. Starting from «ensign» up to «Lieutenant Colonel», falling seriously ill in September 1846, and retiring in may 1847. That could be the guy we look for, for the ancestor had a son in Ranow(Poland in then Tarnopol county) in 1820, which revealed to be Reniv in Ukraine , and the garrison town was in Berezhany in Tarnopol county (Ukraine now) at that time.
      His son fled away to France in 1848, presumably due to the Hungarian revolt of 1848, since I have been told his father died in (Buda)Pest.
      This case is still pending, but I am confident we will soon get out of it.
      Need you any further enlightment, I stay at your disposal.
      Cheers
      Jacques
    • haluska
      Good for you! I love when success does not fit the norms... Very well documented. Please tell more of your strategy.I have a few soldiers in my tree. Dennis
      Message 2 of 5 , Oct 2, 2010
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        Good for you! I love when success does not fit the norms...
        Very well documented. Please tell more of your strategy.I have a few soldiers in my tree.

        Dennis

        --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "jcotteret" <jacques.cotteret@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi group,
        >
        > I am absolutely convinced that we must part experiences we encountered during our searches, specially when they were successful.
        > To enlight what can be done consulting miltary archives, I will present you 3 personal instances :
        >
        > Case 1 : Stanislas Sohasky (°1771-+?)
        >
        > Born in November 1771 at Dembovexe (Dêbowiec in Polish) in Galicia, he became soldier in the Austro-Hungarian army , fought against Napoléon's troops and was made a prisoner of war by them. Sent to France, he married on 10/15/1803, got children and died in France.
        > Having located «Dembovexe», I sent a letter to the vicar to get a copy of his birth certificate, but, as he answered me, the archives from 1770 to 1772 had been destroyed during the civil war of the same period.
        > So that I had to switch to the miltary archives.
        > Thanks to the information found in Carl Kotlarchik's well documented page on this topic, hosted on iabsi.com, I could locate the regiments liable to have enlisted Stanislas, due to his recruiting area :
        > Infantry Regiments #45 (Latterman) and #26 (Schroeder)
        > Having consulted the rolls ordered by the FHL, I eventually found him in IR#26.
        > Stanislas had had very bad luck, having been transferred to the 3rd Battalion, the only one that took part to the Rivoli battle (Italy) on January 14th 1797.
        > Due to his wedding date, it was obvious that he had been made a prisoner during the Italy Campaigns of the Napoleonic wars.
        >
        > Case 2: Peter Czibere «Campagne (°1778-+1837).
        >
        > My wife's gggrandfather, suffered a very similar experience to that of Stanislas.
        > Born in Socmard ( apparently in the Szatmár megye) in 1778, he became a hussar in the Austro-Hungarian army, in the «Lichtenstein» Regiment, fought the French Army during the Ulm campaign in Germany and was made a prisoner of war in 1806 ( information found in his wedding certificate ). Sent to France he got married in 1810 and died in 1837.
        > Here again Carl Kotlarchik's document helped a lot. The only Hussar Regiment which participated in the Ulm campaign was Hussar Regiment #06, and here too, only the 1st squadron took part to the last day assault in Echlingen (October 14th 1805).
        > The knot was we did not know his actual Hungarian surname. Fortunately enough, from the films we evidenced there was only one Peter born in 1778 and, moreover in the Szatmarer Comitat : Peter Czibere.
        > It was a piece of luck !
        > From the record we learnt that he was born in Bodesalmar in (February?) 1778, had been incorporated on September 29th 1796, aged 18, and had lost his horse and been injured at the Echlingen fight , disappearing from the Regiment list at the same time.
        > We know what followed !
        >
        > Case 3 : Joseph (Alexander?)(von) Rajner(y) (°?- +1848?)
        >
        > This is a totally different case. For the 2 previous ones, we had only to refer to the «Musterlisten und Standestabellen»,
        > as it happened before 1820. In this case, it starts around 1812-1820 and ends in 1848.
        > But the most important detail is that Joseph was presumedly an officer, a captain, in the Austro-Hugarian Army.
        > Concerning officers, there are other documents available : Militär Schematismus , aka M.S. as quoted in, shall I say it again?, in Carl's document at iabsi.com.
        > For the 1812/1820 period, I will have a look at the «Musterlisten und Standestabellen» (FHL films) and for the later period I will consult the «Grunbuchblätter» (FHL Films).
        > But I have already consulted the M.S. on Google Books and found a Joseph von Rainer and have been able to follow his career from 1818 to 1848. Starting from «ensign» up to «Lieutenant Colonel», falling seriously ill in September 1846, and retiring in may 1847. That could be the guy we look for, for the ancestor had a son in Ranow(Poland in then Tarnopol county) in 1820, which revealed to be Reniv in Ukraine , and the garrison town was in Berezhany in Tarnopol county (Ukraine now) at that time.
        > His son fled away to France in 1848, presumably due to the Hungarian revolt of 1848, since I have been told his father died in (Buda)Pest.
        > This case is still pending, but I am confident we will soon get out of it.
        > Need you any further enlightment, I stay at your disposal.
        > Cheers
        > Jacques
        >
      • jcotteret
        Dennis, Sorry to answer you so late, but I was over- busy. Thank you for your interest in the Military Archives. Here is a brief summary of my own strategy. I
        Message 3 of 5 , Oct 12, 2010
        • 0 Attachment
          Dennis,
          Sorry to answer you so late, but I was over- busy.
          Thank you for your interest in the Military Archives. Here is a brief summary of my own strategy.
          I suppose you have already had a glance at Carl Kotlarchik's well documented article on iabsi.com.
          As he quotes, the main thing is to determine in which regiment your soldier was serving.
          Fortunately enough,the Austro-Hungarian policy for recruiting was rather straightforward .
          The birth or living place induced a determined recruiting center and area with defined Infantry or Cavalry regiments , at least for a certain period of time,the number and denomination of regiments involved varying with time.
          Once this done, in order to reduce the choice, it is advisable to search for the Regiment's history if available, to see if your choice is sound.
          Has your soldier been involved in battles, I have a trick that has revealed to be very useful : I check the various battle orders on war games websites.These are more than often very well documented and accurate, particularly the Canadian ones. You can so learn, not only which regiments were on the spot but also which companies, battalions or squadrons were.That can help to confirm the soundness of your results and explain why, how and from where came your soldier.
          But every search is unique and different.
          One drawback with those archives is that they are written in old German Gothic Handwriting, not always very clear and so, difficult to read, even for a German speaker.
          Need you any help or information, please feel free to contact me directly, not to bother the whole group with that.


          --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "haluska" <ddhalusker@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          >
          > Good for you! I love when success does not fit the norms...
          > Very well documented. Please tell more of your strategy.I have a few soldiers in my tree.
          >
          > Dennis
          >
          > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "jcotteret" <jacques.cotteret@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Hi group,
          > >
          > > I am absolutely convinced that we must part experiences we encountered during our searches, specially when they were successful.
          > > To enlight what can be done consulting miltary archives, I will present you 3 personal instances :
          > >
          > > Case 1 : Stanislas Sohasky (°1771-+?)
          > >
          > > Born in November 1771 at Dembovexe (Dêbowiec in Polish) in Galicia, he became soldier in the Austro-Hungarian army , fought against Napoléon's troops and was made a prisoner of war by them. Sent to France, he married on 10/15/1803, got children and died in France.
          > > Having located «Dembovexe», I sent a letter to the vicar to get a copy of his birth certificate, but, as he answered me, the archives from 1770 to 1772 had been destroyed during the civil war of the same period.
          > > So that I had to switch to the miltary archives.
          > > Thanks to the information found in Carl Kotlarchik's well documented page on this topic, hosted on iabsi.com, I could locate the regiments liable to have enlisted Stanislas, due to his recruiting area :
          > > Infantry Regiments #45 (Latterman) and #26 (Schroeder)
          > > Having consulted the rolls ordered by the FHL, I eventually found him in IR#26.
          > > Stanislas had had very bad luck, having been transferred to the 3rd Battalion, the only one that took part to the Rivoli battle (Italy) on January 14th 1797.
          > > Due to his wedding date, it was obvious that he had been made a prisoner during the Italy Campaigns of the Napoleonic wars.
          > >
          > > Case 2: Peter Czibere «Campagne (°1778-+1837).
          > >
          > > My wife's gggrandfather, suffered a very similar experience to that of Stanislas.
          > > Born in Socmard ( apparently in the Szatmár megye) in 1778, he became a hussar in the Austro-Hungarian army, in the «Lichtenstein» Regiment, fought the French Army during the Ulm campaign in Germany and was made a prisoner of war in 1806 ( information found in his wedding certificate ). Sent to France he got married in 1810 and died in 1837.
          > > Here again Carl Kotlarchik's document helped a lot. The only Hussar Regiment which participated in the Ulm campaign was Hussar Regiment #06, and here too, only the 1st squadron took part to the last day assault in Echlingen (October 14th 1805).
          > > The knot was we did not know his actual Hungarian surname. Fortunately enough, from the films we evidenced there was only one Peter born in 1778 and, moreover in the Szatmarer Comitat : Peter Czibere.
          > > It was a piece of luck !
          > > From the record we learnt that he was born in Bodesalmar in (February?) 1778, had been incorporated on September 29th 1796, aged 18, and had lost his horse and been injured at the Echlingen fight , disappearing from the Regiment list at the same time.
          > > We know what followed !
          > >
          > > Case 3 : Joseph (Alexander?)(von) Rajner(y) (°?- +1848?)
          > >
          > > This is a totally different case. For the 2 previous ones, we had only to refer to the «Musterlisten und Standestabellen»,
          > > as it happened before 1820. In this case, it starts around 1812-1820 and ends in 1848.
          > > But the most important detail is that Joseph was presumedly an officer, a captain, in the Austro-Hugarian Army.
          > > Concerning officers, there are other documents available : Militär Schematismus , aka M.S. as quoted in, shall I say it again?, in Carl's document at iabsi.com.
          > > For the 1812/1820 period, I will have a look at the «Musterlisten und Standestabellen» (FHL films) and for the later period I will consult the «Grunbuchblätter» (FHL Films).
          > > But I have already consulted the M.S. on Google Books and found a Joseph von Rainer and have been able to follow his career from 1818 to 1848. Starting from «ensign» up to «Lieutenant Colonel», falling seriously ill in September 1846, and retiring in may 1847. That could be the guy we look for, for the ancestor had a son in Ranow(Poland in then Tarnopol county) in 1820, which revealed to be Reniv in Ukraine , and the garrison town was in Berezhany in Tarnopol county (Ukraine now) at that time.
          > > His son fled away to France in 1848, presumably due to the Hungarian revolt of 1848, since I have been told his father died in (Buda)Pest.
          > > This case is still pending, but I am confident we will soon get out of it.
          > > Need you any further enlightment, I stay at your disposal.
          > > Cheers
          > > Jacques
          > >
          >
        • Carl
          Dennis and Jacques, I m working on an update for my AHMilitary article at Bill Tarkulich s web site. For many years, I have tried to find the recruiting
          Message 4 of 5 , Oct 12, 2010
          • 0 Attachment
            Dennis and Jacques,
            I'm working on an update for my AHMilitary article at Bill Tarkulich's web site. For many years, I have tried to find the recruiting districts for non-infantry units (i.e. cavalry, artillery etc.). I recently found them in Alphon's Wrede's "History of the Austrian Armed Forces". This is a six volume set of books published around 1900. Unfortunately, the information is scattered over many pages. So, I hope to extract the individual recruiting areas for each regiment over time and build it into a chart listing all of the regiments. This will take me a while to do but hopefully, I will get at it as soon as the weather worsens. It has been too nice to work on it now. The chart will also list the associated infantry regiments that the non-infantry regiments were connected to. I'll post a message here when I complete the chart.
            Carl Kotlarchik

            --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "jcotteret" <jacques.cotteret@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            >
            > Dennis,
            > Sorry to answer you so late, but I was over- busy.
            > Thank you for your interest in the Military Archives. Here is a brief summary of my own strategy.
            > I suppose you have already had a glance at Carl Kotlarchik's well documented article on iabsi.com.
            > As he quotes, the main thing is to determine in which regiment your soldier was serving.
            > Fortunately enough,the Austro-Hungarian policy for recruiting was rather straightforward .
            > The birth or living place induced a determined recruiting center and area with defined Infantry or Cavalry regiments , at least for a certain period of time,the number and denomination of regiments involved varying with time.
            > Once this done, in order to reduce the choice, it is advisable to search for the Regiment's history if available, to see if your choice is sound.
            > Has your soldier been involved in battles, I have a trick that has revealed to be very useful : I check the various battle orders on war games websites.These are more than often very well documented and accurate, particularly the Canadian ones. You can so learn, not only which regiments were on the spot but also which companies, battalions or squadrons were.That can help to confirm the soundness of your results and explain why, how and from where came your soldier.
            > But every search is unique and different.
            > One drawback with those archives is that they are written in old German Gothic Handwriting, not always very clear and so, difficult to read, even for a German speaker.
            > Need you any help or information, please feel free to contact me directly, not to bother the whole group with that.
            >
            >
            > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "haluska" <ddhalusker@> wrote:
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > Good for you! I love when success does not fit the norms...
            > > Very well documented. Please tell more of your strategy.I have a few soldiers in my tree.
            > >
            > > Dennis
            > >
            > > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "jcotteret" <jacques.cotteret@> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > Hi group,
            > > >
            > > > I am absolutely convinced that we must part experiences we encountered during our searches, specially when they were successful.
            > > > To enlight what can be done consulting miltary archives, I will present you 3 personal instances :
            > > >
            > > > Case 1 : Stanislas Sohasky (°1771-+?)
            > > >
            > > > Born in November 1771 at Dembovexe (Dêbowiec in Polish) in Galicia, he became soldier in the Austro-Hungarian army , fought against Napoléon's troops and was made a prisoner of war by them. Sent to France, he married on 10/15/1803, got children and died in France.
            > > > Having located «Dembovexe», I sent a letter to the vicar to get a copy of his birth certificate, but, as he answered me, the archives from 1770 to 1772 had been destroyed during the civil war of the same period.
            > > > So that I had to switch to the miltary archives.
            > > > Thanks to the information found in Carl Kotlarchik's well documented page on this topic, hosted on iabsi.com, I could locate the regiments liable to have enlisted Stanislas, due to his recruiting area :
            > > > Infantry Regiments #45 (Latterman) and #26 (Schroeder)
            > > > Having consulted the rolls ordered by the FHL, I eventually found him in IR#26.
            > > > Stanislas had had very bad luck, having been transferred to the 3rd Battalion, the only one that took part to the Rivoli battle (Italy) on January 14th 1797.
            > > > Due to his wedding date, it was obvious that he had been made a prisoner during the Italy Campaigns of the Napoleonic wars.
            > > >
            > > > Case 2: Peter Czibere «Campagne (°1778-+1837).
            > > >
            > > > My wife's gggrandfather, suffered a very similar experience to that of Stanislas.
            > > > Born in Socmard ( apparently in the Szatmár megye) in 1778, he became a hussar in the Austro-Hungarian army, in the «Lichtenstein» Regiment, fought the French Army during the Ulm campaign in Germany and was made a prisoner of war in 1806 ( information found in his wedding certificate ). Sent to France he got married in 1810 and died in 1837.
            > > > Here again Carl Kotlarchik's document helped a lot. The only Hussar Regiment which participated in the Ulm campaign was Hussar Regiment #06, and here too, only the 1st squadron took part to the last day assault in Echlingen (October 14th 1805).
            > > > The knot was we did not know his actual Hungarian surname. Fortunately enough, from the films we evidenced there was only one Peter born in 1778 and, moreover in the Szatmarer Comitat : Peter Czibere.
            > > > It was a piece of luck !
            > > > From the record we learnt that he was born in Bodesalmar in (February?) 1778, had been incorporated on September 29th 1796, aged 18, and had lost his horse and been injured at the Echlingen fight , disappearing from the Regiment list at the same time.
            > > > We know what followed !
            > > >
            > > > Case 3 : Joseph (Alexander?)(von) Rajner(y) (°?- +1848?)
            > > >
            > > > This is a totally different case. For the 2 previous ones, we had only to refer to the «Musterlisten und Standestabellen»,
            > > > as it happened before 1820. In this case, it starts around 1812-1820 and ends in 1848.
            > > > But the most important detail is that Joseph was presumedly an officer, a captain, in the Austro-Hugarian Army.
            > > > Concerning officers, there are other documents available : Militär Schematismus , aka M.S. as quoted in, shall I say it again?, in Carl's document at iabsi.com.
            > > > For the 1812/1820 period, I will have a look at the «Musterlisten und Standestabellen» (FHL films) and for the later period I will consult the «Grunbuchblätter» (FHL Films).
            > > > But I have already consulted the M.S. on Google Books and found a Joseph von Rainer and have been able to follow his career from 1818 to 1848. Starting from «ensign» up to «Lieutenant Colonel», falling seriously ill in September 1846, and retiring in may 1847. That could be the guy we look for, for the ancestor had a son in Ranow(Poland in then Tarnopol county) in 1820, which revealed to be Reniv in Ukraine , and the garrison town was in Berezhany in Tarnopol county (Ukraine now) at that time.
            > > > His son fled away to France in 1848, presumably due to the Hungarian revolt of 1848, since I have been told his father died in (Buda)Pest.
            > > > This case is still pending, but I am confident we will soon get out of it.
            > > > Need you any further enlightment, I stay at your disposal.
            > > > Cheers
            > > > Jacques
            > > >
            > >
            >
          • Sharon Danko
            Carl, This sounds great and thank you for taking the time to do this. Sharon From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
            Message 5 of 5 , Oct 12, 2010
            • 0 Attachment
              Carl,



              This sounds great and thank you for taking the time to do this.

              Sharon



              From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com] On
              Behalf Of Carl
              Sent: Tuesday, October 12, 2010 11:25 AM
              To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [S-R] Re: Assets of Military Records





              Dennis and Jacques,
              I'm working on an update for my AHMilitary article at Bill Tarkulich's web
              site. For many years, I have tried to find the recruiting districts for
              non-infantry units (i.e. cavalry, artillery etc.). I recently found them in
              Alphon's Wrede's "History of the Austrian Armed Forces". This is a six
              volume set of books published around 1900. Unfortunately, the information is
              scattered over many pages. So, I hope to extract the individual recruiting
              areas for each regiment over time and build it into a chart listing all of
              the regiments. This will take me a while to do but hopefully, I will get at
              it as soon as the weather worsens. It has been too nice to work on it now.
              The chart will also list the associated infantry regiments that the
              non-infantry regiments were connected to. I'll post a message here when I
              complete the chart.
              Carl Kotlarchik

              --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com>
              , "jcotteret" <jacques.cotteret@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              >
              > Dennis,
              > Sorry to answer you so late, but I was over- busy.
              > Thank you for your interest in the Military Archives. Here is a brief
              summary of my own strategy.
              > I suppose you have already had a glance at Carl Kotlarchik's well
              documented article on iabsi.com.
              > As he quotes, the main thing is to determine in which regiment your
              soldier was serving.
              > Fortunately enough,the Austro-Hungarian policy for recruiting was rather
              straightforward .
              > The birth or living place induced a determined recruiting center and area
              with defined Infantry or Cavalry regiments , at least for a certain period
              of time,the number and denomination of regiments involved varying with time.
              > Once this done, in order to reduce the choice, it is advisable to search
              for the Regiment's history if available, to see if your choice is sound.
              > Has your soldier been involved in battles, I have a trick that has
              revealed to be very useful : I check the various battle orders on war games
              websites.These are more than often very well documented and accurate,
              particularly the Canadian ones. You can so learn, not only which regiments
              were on the spot but also which companies, battalions or squadrons were.That
              can help to confirm the soundness of your results and explain why, how and
              from where came your soldier.
              > But every search is unique and different.
              > One drawback with those archives is that they are written in old German
              Gothic Handwriting, not always very clear and so, difficult to read, even
              for a German speaker.
              > Need you any help or information, please feel free to contact me directly,
              not to bother the whole group with that.
              >
              >
              > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
              <mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com> , "haluska" <ddhalusker@> wrote:
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > Good for you! I love when success does not fit the norms...
              > > Very well documented. Please tell more of your strategy.I have a few
              soldiers in my tree.
              > >
              > > Dennis
              > >
              > > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
              <mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com> , "jcotteret" <jacques.cotteret@>
              wrote:
              > > >
              > > > Hi group,
              > > >
              > > > I am absolutely convinced that we must part experiences we encountered
              during our searches, specially when they were successful.
              > > > To enlight what can be done consulting miltary archives, I will
              present you 3 personal instances :
              > > >
              > > > Case 1 : Stanislas Sohasky (°1771-+?)
              > > >
              > > > Born in November 1771 at Dembovexe (Dêbowiec in Polish) in Galicia, he
              became soldier in the Austro-Hungarian army , fought against Napoléon's
              troops and was made a prisoner of war by them. Sent to France, he married on
              10/15/1803, got children and died in France.
              > > > Having located «Dembovexe», I sent a letter to the vicar to get a copy
              of his birth certificate, but, as he answered me, the archives from 1770 to
              1772 had been destroyed during the civil war of the same period.
              > > > So that I had to switch to the miltary archives.
              > > > Thanks to the information found in Carl Kotlarchik's well documented
              page on this topic, hosted on iabsi.com, I could locate the regiments liable
              to have enlisted Stanislas, due to his recruiting area :
              > > > Infantry Regiments #45 (Latterman) and #26 (Schroeder)
              > > > Having consulted the rolls ordered by the FHL, I eventually found him
              in IR#26.
              > > > Stanislas had had very bad luck, having been transferred to the 3rd
              Battalion, the only one that took part to the Rivoli battle (Italy) on
              January 14th 1797.
              > > > Due to his wedding date, it was obvious that he had been made a
              prisoner during the Italy Campaigns of the Napoleonic wars.
              > > >
              > > > Case 2: Peter Czibere «Campagne (°1778-+1837).
              > > >
              > > > My wife's gggrandfather, suffered a very similar experience to that of
              Stanislas.
              > > > Born in Socmard ( apparently in the Szatmár megye) in 1778, he became
              a hussar in the Austro-Hungarian army, in the «Lichtenstein» Regiment,
              fought the French Army during the Ulm campaign in Germany and was made a
              prisoner of war in 1806 ( information found in his wedding certificate ).
              Sent to France he got married in 1810 and died in 1837.
              > > > Here again Carl Kotlarchik's document helped a lot. The only Hussar
              Regiment which participated in the Ulm campaign was Hussar Regiment #06, and
              here too, only the 1st squadron took part to the last day assault in
              Echlingen (October 14th 1805).
              > > > The knot was we did not know his actual Hungarian surname. Fortunately
              enough, from the films we evidenced there was only one Peter born in 1778
              and, moreover in the Szatmarer Comitat : Peter Czibere.
              > > > It was a piece of luck !
              > > > From the record we learnt that he was born in Bodesalmar in
              (February?) 1778, had been incorporated on September 29th 1796, aged 18, and
              had lost his horse and been injured at the Echlingen fight , disappearing
              from the Regiment list at the same time.
              > > > We know what followed !
              > > >
              > > > Case 3 : Joseph (Alexander?)(von) Rajner(y) (°?- +1848?)
              > > >
              > > > This is a totally different case. For the 2 previous ones, we had only
              to refer to the «Musterlisten und Standestabellen»,
              > > > as it happened before 1820. In this case, it starts around 1812-1820
              and ends in 1848.
              > > > But the most important detail is that Joseph was presumedly an
              officer, a captain, in the Austro-Hugarian Army.
              > > > Concerning officers, there are other documents available : Militär
              Schematismus , aka M.S. as quoted in, shall I say it again?, in Carl's
              document at iabsi.com.
              > > > For the 1812/1820 period, I will have a look at the «Musterlisten und
              Standestabellen» (FHL films) and for the later period I will consult the
              «Grunbuchblätter» (FHL Films).
              > > > But I have already consulted the M.S. on Google Books and found a
              Joseph von Rainer and have been able to follow his career from 1818 to 1848.
              Starting from «ensign» up to «Lieutenant Colonel», falling seriously ill in
              September 1846, and retiring in may 1847. That could be the guy we look for,
              for the ancestor had a son in Ranow(Poland in then Tarnopol county) in 1820,
              which revealed to be Reniv in Ukraine , and the garrison town was in
              Berezhany in Tarnopol county (Ukraine now) at that time.
              > > > His son fled away to France in 1848, presumably due to the Hungarian
              revolt of 1848, since I have been told his father died in (Buda)Pest.
              > > > This case is still pending, but I am confident we will soon get out of
              it.
              > > > Need you any further enlightment, I stay at your disposal.
              > > > Cheers
              > > > Jacques
              > > >
              > >
              >





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