Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Request help locating "Canernacki" or "Cznernacki" Austria-Hungary

Expand Messages
  • Marjorie
    Hello, I was able to obtain a Petition for Naturalization for Michael Bless who emigrated to the Bronx, NY in 1896. The Petition states he was born 3 Jan 1882
    Message 1 of 27 , Aug 11, 2010
      Hello,
      I was able to obtain a Petition for Naturalization for Michael Bless who emigrated to the Bronx, NY in 1896. The Petition states he was born 3 Jan 1882 at "Canernacki" (or "Cznernacki"? - typing is unclear) "Austria-Hungary." The petition is dated 14 July 1927. He renounces allegiance to "The Republic of Austria, the Present State of Hungary, and The Czechoslovak Republic."

      I've looked at several websites but have not been able to identify which of a number of places this town might be. I have information that many Slovaks who settled in the Bronx and Yonkers NY were from Kosice or Spis, but I don't know if I can assume this applies to Michael Bless. So I don't know if I should look near Kosice and Spis for a "Canernacki/Cznernacki." Can anyone suggest anything about this town?

      Thank you in advance for your help.
      Marjie Dennin
    • Bill Tarkulich
      What ethnicity does he self-declare and what religion was he? Bill ... From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
      Message 2 of 27 , Aug 11, 2010
        What ethnicity does he self-declare and what religion was he?


        Bill


        -----Original Message-----
        From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com] On
        Behalf Of Marjorie
        Sent: Wednesday, August 11, 2010 10:23 AM
        To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [S-R] Request help locating "Canernacki" or "Cznernacki"
        Austria-Hungary

        Hello,
        I was able to obtain a Petition for Naturalization for Michael Bless who
        emigrated to the Bronx, NY in 1896. The Petition states he was born 3 Jan
        1882 at "Canernacki" (or "Cznernacki"? - typing is unclear)
        "Austria-Hungary." The petition is dated 14 July 1927. He renounces
        allegiance to "The Republic of Austria, the Present State of Hungary, and
        The Czechoslovak Republic."

        I've looked at several websites but have not been able to identify which of
        a number of places this town might be. I have information that many Slovaks
        who settled in the Bronx and Yonkers NY were from Kosice or Spis, but I
        don't know if I can assume this applies to Michael Bless. So I don't know if
        I should look near Kosice and Spis for a "Canernacki/Cznernacki." Can anyone
        suggest anything about this town?

        Thank you in advance for your help.
        Marjie Dennin



        ------------------------------------

        To visit your group on the web, go to:
        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS/

        To unsubscribe from this group, go to
        http://www.yahoogroups.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS -or- send blank email to
        SLOVAK-ROOTS-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.comYahoo! Groups Links
      • Michael Mojher
        Present day Semerenki, Ukraine in 1882 could have been in territory that was part of Northern Hungary. That is much of modern Slovakia. After WW II Slovakia
        Message 3 of 27 , Aug 11, 2010
          Present day Semerenki, Ukraine in 1882 could have been in territory that was part of Northern Hungary. That is much of modern Slovakia. After WW II Slovakia gave up a large piece of its eastern lands to the Ukraine.


          From: Bill Tarkulich
          Sent: Wednesday, August 11, 2010 7:27 AM
          To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: RE: [S-R] Request help locating "Canernacki" or "Cznernacki" Austria-Hungary



          What ethnicity does he self-declare and what religion was he?

          Bill

          -----Original Message-----
          From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com] On
          Behalf Of Marjorie
          Sent: Wednesday, August 11, 2010 10:23 AM
          To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [S-R] Request help locating "Canernacki" or "Cznernacki"
          Austria-Hungary

          Hello,
          I was able to obtain a Petition for Naturalization for Michael Bless who
          emigrated to the Bronx, NY in 1896. The Petition states he was born 3 Jan
          1882 at "Canernacki" (or "Cznernacki"? - typing is unclear)
          "Austria-Hungary." The petition is dated 14 July 1927. He renounces
          allegiance to "The Republic of Austria, the Present State of Hungary, and
          The Czechoslovak Republic."

          I've looked at several websites but have not been able to identify which of
          a number of places this town might be. I have information that many Slovaks
          who settled in the Bronx and Yonkers NY were from Kosice or Spis, but I
          don't know if I can assume this applies to Michael Bless. So I don't know if
          I should look near Kosice and Spis for a "Canernacki/Cznernacki." Can anyone
          suggest anything about this town?

          Thank you in advance for your help.
          Marjie Dennin

          ------------------------------------

          To visit your group on the web, go to:
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS/

          To unsubscribe from this group, go to
          http://www.yahoogroups.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS -or- send blank email to
          SLOVAK-ROOTS-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.comYahoo! Groups Links





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Marjorie
          Hi, Thanks for your replies. Michael Bless and family all self-identify as Slovak-speaking, and they attended Roman Catholic churches. Michael Bless and
          Message 4 of 27 , Aug 12, 2010
            Hi,
            Thanks for your replies.
            Michael Bless and family all self-identify as Slovak-speaking, and they attended Roman Catholic churches.

            Michael Bless and brother John (Janos) and the rest of the family clustered around the Bronx and Yonkers, NY, later moving northward into areas of Westchester County, NY. Initially, on arrival, they attended Most Holy Trinity Roman Catholic Church in Yonkers, NY and the Roman Catholic Church of St. John, Knightsbridge, Bronx, NY. Most Holy Trinity was largely, if not entirely, attended by Slovak immigrants, who at the time (1885-1900) of course all identified themselves as being from "Austria-Hungary." The book, "Slovaks on the Hudson" identified most of the early church members of Most Holy Trinity in Yonkers as being from Kosice and Spis. But the author later qualifies this somewhat, based on later records from the 1920s and 1930s that did not seem to show that pattern or origin for that later period.

            Meanwhile, I'll look into Semerenki as a possibility.
            Marjie

            --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "Michael Mojher" <mgmojher@...> wrote:
            >
            > Present day Semerenki, Ukraine in 1882 could have been in territory that was part of Northern Hungary. That is much of modern Slovakia. After WW II Slovakia gave up a large piece of its eastern lands to the Ukraine.
            >
            >
            > From: Bill Tarkulich
            > Sent: Wednesday, August 11, 2010 7:27 AM
            > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
            > Subject: RE: [S-R] Request help locating "Canernacki" or "Cznernacki" Austria-Hungary
            >
            >
            >
            > What ethnicity does he self-declare and what religion was he?
            >
            > Bill
            >
            > -----Original Message-----
            > From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com] On
            > Behalf Of Marjorie
            > Sent: Wednesday, August 11, 2010 10:23 AM
            > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
            > Subject: [S-R] Request help locating "Canernacki" or "Cznernacki"
            > Austria-Hungary
            >
            > Hello,
            > I was able to obtain a Petition for Naturalization for Michael Bless who
            > emigrated to the Bronx, NY in 1896. The Petition states he was born 3 Jan
            > 1882 at "Canernacki" (or "Cznernacki"? - typing is unclear)
            > "Austria-Hungary." The petition is dated 14 July 1927. He renounces
            > allegiance to "The Republic of Austria, the Present State of Hungary, and
            > The Czechoslovak Republic."
            >
            > I've looked at several websites but have not been able to identify which of
            > a number of places this town might be. I have information that many Slovaks
            > who settled in the Bronx and Yonkers NY were from Kosice or Spis, but I
            > don't know if I can assume this applies to Michael Bless. So I don't know if
            > I should look near Kosice and Spis for a "Canernacki/Cznernacki." Can anyone
            > suggest anything about this town?
            >
            > Thank you in advance for your help.
            > Marjie Dennin
            >
            > ------------------------------------
            >
            > To visit your group on the web, go to:
            > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS/
            >
            > To unsubscribe from this group, go to
            > http://www.yahoogroups.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS -or- send blank email to
            > SLOVAK-ROOTS-unsubscribe@...! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
          • Michael Mojher
            Were the Bless family from the village you are seeking? You admitted not being able to find Canernacki or Cznernacki. And my usual web tools did not either.
            Message 5 of 27 , Aug 12, 2010
              Were the Bless family from the village you are seeking?
              You admitted not being able to find Canernacki or Cznernacki. And my usual web tools did not either. One of them presented Semerenki as a possibility. Since during the period of your village search it was within Hungary held territory it seemed worthy of telling you about.
              From what you have replied with it appears you think that they may have come from Kosice and Spis. You sighted "Slovaks on the Hudson" saying Most Holy Trinity parishioners coming from those locations. I used the 1995 Slovak database to look for the surname Bless. There were no listings of that name in Slovakia. This is not unusual. I have found that other surnames have disappeared from Slovakia. My first reaction is to ask if you have any documents on your family. What is the spelling of the surname on them?
              With two incidents of the words not existing one may wonder why.
              Ellis Island had only 59 Bless listings. None were from Hungary or Austria. Austria was used after the formation of the Austro-Hungarian Empire in 1862. That shows that surname to be rather rare. I even tried the Slovak online telephone directory. It has found surnames the database did not have. Not one Bless.
              The Naturalization document may have had a Michael Bless, but that is not necessarily his original name. It would be the one he wanted to be know by in America. The birth date and immigration date may be valid. So far nothing has been found in the immigration records.
              Is there a marriage license you can look up? It may contain the birth place.


              From: Marjorie
              Sent: Thursday, August 12, 2010 11:24 AM
              To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [S-R] Request help locating "Canernacki" or "Cznernacki" Austria-Hungary





              Hi,
              Thanks for your replies.
              Michael Bless and family all self-identify as Slovak-speaking, and they attended Roman Catholic churches.

              Michael Bless and brother John (Janos) and the rest of the family clustered around the Bronx and Yonkers, NY, later moving northward into areas of Westchester County, NY. Initially, on arrival, they attended Most Holy Trinity Roman Catholic Church in Yonkers, NY and the Roman Catholic Church of St. John, Knightsbridge, Bronx, NY. Most Holy Trinity was largely, if not entirely, attended by Slovak immigrants, who at the time (1885-1900) of course all identified themselves as being from "Austria-Hungary." The book, "Slovaks on the Hudson" identified most of the early church members of Most Holy Trinity in Yonkers as being from Kosice and Spis. But the author later qualifies this somewhat, based on later records from the 1920s and 1930s that did not seem to show that pattern or origin for that later period.

              Meanwhile, I'll look into Semerenki as a possibility.
              Marjie

              --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "Michael Mojher" <mgmojher@...> wrote:
              >
              > Present day Semerenki, Ukraine in 1882 could have been in territory that was part of Northern Hungary. That is much of modern Slovakia. After WW II Slovakia gave up a large piece of its eastern lands to the Ukraine.
              >
              >
              > From: Bill Tarkulich
              > Sent: Wednesday, August 11, 2010 7:27 AM
              > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
              > Subject: RE: [S-R] Request help locating "Canernacki" or "Cznernacki" Austria-Hungary
              >
              >
              >
              > What ethnicity does he self-declare and what religion was he?
              >
              > Bill
              >
              > -----Original Message-----
              > From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com] On
              > Behalf Of Marjorie
              > Sent: Wednesday, August 11, 2010 10:23 AM
              > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
              > Subject: [S-R] Request help locating "Canernacki" or "Cznernacki"
              > Austria-Hungary
              >
              > Hello,
              > I was able to obtain a Petition for Naturalization for Michael Bless who
              > emigrated to the Bronx, NY in 1896. The Petition states he was born 3 Jan
              > 1882 at "Canernacki" (or "Cznernacki"? - typing is unclear)
              > "Austria-Hungary." The petition is dated 14 July 1927. He renounces
              > allegiance to "The Republic of Austria, the Present State of Hungary, and
              > The Czechoslovak Republic."
              >
              > I've looked at several websites but have not been able to identify which of
              > a number of places this town might be. I have information that many Slovaks
              > who settled in the Bronx and Yonkers NY were from Kosice or Spis, but I
              > don't know if I can assume this applies to Michael Bless. So I don't know if
              > I should look near Kosice and Spis for a "Canernacki/Cznernacki." Can anyone
              > suggest anything about this town?
              >
              > Thank you in advance for your help.
              > Marjie Dennin
              >
              > ------------------------------------
              >
              > To visit your group on the web, go to:
              > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS/
              >
              > To unsubscribe from this group, go to
              > http://www.yahoogroups.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS -or- send blank email to
              > SLOVAK-ROOTS-unsubscribe@...! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >





              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Marjorie
              Thanks for looking into my question about Canernacki or Czernacki. I googled Semerenki, Ukraine and unless I ve done something wrong, it looks quite far away
              Message 6 of 27 , Aug 18, 2010
                Thanks for looking into my question about Canernacki or Czernacki. I googled "Semerenki, Ukraine" and unless I've done something wrong, it looks quite far away from Slovakia. I've looked at the Jewishgen Shtetlseeker and got nothing for Canernacki or Cznernacki either when I limit the search to Slovakia using the Soundex as well as when I asked it to look for names containing part of the text.

                Michael Bless, the immigrant I'm trying to locate, said he arrived on the vessel "Slavenia" which he boarded at Fiume, which I guess was a part of the former Austrio-Hungarian empire that is in present-day Croatia. Does that offer any clue as to his origins?


                --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "Michael Mojher" <mgmojher@...> wrote:
                >
                > Present day Semerenki, Ukraine in 1882 could have been in territory that was part of Northern Hungary. That is much of modern Slovakia. After WW II Slovakia gave up a large piece of its eastern lands to the Ukraine.
                >
                >
                > From: Bill Tarkulich
                > Sent: Wednesday, August 11, 2010 7:27 AM
                > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                > Subject: RE: [S-R] Request help locating "Canernacki" or "Cznernacki" Austria-Hungary
                >
                >
                >
                > What ethnicity does he self-declare and what religion was he?
                >
                > Bill
                >
                > -----Original Message-----
                > From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com] On
                > Behalf Of Marjorie
                > Sent: Wednesday, August 11, 2010 10:23 AM
                > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                > Subject: [S-R] Request help locating "Canernacki" or "Cznernacki"
                > Austria-Hungary
                >
                > Hello,
                > I was able to obtain a Petition for Naturalization for Michael Bless who
                > emigrated to the Bronx, NY in 1896. The Petition states he was born 3 Jan
                > 1882 at "Canernacki" (or "Cznernacki"? - typing is unclear)
                > "Austria-Hungary." The petition is dated 14 July 1927. He renounces
                > allegiance to "The Republic of Austria, the Present State of Hungary, and
                > The Czechoslovak Republic."
                >
                > I've looked at several websites but have not been able to identify which of
                > a number of places this town might be. I have information that many Slovaks
                > who settled in the Bronx and Yonkers NY were from Kosice or Spis, but I
                > don't know if I can assume this applies to Michael Bless. So I don't know if
                > I should look near Kosice and Spis for a "Canernacki/Cznernacki." Can anyone
                > suggest anything about this town?
                >
                > Thank you in advance for your help.
                > Marjie Dennin
                >
                > ------------------------------------
                >
                > To visit your group on the web, go to:
                > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS/
                >
                > To unsubscribe from this group, go to
                > http://www.yahoogroups.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS -or- send blank email to
                > SLOVAK-ROOTS-unsubscribe@...! Groups Links
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
              • CurtB
                Marjorie, The name of the ship is the Slavonia. It did sail from Fiume. The port does not give much clue as to origins. Austria-Hungary had very well
                Message 7 of 27 , Aug 18, 2010
                  Marjorie,
                  The name of the ship is the Slavonia. It did sail from Fiume. The port does not give much clue as to origins. Austria-Hungary had very well developed rail lines by the beginning of the 20th century, so immigrants travelled long distances by rail to a port city very quickly. Trieste-Fiume, Hamburg, Bremen were among the largest embarcation ports for immigrants anywhere within the empire.

                  Curt B.

                  Here is a clip from the Palmer list on the Slavonia.
                  SLAVONIA (2)
                  The steamship SLAVONIA was built by Sir J Laing & Sons, Sunderland (ship #600) (engines by Wallsend Slipway Co Ltd) and launched on 15 November 1902 as the YAMUNA for the British India Line. 10,606 tons; 155.44 x 18.13 meters/510 x 59.5 feet (length x breadth); 1 funnel, 2 masts; twin-screw propulsion (triple-expansion engines), service speed 13 knots; accommodation for 40 passengers in 1st class and 800 in steerage. June 1903, completed (8,831 tons). 1904, purchased by the Cunard Line; renamed SLAVONIA; refitted for the North Atlantic service (10,606 tons; accommodation for 71 passengers in 1st class, 74 passengers in 2nd class, and 1,954 in steerage). 17 March 1904, first voyage, Sunderland-Trieste (departed 29 March)-Fiume-Palermo-New York. 5 May 1909, last voyage, Trieste-Fiume-Palermo-New York. 11 June 1909, wrecked at Flores, in the Azores, without loss of life; the passengers were taken off by the steamships PRINZESS IRENE (Norddeutscher Lloyd) and BATAVIA (Hamburg-America Line) [Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 1 (1975), p. 156; Arnold Kludas, Die grossen Passagierschiffe der Welt; Eine Dokumentation, Bd. 1: 1858-1912 (2nd ed.; Oldenburg/Hamburg: Gerhard Stalling, c1972), pp. 98-99 (2 photographs)]. Also pictured in Michael J. Anuta, Ships of Our Ancestors (Menominee, MI: Ships of Our Ancestors, 1983), p. 310, from the Alex Shaw Collection, Steamship Historical Society of America, Langsdale Library, University of Baltimore, 1420 Maryland Ave., Baltimore, MD 21201 - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 19 August 1998]
                  --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "Marjorie" <mddennin@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Thanks for looking into my question about Canernacki or Czernacki. I googled "Semerenki, Ukraine" and unless I've done something wrong, it looks quite far away from Slovakia. I've looked at the Jewishgen Shtetlseeker and got nothing for Canernacki or Cznernacki either when I limit the search to Slovakia using the Soundex as well as when I asked it to look for names containing part of the text.
                  >
                  > Michael Bless, the immigrant I'm trying to locate, said he arrived on the vessel "Slavenia" which he boarded at Fiume, which I guess was a part of the former Austrio-Hungarian empire that is in present-day Croatia. Does that offer any clue as to his origins?
                  >
                  >
                • Michael Mojher
                  Marjorie, What you need to compare is a map of Hungary pre-1918 with one for Czechoslovakia. You will notice that a rather large piece of eastern Hungary was
                  Message 8 of 27 , Aug 18, 2010
                    Marjorie,
                    What you need to compare is a map of Hungary pre-1918 with one for Czechoslovakia. You will notice that a rather large piece of eastern Hungary was given to the Ukraine. http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/22/Gubernias_de_Ucrania_-_ENG.png is a map that show the incursion of the Austro-Hungarian Empire and a line that represents the Ukraine today. The line of what is now in the Ukraine goes three "counties" to the east.
                    I searched Ellis Island. They have no listing for a ship named Slavenia, the closest is the Slavonia. The Slavonia first sailing out of Fiume was in 1905, several times. None in the 1896 you say Michael Bless immigrated. Where do you get your information?
                    Fiume is the Italian and Hungarian word for the Croatia city of Rijeka. Per se it does not give you a clue as to which country someone immigrated from. All of the central and southern European countries could have used it.



                    From: Marjorie
                    Sent: Wednesday, August 18, 2010 5:44 PM
                    To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: [S-R] Re: Request help locating "Canernacki" or "Cznernacki" Austria-Hungary



                    Thanks for looking into my question about Canernacki or Czernacki. I googled "Semerenki, Ukraine" and unless I've done something wrong, it looks quite far away from Slovakia. I've looked at the Jewishgen Shtetlseeker and got nothing for Canernacki or Cznernacki either when I limit the search to Slovakia using the Soundex as well as when I asked it to look for names containing part of the text.

                    Michael Bless, the immigrant I'm trying to locate, said he arrived on the vessel "Slavenia" which he boarded at Fiume, which I guess was a part of the former Austrio-Hungarian empire that is in present-day Croatia. Does that offer any clue as to his origins?

                    --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "Michael Mojher" <mgmojher@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Present day Semerenki, Ukraine in 1882 could have been in territory that was part of Northern Hungary. That is much of modern Slovakia. After WW II Slovakia gave up a large piece of its eastern lands to the Ukraine.
                    >
                    >
                    > From: Bill Tarkulich
                    > Sent: Wednesday, August 11, 2010 7:27 AM
                    > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                    > Subject: RE: [S-R] Request help locating "Canernacki" or "Cznernacki" Austria-Hungary
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > What ethnicity does he self-declare and what religion was he?
                    >
                    > Bill
                    >
                    > -----Original Message-----
                    > From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com] On
                    > Behalf Of Marjorie
                    > Sent: Wednesday, August 11, 2010 10:23 AM
                    > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                    > Subject: [S-R] Request help locating "Canernacki" or "Cznernacki"
                    > Austria-Hungary
                    >
                    > Hello,
                    > I was able to obtain a Petition for Naturalization for Michael Bless who
                    > emigrated to the Bronx, NY in 1896. The Petition states he was born 3 Jan
                    > 1882 at "Canernacki" (or "Cznernacki"? - typing is unclear)
                    > "Austria-Hungary." The petition is dated 14 July 1927. He renounces
                    > allegiance to "The Republic of Austria, the Present State of Hungary, and
                    > The Czechoslovak Republic."
                    >
                    > I've looked at several websites but have not been able to identify which of
                    > a number of places this town might be. I have information that many Slovaks
                    > who settled in the Bronx and Yonkers NY were from Kosice or Spis, but I
                    > don't know if I can assume this applies to Michael Bless. So I don't know if
                    > I should look near Kosice and Spis for a "Canernacki/Cznernacki." Can anyone
                    > suggest anything about this town?
                    >
                    > Thank you in advance for your help.
                    > Marjie Dennin
                    >
                    > ------------------------------------
                    >
                    > To visit your group on the web, go to:
                    > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS/
                    >
                    > To unsubscribe from this group, go to
                    > http://www.yahoogroups.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS -or- send blank email to
                    > SLOVAK-ROOTS-unsubscribe@...! Groups Links
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >





                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • CurtB
                    Marjorie, I forgot to tell you that you can search the Ellis Island site by individual ship,in this case the Slavonia. If you know his date of arrival,
                    Message 9 of 27 , Aug 18, 2010
                      Marjorie,
                      I forgot to tell you that you can search the Ellis Island site by individual ship,in this case the Slavonia. If you know his date of arrival, picking this out is easy. Looking over the whole list might give clues as to his name spelling and town of origin.

                      Curt B.

                      --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "Marjorie" <mddennin@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Thanks for looking into my question about Canernacki or Czernacki. I googled "Semerenki, Ukraine" and unless I've done something wrong, it looks quite far away from Slovakia. I've looked at the Jewishgen Shtetlseeker and got nothing for Canernacki or Cznernacki either when I limit the search to Slovakia using the Soundex as well as when I asked it to look for names containing part of the text.
                      >
                      > Michael Bless, the immigrant I'm trying to locate, said he arrived on the vessel "Slavenia" which he boarded at Fiume, which I guess was a part of the former Austrio-Hungarian empire that is in present-day Croatia. Does that offer any clue as to his origins?
                      >
                      >
                      > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "Michael Mojher" <mgmojher@> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > Present day Semerenki, Ukraine in 1882 could have been in territory that was part of Northern Hungary. That is much of modern Slovakia. After WW II Slovakia gave up a large piece of its eastern lands to the Ukraine.
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > From: Bill Tarkulich
                      > > Sent: Wednesday, August 11, 2010 7:27 AM
                      > > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                      > > Subject: RE: [S-R] Request help locating "Canernacki" or "Cznernacki" Austria-Hungary
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > What ethnicity does he self-declare and what religion was he?
                      > >
                      > > Bill
                      > >
                      > > -----Original Message-----
                      > > From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com] On
                      > > Behalf Of Marjorie
                      > > Sent: Wednesday, August 11, 2010 10:23 AM
                      > > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                      > > Subject: [S-R] Request help locating "Canernacki" or "Cznernacki"
                      > > Austria-Hungary
                      > >
                      > > Hello,
                      > > I was able to obtain a Petition for Naturalization for Michael Bless who
                      > > emigrated to the Bronx, NY in 1896. The Petition states he was born 3 Jan
                      > > 1882 at "Canernacki" (or "Cznernacki"? - typing is unclear)
                      > > "Austria-Hungary." The petition is dated 14 July 1927. He renounces
                      > > allegiance to "The Republic of Austria, the Present State of Hungary, and
                      > > The Czechoslovak Republic."
                      > >
                      > > I've looked at several websites but have not been able to identify which of
                      > > a number of places this town might be. I have information that many Slovaks
                      > > who settled in the Bronx and Yonkers NY were from Kosice or Spis, but I
                      > > don't know if I can assume this applies to Michael Bless. So I don't know if
                      > > I should look near Kosice and Spis for a "Canernacki/Cznernacki." Can anyone
                      > > suggest anything about this town?
                      > >
                      > > Thank you in advance for your help.
                      > > Marjie Dennin
                      > >
                      > > ------------------------------------
                      > >
                      > > To visit your group on the web, go to:
                      > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS/
                      > >
                      > > To unsubscribe from this group, go to
                      > > http://www.yahoogroups.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS -or- send blank email to
                      > > SLOVAK-ROOTS-unsubscribe@! Groups Links
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      > >
                      >
                    • Janet Kozlay
                      Marjorie, I think I have solved your problem, and it has nothing to do with Ukraine, nor even Slovakia. Your last bit of information did the trick. Miklos
                      Message 10 of 27 , Aug 18, 2010
                        Marjorie, I think I have solved your problem, and it has nothing to do with
                        Ukraine, nor even Slovakia. Your last bit of information did the trick.



                        Miklos Blesz, born about 1870, immigrated on June 5, 1904, from Pincze to
                        Akron, Ohio, aboard the Slavonia. Pincze (now Pince, Slovenia) was in Zala
                        county, Hungary, in the area which today is divided between Slovenia,
                        Hungary, and Croatia. Nearby was the village of Csernecz, which is still in
                        Hungary today, though you will find it on the map under the name
                        Muraszemenye. (Muraszemenye itself combines the old villages of Upper and
                        Lower [Felso- and Also-] Szemenye). This is admittedly pretty confusing. You
                        need to consult some maps, both old and new. The old map of Zala county, at
                        http://lazarus.elte.hu/hun/maps/1910/zala.jpg, shows the villages of Pincze,
                        Csernecz, and Felso- and Alsoszemenye in the district of Leteny.



                        Fortunately for you, there are microfilms of Roman Catholic records for both
                        Pincze and Csernecz. Pincze records, 1724-1895, are located with those for
                        Kerka-Szent-Miklos. Csernecz records, 1741-1895, are with those for
                        Muraszemenye.



                        It is a little puzzling why your ancestor called himself Michael after he
                        immigrated. Miklos is the Hungarian form of Nicholas. But of course he could
                        call himself whatever he wished, and perhaps the similarity of Miklos and
                        Michael made him choose the latter. The Hungarian form of Michael is Mihaly.



                        Have fun in your research.



                        Janet





                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • John
                        ... Given the original dates, it s amazing that you located Blesz. I tried +2 years on all dates and was trying to figure out how a 12-year old was emigrating
                        Message 11 of 27 , Aug 19, 2010
                          >>> Miklos Blesz, born about 1870, immigrated on June 5, 1904, from Pincze to Akron, Ohio, aboard the Slavonia. . . . Nearby was the village of Csernecz <<<

                          Given the original dates, it's amazing that you located Blesz. I tried +2 years on all dates and was trying to figure out how a 12-year old was emigrating without parents. Also, no reference to Slavonia out of Fiume near the year given.

                          Great work!
                        • John
                          ... A couple of points that might suggest that we have a different individual. 1) Point of clarification: Though the manifest says port of Fiume, the Ellis
                          Message 12 of 27 , Aug 19, 2010
                            >>> Miklos Blesz, born about 1870, immigrated on June 5, 1904, from Pincze to Akron, Ohio, aboard the Slavonia. <<<

                            A couple of points that might suggest that we have a different individual.

                            1) Point of clarification: Though the manifest says port of Fiume, the Ellis Island lookup says Palermo. Type Palermo to locate Blesz on Ellis Island.

                            2) A close look at the manifest says that Miklos was 39 and not 34. I suggest a transcription error. That makes his year of birth abt 1865.

                            3) It may be that we have established the correct village with Miklos but that Michael/Mihaly/Michal is still missing. Church records can be used to determine that.
                          • Marjorie
                            In the interest of space, I ve tried to combine the various comments and my replies. ... Thanks Curt. I m working from a poor photocopy of a naturalization
                            Message 13 of 27 , Aug 19, 2010
                              In the interest of space, I've tried to combine the various comments and my replies.

                              --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "CurtB" <curt67boc@...> wrote:
                              > Marjorie,
                              > The name of the ship is the Slavonia.
                              Thanks Curt. I'm working from a poor photocopy of a naturalization record typed with a bad typewriter that apparently used disappearing ink (OK, maybe I exaggerate on the latter). Anyway, the letters are difficult to make out – they are all either blobbed so an "o" looks like an "e," or the letters are typed across a pre-printed line on the form thus obscuring the letter, or the letter fades out entirely. I'm also working with conflicting information, since Michael Bless's naturalization says he came to the US in 1896, but the 1920 and 1930 censuses both say 1902.

                              --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "CurtB" <curt67boc@...> wrote:
                              >Marjorie,
                              >I forgot to tell you that you can search the Ellis Island site by individual
                              ship,in this case the Slavonia. If you know his date of arrival, picking this
                              out is easy. Looking over the whole list might give clues as to his name
                              spelling and town of origin.

                              >Curt B.


                              MY REPLY:
                              Curt, Thanks again. I had searched using just the ship's name "Slavenia" but of course that wasn't right so it was no wonder I came up with nothing. I'll re-do the search with "Slavonia" and "Fiume" and just the initials "M" and "B" and search those.



                              --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "Michael Mojher" <mgmojher@...> wrote:
                              > Present day Semerenki, Ukraine in 1882 could have been in territory that was part of Northern Hungary. That is much of modern Slovakia. After WW II Slovakia gave up a large piece of its eastern lands to the Ukraine.

                              > What you need to compare is a map of Hungary pre-1918 with one for
                              Czechoslovakia. You will notice that a rather large piece of eastern Hungary was given to the Ukraine.


                              MY REPLY:
                              Thanks , I tried your link and I see what you mean now. I must have done something wrong on my first search because the result that time was nowhere near any part of Slovakia.


                              --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "Janet Kozlay" wrote
                              >Miklos Blesz, born about 1870, immigrated on June 5, 1904, from Pincze to Akron, Ohio, aboard the Slavonia. Pincze (now Pince, Slovenia) was in Zala county, Hungary, in the area which today is divided between Slovenia,Hungary, and Croatia. Nearby was the village of Csernecz, which is still in Hungary today, though you will find it on the map under the name Muraszemenye.

                              > It is a little puzzling why your ancestor called himself Michael after he immigrated. Miklos is the Hungarian form of Nicholas.

                              --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com"Michael Mojher" wrote:
                              >I used the 1995 Slovak database to look for the surname Bless. There were no listings of that name in Slovakia…. My first reaction is to ask if you have any documents on your family. What is the spelling of the surname on them?... The Naturalization document may have had a Michael Bless, but that is notnecessarily his original name.

                              MY REPLY:
                              Thanks Janet and Michael, I think we're making progress. The village name "Csernecz" sounds promising, as does the last name "Blesz." My Michael Bless had a brother John (Janos) who went by "Bliss," but I don't think either Bless or Bliss is the original name. I'm just not sure. I have seen a "Bliss" in the Slovak phone book. I sent away for church records from the Bronx where Michael Bliss and John Bless settled. I got some baptismal records back. I also got some marriage records back but not for the original immigrant pairs, only for the later marriages of their children. None of the church records identified a place of origin. All identified Michael and John as "Bless" and "Bliss," respectively, with the single exception of a surname "Blachig" appearing on the baptism of the first daughter born to John Bliss. I have tried to follow "Blachig" as a surname but gotten nowhere. "Balasz" and "Ballas" were surnames of some of the witnesses for baptisms and marriages in the church records But I couldn't be sure that the "Balasz" and "Ballas" were relatives or just fellow parishioners with similar names. And even if they were close relatives, which of those names, "Balasz" or "Ballas" (or neither) was the original?

                              So "Blesz" is possible but I don't think Miklos can be my guy. Miklos Blesz born 1870 or 1865 is too old to be my guy. He's also going to Akron, Ohio, which doesn't fit with my Michael Bless going to the Bronx where his brother John had already settled. Finally, I am pretty certain that my guy was always "Michael" - or the Hungarian or Slovak versions thereof. The names "Michael" and "Joseph" appear repeatedly among the descendants of Michael the immigrant ancestor and his older brother John (Janos) for three or four generations in both their families. The name Nicholas does not appear anywhere.




                              --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com "John" johnqadam@... Wrote:
                              I …was trying to figure out how a 12-year old was emigrating
                              without parents. Also, no reference to Slavonia out of Fiume near the year
                              given.

                              MY REPLY:
                              Michael may have been traveling at a fairly young age. Michael's naturalization papers say he was born in 1882. The 1920 and 1930 censuses show him as 37 and 48 years old, respectively, thus born in 1892 or 1893. I can't be totally sure how old Michael was when he emigrated, since I have two different dates for his arrival in the US (1896, from the naturalization papers and 1902 from the censuses). I don't know which, if either, date is correct, or perhaps he came over, then went back, then came over again. If he was born in 1882 he could have been kind of young (1896 – 1882 = 14) traveling alone. This may not be impossible – my friend's mother traveled alone from Europe to the US at the age of 7 in the 1920's. Probably not a good idea but apparently that kind of thing was sometimes done at that time.



                              --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "John" <johnqadam@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > 2) Type Palermo to locate Blesz on Ellis Island.
                              >
                              > > 3) It may be that we have established the correct village with Miklos but that Michael/Mihaly/Michal is still missing. Church records can be used to determine that.

                              MY REPLY:
                              I'll follow up on these leads, maybe trying other surnames with Palermo.
                              >
                            • CurtB
                              Fantastic work Janet. I also found the same Miklos Blesz returning again to the U.S. with the manifest stamped non immigrant alien, meaning he had been here
                              Message 14 of 27 , Aug 19, 2010
                                Fantastic work Janet.
                                I also found the same Miklos Blesz returning again to the U.S. with the manifest stamped non immigrant alien, meaning he had been here before. On Feb 16 1907 he returns to New York aboard the Graf Waldersee, and even more important he is accompanied by his 16 year old son, also named Miklos Blesz. This means the son Miklos Blesz was born about 1891. They are again heading to Ohio. The son is the age that Marjorie is looking for. The record says they are of Hungarian nationality but of German ethnicity.

                                Curt B.

                                --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "Janet Kozlay" <kozlay@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > Marjorie, I think I have solved your problem, and it has nothing to do with
                                > Ukraine, nor even Slovakia. Your last bit of information did the trick.
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                > Miklos Blesz, born about 1870, immigrated on June 5, 1904, from Pincze to
                                > Akron, Ohio, aboard the Slavonia. Pincze (now Pince, Slovenia) was in Zala
                                > county, Hungary, in the area which today is divided between Slovenia,
                                > Hungary, and Croatia. Nearby was the village of Csernecz, which is still in
                                > Hungary today, though you will find it on the map under the name
                                > Muraszemenye. (Muraszemenye itself combines the old villages of Upper and
                                > Lower [Felso- and Also-] Szemenye). This is admittedly pretty confusing. You
                                > need to consult some maps, both old and new. The old map of Zala county, at
                                > http://lazarus.elte.hu/hun/maps/1910/zala.jpg, shows the villages of Pincze,
                                > Csernecz, and Felso- and Alsoszemenye in the district of Leteny.
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                > Fortunately for you, there are microfilms of Roman Catholic records for both
                                > Pincze and Csernecz. Pincze records, 1724-1895, are located with those for
                                > Kerka-Szent-Miklos. Csernecz records, 1741-1895, are with those for
                                > Muraszemenye.
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                > It is a little puzzling why your ancestor called himself Michael after he
                                > immigrated. Miklos is the Hungarian form of Nicholas. But of course he could
                                > call himself whatever he wished, and perhaps the similarity of Miklos and
                                > Michael made him choose the latter. The Hungarian form of Michael is Mihaly.
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                > Have fun in your research.
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                > Janet
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                >
                              • Michael Mojher
                                Curt, The Hungarian Royalty admired the advanced ways of Germans in many crafts. So they invited them to settle in Hungary. In the County of Spis, German
                                Message 15 of 27 , Aug 19, 2010
                                  Curt,
                                  The Hungarian Royalty admired the advanced ways of Germans in many crafts. So they invited them to settle in Hungary. In the County of Spis, German settlements received their collective privileges from King Stephen in 1271. During my trips to Slovakia I was told of "German villages" where even to this day they still practice the German culture.
                                  "Particularly unique among the privileges of German towns was the right to freely choose their mayors and town councils, an almost unprecedented right in European towns of the time. London being a notable exception. ... Following he example of towns, smaller settlements and villages were gradually able to freely elect mayors. In this way Slovakia, as early as the Middle Ages, became an area of communal self-government, another first in Europe." page 35 Illustrated Slovak History.


                                  From: CurtB
                                  Sent: Thursday, August 19, 2010 11:33 AM
                                  To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                                  Subject: [S-R] Re: Request help locating "Canernacki" or "Cznernacki" Austria-Hungary



                                  Fantastic work Janet.
                                  I also found the same Miklos Blesz returning again to the U.S. with the manifest stamped non immigrant alien, meaning he had been here before. On Feb 16 1907 he returns to New York aboard the Graf Waldersee, and even more important he is accompanied by his 16 year old son, also named Miklos Blesz. This means the son Miklos Blesz was born about 1891. They are again heading to Ohio. The son is the age that Marjorie is looking for. The record says they are of Hungarian nationality but of German ethnicity.

                                  Curt B.

                                  --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "Janet Kozlay" <kozlay@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > Marjorie, I think I have solved your problem, and it has nothing to do with
                                  > Ukraine, nor even Slovakia. Your last bit of information did the trick.
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > Miklos Blesz, born about 1870, immigrated on June 5, 1904, from Pincze to
                                  > Akron, Ohio, aboard the Slavonia. Pincze (now Pince, Slovenia) was in Zala
                                  > county, Hungary, in the area which today is divided between Slovenia,
                                  > Hungary, and Croatia. Nearby was the village of Csernecz, which is still in
                                  > Hungary today, though you will find it on the map under the name
                                  > Muraszemenye. (Muraszemenye itself combines the old villages of Upper and
                                  > Lower [Felso- and Also-] Szemenye). This is admittedly pretty confusing. You
                                  > need to consult some maps, both old and new. The old map of Zala county, at
                                  > http://lazarus.elte.hu/hun/maps/1910/zala.jpg, shows the villages of Pincze,
                                  > Csernecz, and Felso- and Alsoszemenye in the district of Leteny.
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > Fortunately for you, there are microfilms of Roman Catholic records for both
                                  > Pincze and Csernecz. Pincze records, 1724-1895, are located with those for
                                  > Kerka-Szent-Miklos. Csernecz records, 1741-1895, are with those for
                                  > Muraszemenye.
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > It is a little puzzling why your ancestor called himself Michael after he
                                  > immigrated. Miklos is the Hungarian form of Nicholas. But of course he could
                                  > call himself whatever he wished, and perhaps the similarity of Miklos and
                                  > Michael made him choose the latter. The Hungarian form of Michael is Mihaly.
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > Have fun in your research.
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > Janet
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                  >





                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                • CurtB
                                  Michael, This is not a Hungarian phenomenon. There were vast German settlements throughout the Habsburg empire as well as Russian. Eastern German
                                  Message 16 of 27 , Aug 19, 2010
                                    Michael,

                                    This is not a "Hungarian" phenomenon. There were vast German settlements throughout the Habsburg empire as well as Russian. Eastern German settlements are well mapped in most major European atlases. This is what caused such vast forced and voluntary migrations after World War II particularly from Czech and Slovak areas.

                                    I mention the ethnicity here because it may raise some questions as to whether this is the Blesz family being sought. On the other hand, in a search on ancestry.com almost all the immigrant Blesz's are found listed with German ethnicity, without regard to last place of residence. Most such people who are conscious of German ethnicity and have it listed in the ship registers still spoke German. Marjorie believes Bless or Blesz she is seeking was a Slovak speaker.

                                    Curt B.
                                    --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "Michael Mojher" <mgmojher@...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    > Curt,
                                    > The Hungarian Royalty admired the advanced ways of Germans in many crafts. So they invited them to settle in Hungary. In the County of Spis, German settlements received their collective privileges from King Stephen in 1271. During my trips to Slovakia I was told of "German villages" where even to this day they still practice the German culture.
                                    > "Particularly unique among the privileges of German towns was the right to freely choose their mayors and town councils, an almost unprecedented right in European towns of the time. London being a notable exception. ... Following he example of towns, smaller settlements and villages were gradually able to freely elect mayors. In this way Slovakia, as early as the Middle Ages, became an area of communal self-government, another first in Europe." page 35 Illustrated Slovak History.
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > From: CurtB
                                    > Sent: Thursday, August 19, 2010 11:33 AM
                                    > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                                    > Subject: [S-R] Re: Request help locating "Canernacki" or "Cznernacki" Austria-Hungary
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > Fantastic work Janet.
                                    > I also found the same Miklos Blesz returning again to the U.S. with the manifest stamped non immigrant alien, meaning he had been here before. On Feb 16 1907 he returns to New York aboard the Graf Waldersee, and even more important he is accompanied by his 16 year old son, also named Miklos Blesz. This means the son Miklos Blesz was born about 1891. They are again heading to Ohio. The son is the age that Marjorie is looking for. The record says they are of Hungarian nationality but of German ethnicity.
                                    >
                                    > Curt B.
                                    >
                                    > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "Janet Kozlay" <kozlay@> wrote:
                                    > >
                                    > > Marjorie, I think I have solved your problem, and it has nothing to do with
                                    > > Ukraine, nor even Slovakia. Your last bit of information did the trick.
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > > Miklos Blesz, born about 1870, immigrated on June 5, 1904, from Pincze to
                                    > > Akron, Ohio, aboard the Slavonia. Pincze (now Pince, Slovenia) was in Zala
                                    > > county, Hungary, in the area which today is divided between Slovenia,
                                    > > Hungary, and Croatia. Nearby was the village of Csernecz, which is still in
                                    > > Hungary today, though you will find it on the map under the name
                                    > > Muraszemenye. (Muraszemenye itself combines the old villages of Upper and
                                    > > Lower [Felso- and Also-] Szemenye). This is admittedly pretty confusing. You
                                    > > need to consult some maps, both old and new. The old map of Zala county, at
                                    > > http://lazarus.elte.hu/hun/maps/1910/zala.jpg, shows the villages of Pincze,
                                    > > Csernecz, and Felso- and Alsoszemenye in the district of Leteny.
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > > Fortunately for you, there are microfilms of Roman Catholic records for both
                                    > > Pincze and Csernecz. Pincze records, 1724-1895, are located with those for
                                    > > Kerka-Szent-Miklos. Csernecz records, 1741-1895, are with those for
                                    > > Muraszemenye.
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > > It is a little puzzling why your ancestor called himself Michael after he
                                    > > immigrated. Miklos is the Hungarian form of Nicholas. But of course he could
                                    > > call himself whatever he wished, and perhaps the similarity of Miklos and
                                    > > Michael made him choose the latter. The Hungarian form of Michael is Mihaly.
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > > Have fun in your research.
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > > Janet
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                    > >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                    >
                                  • Michael Mojher
                                    Curt, I am aware German settlements were all over Europe. They were the source of much contention, especially when Hitler used the Sudetenland claims as an
                                    Message 17 of 27 , Aug 19, 2010
                                      Curt,
                                      I am aware German settlements were all over Europe. They were the source of much contention, especially when Hitler used the Sudetenland claims as an excuse to start WW II.
                                      In my piece I wanted to show how early these German settlements began, 1271, six hundred years plus before the defeat of the Hapsburg Empire. And more importantly how Slovak politics became democratic long before it saw the light of day in other European countries.
                                      If Marjorie believed her family to be Slovak speakers is this Miklos Blesz a possible "red herring"? So much may fit, but is he is a Slovenian then it is the wrong person.


                                      From: CurtB
                                      Sent: Thursday, August 19, 2010 7:06 PM
                                      To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                                      Subject: [S-R] Re: Request help locating "Canernacki" or "Cznernacki" Austria-Hungary



                                      Michael,

                                      This is not a "Hungarian" phenomenon. There were vast German settlements throughout the Habsburg empire as well as Russian. Eastern German settlements are well mapped in most major European atlases. This is what caused such vast forced and voluntary migrations after World War II particularly from Czech and Slovak areas.

                                      I mention the ethnicity here because it may raise some questions as to whether this is the Blesz family being sought. On the other hand, in a search on ancestry.com almost all the immigrant Blesz's are found listed with German ethnicity, without regard to last place of residence. Most such people who are conscious of German ethnicity and have it listed in the ship registers still spoke German. Marjorie believes Bless or Blesz she is seeking was a Slovak speaker.

                                      Curt B.
                                      --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "Michael Mojher" <mgmojher@...> wrote:
                                      >
                                      > Curt,
                                      > The Hungarian Royalty admired the advanced ways of Germans in many crafts. So they invited them to settle in Hungary. In the County of Spis, German settlements received their collective privileges from King Stephen in 1271. During my trips to Slovakia I was told of "German villages" where even to this day they still practice the German culture.
                                      > "Particularly unique among the privileges of German towns was the right to freely choose their mayors and town councils, an almost unprecedented right in European towns of the time. London being a notable exception. ... Following he example of towns, smaller settlements and villages were gradually able to freely elect mayors. In this way Slovakia, as early as the Middle Ages, became an area of communal self-government, another first in Europe." page 35 Illustrated Slovak History.
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > From: CurtB
                                      > Sent: Thursday, August 19, 2010 11:33 AM
                                      > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                                      > Subject: [S-R] Re: Request help locating "Canernacki" or "Cznernacki" Austria-Hungary
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > Fantastic work Janet.
                                      > I also found the same Miklos Blesz returning again to the U.S. with the manifest stamped non immigrant alien, meaning he had been here before. On Feb 16 1907 he returns to New York aboard the Graf Waldersee, and even more important he is accompanied by his 16 year old son, also named Miklos Blesz. This means the son Miklos Blesz was born about 1891. They are again heading to Ohio. The son is the age that Marjorie is looking for. The record says they are of Hungarian nationality but of German ethnicity.
                                      >
                                      > Curt B.
                                      >
                                      > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "Janet Kozlay" <kozlay@> wrote:
                                      > >
                                      > > Marjorie, I think I have solved your problem, and it has nothing to do with
                                      > > Ukraine, nor even Slovakia. Your last bit of information did the trick.
                                      > >
                                      > >
                                      > >
                                      > > Miklos Blesz, born about 1870, immigrated on June 5, 1904, from Pincze to
                                      > > Akron, Ohio, aboard the Slavonia. Pincze (now Pince, Slovenia) was in Zala
                                      > > county, Hungary, in the area which today is divided between Slovenia,
                                      > > Hungary, and Croatia. Nearby was the village of Csernecz, which is still in
                                      > > Hungary today, though you will find it on the map under the name
                                      > > Muraszemenye. (Muraszemenye itself combines the old villages of Upper and
                                      > > Lower [Felso- and Also-] Szemenye). This is admittedly pretty confusing. You
                                      > > need to consult some maps, both old and new. The old map of Zala county, at
                                      > > http://lazarus.elte.hu/hun/maps/1910/zala.jpg, shows the villages of Pincze,
                                      > > Csernecz, and Felso- and Alsoszemenye in the district of Leteny.
                                      > >
                                      > >
                                      > >
                                      > > Fortunately for you, there are microfilms of Roman Catholic records for both
                                      > > Pincze and Csernecz. Pincze records, 1724-1895, are located with those for
                                      > > Kerka-Szent-Miklos. Csernecz records, 1741-1895, are with those for
                                      > > Muraszemenye.
                                      > >
                                      > >
                                      > >
                                      > > It is a little puzzling why your ancestor called himself Michael after he
                                      > > immigrated. Miklos is the Hungarian form of Nicholas. But of course he could
                                      > > call himself whatever he wished, and perhaps the similarity of Miklos and
                                      > > Michael made him choose the latter. The Hungarian form of Michael is Mihaly.
                                      > >
                                      > >
                                      > >
                                      > > Have fun in your research.
                                      > >
                                      > >
                                      > >
                                      > > Janet
                                      > >
                                      > >
                                      > >
                                      > >
                                      > >
                                      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                      > >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                      >





                                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                    • Marjorie
                                      I do appreciate everyone s efforts in this search. The history of the German people s migrations is fascinating. Still, I am very sure of my Michael Bless s
                                      Message 18 of 27 , Aug 20, 2010
                                        I do appreciate everyone's efforts in this search. The history of the German people's migrations is fascinating. Still, I am very sure of my Michael Bless's Slovak heritage. Both he and his brother report in at least two federal censuses each that they are Slovak speaking. They both settled in neighborhoods that are just full of other Slovak speakers, as shown on the census. They attended churches that were started by Slovak speakers and which were pastored by Slovak speaking priests brought over from the old country specifically for the job. In any records I've found, my Blesses might say they are Slovak-speaking. They may say they are from Austria-Hungary or just Austria, or Czechoslovakia but they never self-identify as German.


                                        Also, Miklos Blesz is too old to be the Michael Bless I'm looking for, and his son is also the wrong age to be my Michael Bless. There having gone to Ohio also makes them less likely candidates.
                                        I've tried searching for surnames and hometowns of Slovak neighbors and in-laws to try to get to the Bless/Bliss origins, but no luck yet. Some of the names were Bugden/Bogdon, Petro, Sopko, Katanik/Kitahek, Hydak, Czmar, Yuntek/Juntek, and Bushka. Do these give any clues as to origins? I tried to track down the WWI registrations for some of the men of the appropriate age. I found a few, but the names of their hometowns were almost unreadable (blurry, with faded ink) - and probably in Hungarian. Zapaboz, Colomer, and Uj Verbanz were some of the place names I sort of deciphered (most likely incorrectly). I googled them, got nothing, and didn't know what to do next. I got stuck on not finding a good enough website for locating Hungarian place names. Then I thought that even if I found all those surnames and places somewhere, it didn't guarrantee that my Bliss family came from there. Then the naturalization record arrived and it said "Canernacki" (or Cznernack) and I thought I'd finally found what I was looking for .....

                                        --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "Michael Mojher" <mgmojher@...> wrote:
                                        >
                                        > Curt,
                                        > I am aware German settlements were all over Europe. They were the source of much contention, especially when Hitler used the Sudetenland claims as an excuse to start WW II.
                                        > In my piece I wanted to show how early these German settlements began, 1271, six hundred years plus before the defeat of the Hapsburg Empire. And more importantly how Slovak politics became democratic long before it saw the light of day in other European countries.
                                        > If Marjorie believed her family to be Slovak speakers is this Miklos Blesz a possible "red herring"? So much may fit, but is he is a Slovenian then it is the wrong person.
                                        >
                                        >
                                        > From: CurtB
                                        > Sent: Thursday, August 19, 2010 7:06 PM
                                        > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                                        > Subject: [S-R] Re: Request help locating "Canernacki" or "Cznernacki" Austria-Hungary
                                        >
                                        >
                                        >
                                        > Michael,
                                        >
                                        > This is not a "Hungarian" phenomenon. There were vast German settlements throughout the Habsburg empire as well as Russian. Eastern German settlements are well mapped in most major European atlases. This is what caused such vast forced and voluntary migrations after World War II particularly from Czech and Slovak areas.
                                        >
                                        > I mention the ethnicity here because it may raise some questions as to whether this is the Blesz family being sought. On the other hand, in a search on ancestry.com almost all the immigrant Blesz's are found listed with German ethnicity, without regard to last place of residence. Most such people who are conscious of German ethnicity and have it listed in the ship registers still spoke German. Marjorie believes Bless or Blesz she is seeking was a Slovak speaker.
                                        >
                                        > Curt B.
                                        > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "Michael Mojher" <mgmojher@> wrote:
                                        > >
                                        > > Curt,
                                        > > The Hungarian Royalty admired the advanced ways of Germans in many crafts. So they invited them to settle in Hungary. In the County of Spis, German settlements received their collective privileges from King Stephen in 1271. During my trips to Slovakia I was told of "German villages" where even to this day they still practice the German culture.
                                        > > "Particularly unique among the privileges of German towns was the right to freely choose their mayors and town councils, an almost unprecedented right in European towns of the time. London being a notable exception. ... Following he example of towns, smaller settlements and villages were gradually able to freely elect mayors. In this way Slovakia, as early as the Middle Ages, became an area of communal self-government, another first in Europe." page 35 Illustrated Slovak History.
                                        > >
                                        > >
                                        > > From: CurtB
                                        > > Sent: Thursday, August 19, 2010 11:33 AM
                                        > > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                                        > > Subject: [S-R] Re: Request help locating "Canernacki" or "Cznernacki" Austria-Hungary
                                        > >
                                        > >
                                        > >
                                        > > Fantastic work Janet.
                                        > > I also found the same Miklos Blesz returning again to the U.S. with the manifest stamped non immigrant alien, meaning he had been here before. On Feb 16 1907 he returns to New York aboard the Graf Waldersee, and even more important he is accompanied by his 16 year old son, also named Miklos Blesz. This means the son Miklos Blesz was born about 1891. They are again heading to Ohio. The son is the age that Marjorie is looking for. The record says they are of Hungarian nationality but of German ethnicity.
                                        > >
                                        > > Curt B.
                                        > >
                                        > > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "Janet Kozlay" <kozlay@> wrote:
                                        > > >
                                        > > > Marjorie, I think I have solved your problem, and it has nothing to do with
                                        > > > Ukraine, nor even Slovakia. Your last bit of information did the trick.
                                        > > >
                                        > > >
                                        > > >
                                        > > > Miklos Blesz, born about 1870, immigrated on June 5, 1904, from Pincze to
                                        > > > Akron, Ohio, aboard the Slavonia. Pincze (now Pince, Slovenia) was in Zala
                                        > > > county, Hungary, in the area which today is divided between Slovenia,
                                        > > > Hungary, and Croatia. Nearby was the village of Csernecz, which is still in
                                        > > > Hungary today, though you will find it on the map under the name
                                        > > > Muraszemenye. (Muraszemenye itself combines the old villages of Upper and
                                        > > > Lower [Felso- and Also-] Szemenye). This is admittedly pretty confusing. You
                                        > > > need to consult some maps, both old and new. The old map of Zala county, at
                                        > > > http://lazarus.elte.hu/hun/maps/1910/zala.jpg, shows the villages of Pincze,
                                        > > > Csernecz, and Felso- and Alsoszemenye in the district of Leteny.
                                        > > >
                                        > > >
                                        > > >
                                        > > > Fortunately for you, there are microfilms of Roman Catholic records for both
                                        > > > Pincze and Csernecz. Pincze records, 1724-1895, are located with those for
                                        > > > Kerka-Szent-Miklos. Csernecz records, 1741-1895, are with those for
                                        > > > Muraszemenye.
                                        > > >
                                        > > >
                                        > > >
                                        > > > It is a little puzzling why your ancestor called himself Michael after he
                                        > > > immigrated. Miklos is the Hungarian form of Nicholas. But of course he could
                                        > > > call himself whatever he wished, and perhaps the similarity of Miklos and
                                        > > > Michael made him choose the latter. The Hungarian form of Michael is Mihaly.
                                        > > >
                                        > > >
                                        > > >
                                        > > > Have fun in your research.
                                        > > >
                                        > > >
                                        > > >
                                        > > > Janet
                                        > > >
                                        > > >
                                        > > >
                                        > > >
                                        > > >
                                        > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                        > > >
                                        > >
                                        > >
                                        > >
                                        > >
                                        > >
                                        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                        > >
                                        >
                                        >
                                        >
                                        >
                                        >
                                        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                        >
                                      • Michael Mojher
                                        Marjorie, Surnames as clues to where someone is from is not very useful. Every once in a while when searching the 1995 Census I have come across a surname that
                                        Message 19 of 27 , Aug 20, 2010
                                          Marjorie,
                                          Surnames as clues to where someone is from is not very useful. Every once in a while when searching the 1995 Census I have come across a surname that was found in only one village. In that case you can be pretty certain this is the ancestral village.
                                          One means is to do a search in the Census for all of your surnames. If one village comes up for all of the surnames you might have a good candidate. The only problem is they only list the "top 10" villages for the surname. The likelihood all of the surnames being in the "top 10" is pretty slim.
                                          I have already looked at Bliss and Blesz, there are no listing in the Census for those spellings. Alternatives were given. Bliss: biss, blass briss. Blesz: balesz, belesz, blesk.
                                          On my maternal grandmother's side of the family her sister married into the Sopko family. They were from Maly Saris, just outside of Presov.
                                          http://www.bogardi.com/gen/g104.shtml This will get you to Radix a good place to search for Hungarian villages. I really helps on this page to know the Hungarian county you are looking in. Under each county there are smaller subsets of villages. At least all the villages are listed. http://www.radixforum.com/ on this page you can search by surname and place. Click on surname, the "Bl" and start searching. The click on the name and information will come up.


                                          From: Marjorie
                                          Sent: Friday, August 20, 2010 10:17 AM
                                          To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                                          Subject: [S-R] Re: Request help locating "Canernacki" or "Cznernacki" Austria-Hungary



                                          I do appreciate everyone's efforts in this search. The history of the German people's migrations is fascinating. Still, I am very sure of my Michael Bless's Slovak heritage. Both he and his brother report in at least two federal censuses each that they are Slovak speaking. They both settled in neighborhoods that are just full of other Slovak speakers, as shown on the census. They attended churches that were started by Slovak speakers and which were pastored by Slovak speaking priests brought over from the old country specifically for the job. In any records I've found, my Blesses might say they are Slovak-speaking. They may say they are from Austria-Hungary or just Austria, or Czechoslovakia but they never self-identify as German.

                                          Also, Miklos Blesz is too old to be the Michael Bless I'm looking for, and his son is also the wrong age to be my Michael Bless. There having gone to Ohio also makes them less likely candidates.
                                          I've tried searching for surnames and hometowns of Slovak neighbors and in-laws to try to get to the Bless/Bliss origins, but no luck yet. Some of the names were Bugden/Bogdon, Petro, Sopko, Katanik/Kitahek, Hydak, Czmar, Yuntek/Juntek, and Bushka. Do these give any clues as to origins? I tried to track down the WWI registrations for some of the men of the appropriate age. I found a few, but the names of their hometowns were almost unreadable (blurry, with faded ink) - and probably in Hungarian. Zapaboz, Colomer, and Uj Verbanz were some of the place names I sort of deciphered (most likely incorrectly). I googled them, got nothing, and didn't know what to do next. I got stuck on not finding a good enough website for locating Hungarian place names. Then I thought that even if I found all those surnames and places somewhere, it didn't guarrantee that my Bliss family came from there. Then the naturalization record arrived and it said "Canernacki" (or Cznernack) and I thought I'd finally found what I was looking for .....

                                          --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "Michael Mojher" <mgmojher@...> wrote:
                                          >
                                          > Curt,
                                          > I am aware German settlements were all over Europe. They were the source of much contention, especially when Hitler used the Sudetenland claims as an excuse to start WW II.
                                          > In my piece I wanted to show how early these German settlements began, 1271, six hundred years plus before the defeat of the Hapsburg Empire. And more importantly how Slovak politics became democratic long before it saw the light of day in other European countries.
                                          > If Marjorie believed her family to be Slovak speakers is this Miklos Blesz a possible "red herring"? So much may fit, but is he is a Slovenian then it is the wrong person.
                                          >
                                          >
                                          > From: CurtB
                                          > Sent: Thursday, August 19, 2010 7:06 PM
                                          > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                                          > Subject: [S-R] Re: Request help locating "Canernacki" or "Cznernacki" Austria-Hungary
                                          >
                                          >
                                          >
                                          > Michael,
                                          >
                                          > This is not a "Hungarian" phenomenon. There were vast German settlements throughout the Habsburg empire as well as Russian. Eastern German settlements are well mapped in most major European atlases. This is what caused such vast forced and voluntary migrations after World War II particularly from Czech and Slovak areas.
                                          >
                                          > I mention the ethnicity here because it may raise some questions as to whether this is the Blesz family being sought. On the other hand, in a search on ancestry.com almost all the immigrant Blesz's are found listed with German ethnicity, without regard to last place of residence. Most such people who are conscious of German ethnicity and have it listed in the ship registers still spoke German. Marjorie believes Bless or Blesz she is seeking was a Slovak speaker.
                                          >
                                          > Curt B.
                                          > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "Michael Mojher" <mgmojher@> wrote:
                                          > >
                                          > > Curt,
                                          > > The Hungarian Royalty admired the advanced ways of Germans in many crafts. So they invited them to settle in Hungary. In the County of Spis, German settlements received their collective privileges from King Stephen in 1271. During my trips to Slovakia I was told of "German villages" where even to this day they still practice the German culture.
                                          > > "Particularly unique among the privileges of German towns was the right to freely choose their mayors and town councils, an almost unprecedented right in European towns of the time. London being a notable exception. ... Following he example of towns, smaller settlements and villages were gradually able to freely elect mayors. In this way Slovakia, as early as the Middle Ages, became an area of communal self-government, another first in Europe." page 35 Illustrated Slovak History.
                                          > >
                                          > >
                                          > > From: CurtB
                                          > > Sent: Thursday, August 19, 2010 11:33 AM
                                          > > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                                          > > Subject: [S-R] Re: Request help locating "Canernacki" or "Cznernacki" Austria-Hungary
                                          > >
                                          > >
                                          > >
                                          > > Fantastic work Janet.
                                          > > I also found the same Miklos Blesz returning again to the U.S. with the manifest stamped non immigrant alien, meaning he had been here before. On Feb 16 1907 he returns to New York aboard the Graf Waldersee, and even more important he is accompanied by his 16 year old son, also named Miklos Blesz. This means the son Miklos Blesz was born about 1891. They are again heading to Ohio. The son is the age that Marjorie is looking for. The record says they are of Hungarian nationality but of German ethnicity.
                                          > >
                                          > > Curt B.
                                          > >
                                          > > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "Janet Kozlay" <kozlay@> wrote:
                                          > > >
                                          > > > Marjorie, I think I have solved your problem, and it has nothing to do with
                                          > > > Ukraine, nor even Slovakia. Your last bit of information did the trick.
                                          > > >
                                          > > >
                                          > > >
                                          > > > Miklos Blesz, born about 1870, immigrated on June 5, 1904, from Pincze to
                                          > > > Akron, Ohio, aboard the Slavonia. Pincze (now Pince, Slovenia) was in Zala
                                          > > > county, Hungary, in the area which today is divided between Slovenia,
                                          > > > Hungary, and Croatia. Nearby was the village of Csernecz, which is still in
                                          > > > Hungary today, though you will find it on the map under the name
                                          > > > Muraszemenye. (Muraszemenye itself combines the old villages of Upper and
                                          > > > Lower [Felso- and Also-] Szemenye). This is admittedly pretty confusing. You
                                          > > > need to consult some maps, both old and new. The old map of Zala county, at
                                          > > > http://lazarus.elte.hu/hun/maps/1910/zala.jpg, shows the villages of Pincze,
                                          > > > Csernecz, and Felso- and Alsoszemenye in the district of Leteny.
                                          > > >
                                          > > >
                                          > > >
                                          > > > Fortunately for you, there are microfilms of Roman Catholic records for both
                                          > > > Pincze and Csernecz. Pincze records, 1724-1895, are located with those for
                                          > > > Kerka-Szent-Miklos. Csernecz records, 1741-1895, are with those for
                                          > > > Muraszemenye.
                                          > > >
                                          > > >
                                          > > >
                                          > > > It is a little puzzling why your ancestor called himself Michael after he
                                          > > > immigrated. Miklos is the Hungarian form of Nicholas. But of course he could
                                          > > > call himself whatever he wished, and perhaps the similarity of Miklos and
                                          > > > Michael made him choose the latter. The Hungarian form of Michael is Mihaly.
                                          > > >
                                          > > >
                                          > > >
                                          > > > Have fun in your research.
                                          > > >
                                          > > >
                                          > > >
                                          > > > Janet
                                          > > >
                                          > > >
                                          > > >
                                          > > >
                                          > > >
                                          > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                          > > >
                                          > >
                                          > >
                                          > >
                                          > >
                                          > >
                                          > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                          > >
                                          >
                                          >
                                          >
                                          >
                                          >
                                          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                          >





                                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                        • Michael Mojher
                                          From: Marjorie Sent: Friday, August 20, 2010 10:17 AM To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com Subject: [S-R] Re: Request help locating Canernacki or Cznernacki
                                          Message 20 of 27 , Aug 20, 2010
                                            From: Marjorie
                                            Sent: Friday, August 20, 2010 10:17 AM
                                            To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                                            Subject: [S-R] Re: Request help locating "Canernacki" or "Cznernacki" Austria-Hungary


                                            Marjorie,
                                            Surnames Bugden and Bogdon.
                                            Bugden had not listings and no alternatives given for the surname.
                                            Bogdon: Here is an example where the name is found in only one Slovak County - Rimavska Sobota for the top ten out of 26 places. And 68 of the 98 finds for Bodon are in the top ten.
                                            Priezvisko BODON sa na Slovensku v roku 1995 nachádzalo 98×, celkový pocet lokalít: 26, najcastejsie výskyty v lokalitách:
                                            GEMERSKÉ MICHALOVCE, okr. RIMAVSKÁ SOBOTA - 16×;
                                            RADNOVCE, okr. RIMAVSKÁ SOBOTA - 16×;
                                            RIMAVSKÁ SOBOTA, okr. RIMAVSKÁ SOBOTA - 16×;
                                            TORNALA, okr. RIMAVSKÁ SOBOTA (od r. 1996 REVÚCA) - 6×;
                                            DUBOVEC, okr. RIMAVSKÁ SOBOTA - 5×;
                                            NIZNÉ VALICE (obec VALICE), okr. RIMAVSKÁ SOBOTA - 4×;
                                            VIESKA NAD BLHOM, okr. RIMAVSKÁ SOBOTA - 4×;
                                            SKERESOVO, okr. RIMAVSKÁ SOBOTA (od r. 1996 REVÚCA) - 3×;
                                            STRKOVEC, okr. RIMAVSKÁ SOBOTA - 2×;
                                            ABOVCE, okr. RIMAVSKÁ SOBOTA - 2×;


                                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                          • Michael Mojher
                                            From: Marjorie Sent: Friday, August 20, 2010 10:17 AM To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com Subject: [S-R] Re: Request help locating Canernacki or Cznernacki
                                            Message 21 of 27 , Aug 20, 2010
                                              From: Marjorie
                                              Sent: Friday, August 20, 2010 10:17 AM
                                              To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                                              Subject: [S-R] Re: Request help locating "Canernacki" or "Cznernacki" Austria-Hungary

                                              Surname: Petro. With 1260 listings in 296 locations this is something of a "Smith" in surnames in Slovakia. None in the county that Bogdon was found.
                                              Priezvisko PETRO sa na Slovensku v roku 1995 nachádzalo 1234×, celkový pocet lokalít: 282, najcastejsie výskyty v lokalitách:
                                              SALA, okr. GALANTA (od r. 1996 SALA) - 63×;
                                              PRESOV, okr. PRESOV - 40×;
                                              BELÁ NAD CIROCHOU, okr. HUMENNÉ (od r. 1996 SNINA) - 35×;
                                              HENCOVCE (obec VRANOV NAD TOPLOU), okr. VRANOV NAD TOPLOU - 23×;
                                              SUMIAC, okr. BANSKÁ BYSTRICA (od r. 1996 BREZNO) - 22×;
                                              ROZNAVA, okr. ROZNAVA - 21×;
                                              TREBISOV, okr. TREBISOV - 20×;
                                              SEVER (obec KOSICE), okr. KOSICE - 19×;
                                              HUMENNÉ, okr. HUMENNÉ - 18×;
                                              VECA (obec SALA), okr. GALANTA (od r. 1996 SALA) - 18×;
                                              ...
                                              --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                              Priezvisko PETRÓ sa na Slovensku v roku 1995 nachádzalo 26×, celkový pocet lokalít: 14, v lokalitách:
                                              ZEMNÉ, okr. NOVÉ ZÁMKY - 5×;
                                              FARNÁ, okr. LEVICE - 3×;
                                              NESVADY, okr. KOMÁRNO - 3×;
                                              NOVÁ LIPNICA (obec DUNAJSKÁ LUZNÁ), okr. BRATISLAVA-VIDIEK (od r. 1996 SENEC) - 3×;
                                              MOKRANCE, okr. KOSICE-VIDIEK (od r. 1996 KOSICE - OKOLIE) - 2×;
                                              NOVÉ ZÁMKY, okr. NOVÉ ZÁMKY - 2×;
                                              SALA, okr. GALANTA (od r. 1996 SALA) - 1×;
                                              ZDANA, okr. KOSICE-VIDIEK (od r. 1996 KOSICE - OKOLIE) - 1×;
                                              KVETOSLAVOV, okr. DUNAJSKÁ STREDA - 1×;
                                              LEVICE, okr. LEVICE - 1×;
                                              VELKÝ KÝR, okr. NOVÉ ZÁMKY - 1×;
                                              VINICKY, okr. TREBISOV - 1×;
                                              JUH (obec KOSICE), okr. KOSICE - 1×;
                                              STARÉ MESTO (obec BRATISLAVA), okr. BRATISLAVA - 1×;


                                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                            • Michael Mojher
                                              From: Marjorie Sent: Friday, August 20, 2010 10:17 AM To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com Subject: [S-R] Re: Request help locating Canernacki or Cznernacki
                                              Message 22 of 27 , Aug 20, 2010
                                                From: Marjorie
                                                Sent: Friday, August 20, 2010 10:17 AM
                                                To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                                                Subject: [S-R] Re: Request help locating "Canernacki" or "Cznernacki" Austria-Hungary

                                                Surname: Sopko. Another common name, 1056 listings in 229 places.
                                                Priezvisko SOPKO sa na Slovensku v roku 1995 nachádzalo 1056×, celkový pocet lokalít: 229, najcastejsie výskyty v lokalitách:
                                                PRESOV, okr. PRESOV - 82×;
                                                POPROC, okr. KOSICE-VIDIEK (od r. 1996 KOSICE - OKOLIE) - 56×;
                                                SÍDLISKO KVP (obec KOSICE), okr. KOSICE - 28×;
                                                ZÁPAD (obec KOSICE), okr. KOSICE - 23×;
                                                DARGOVSKÝCH HRDINOV (obec KOSICE), okr. KOSICE - 22×;
                                                SPISSKÁ NOVÁ VES, okr. SPISSKÁ NOVÁ VES - 19×;
                                                JUH (obec KOSICE), okr. KOSICE - 18×;
                                                MICHALOVCE, okr. MICHALOVCE - 15×;
                                                VECHEC, okr. VRANOV NAD TOPLOU - 14×;
                                                PETRZALKA (obec BRATISLAVA), okr. BRATISLAVA - 14×;

                                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                              • Vladimir Linder
                                                Peter Lipa my friens and the No. 1 Jazzman of Slovakia sings about the invasion of August 21, 1968 in English. Go and watch and listen:
                                                Message 23 of 27 , Aug 20, 2010
                                                  Peter Lipa my friens and the No. 1 Jazzman of Slovakia sings about
                                                  the invasion of August 21, 1968 in English.

                                                  Go and watch and listen: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n26GrAMQ8zY

                                                  Vladi
                                                • William
                                                  Excellent. Thanks Vlady. Bill
                                                  Message 24 of 27 , Aug 21, 2010
                                                    Excellent. Thanks Vlady.
                                                    Bill


                                                    --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, Vladimir Linder <vlinder49@...> wrote:
                                                    >
                                                    > Peter Lipa my friens and the No. 1 Jazzman of Slovakia sings about
                                                    > the invasion of August 21, 1968 in English.
                                                    >
                                                    > Go and watch and listen: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n26GrAMQ8zY
                                                    >
                                                    > Vladi
                                                    >
                                                  • Vladimir Linder
                                                    Peter Lipa is coming to Vancouver December 3, 2010. I know Peter since before 1968 as he used to sing in the UNIVERSITY CLUB. I was there every weekend, having
                                                    Message 25 of 27 , Aug 21, 2010
                                                      Peter Lipa is coming to Vancouver December 3, 2010.

                                                      I know Peter since before 1968 as he used to sing
                                                      in the UNIVERSITY CLUB. I was there every
                                                      weekend, having great times, unforgetable.

                                                      Vladi

                                                      At 02:39 PM 8/21/2010, you wrote:
                                                      >
                                                      >
                                                      >Excellent. Thanks Vlady.
                                                      >Bill
                                                      >
                                                      >--- In
                                                      ><mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com>SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com,
                                                      >Vladimir Linder <vlinder49@...> wrote:
                                                      > >
                                                      > > Peter Lipa my friens and the No. 1 Jazzman of Slovakia sings about
                                                      > > the invasion of August 21, 1968 in English.
                                                      > >
                                                      > > Go and watch and listen:
                                                      > <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n26GrAMQ8zY>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n26GrAMQ8zY
                                                      > >
                                                      > > Vladi
                                                      > >
                                                      >
                                                      >
                                                    • M Jenner
                                                      I liked the song but wouldn t really classify it as jazz. The intro was a little jazzy but the rest sounded more funk or rock to me. I say this only because my
                                                      Message 26 of 27 , Aug 21, 2010
                                                        I liked the song but wouldn't really classify it as jazz. The intro was a little
                                                        jazzy but the rest sounded more funk or rock to me. I say this only because my
                                                        son is a professional jazz musician in New Orleans.






                                                        ________________________________
                                                        From: Vladimir Linder <vlinder49@...>
                                                        To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                                                        Sent: Sat, August 21, 2010 12:12:00 PM
                                                        Subject: Re: [S-R] Re: NO. 1 SLOVAK JAZZ MAN PETER LIPA


                                                        Peter Lipa is coming to Vancouver December 3, 2010.

                                                        I know Peter since before 1968 as he used to sing
                                                        in the UNIVERSITY CLUB. I was there every
                                                        weekend, having great times, unforgetable.

                                                        Vladi

                                                        At 02:39 PM 8/21/2010, you wrote:
                                                        >
                                                        >
                                                        >Excellent. Thanks Vlady.
                                                        >Bill
                                                        >
                                                        >--- In
                                                        ><mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com>SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com,
                                                        >Vladimir Linder <vlinder49@...> wrote:
                                                        > >
                                                        > > Peter Lipa my friens and the No. 1 Jazzman of Slovakia sings about
                                                        > > the invasion of August 21, 1968 in English.
                                                        > >
                                                        > > Go and watch and listen:
                                                        ><http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n26GrAMQ8zY>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n26GrAMQ8zY
                                                        >Y
                                                        > >
                                                        > > Vladi
                                                        > >
                                                        >
                                                        >







                                                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                                      • Vladimir Linder
                                                        This song is different from his repertoire commemorating August 21, 1968 the invasion of Czechoslovakia by the WARSAW PACT ARMIES. But he is a real jazz man
                                                        Message 27 of 27 , Aug 21, 2010
                                                          This song is different from his repertoire
                                                          commemorating August 21, 1968 the invasion of
                                                          Czechoslovakia by the WARSAW PACT ARMIES. But he
                                                          is a real jazz man No1 in SLOVAKIA


                                                          Vladi



                                                          At 03:42 PM 8/21/2010, you wrote:
                                                          >
                                                          >
                                                          >I liked the song but wouldn't really classify it
                                                          >as jazz. The intro was a little
                                                          >jazzy but the rest sounded more funk or rock to
                                                          >me. I say this only because my
                                                          >son is a professional jazz musician in New Orleans.
                                                          >
                                                          >________________________________
                                                          >From: Vladimir Linder <<mailto:vlinder49%40shaw.ca>vlinder49@...>
                                                          >To: <mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com>SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                                                          >Sent: Sat, August 21, 2010 12:12:00 PM
                                                          >Subject: Re: [S-R] Re: NO. 1 SLOVAK JAZZ MAN PETER LIPA
                                                          >
                                                          >Peter Lipa is coming to Vancouver December 3, 2010.
                                                          >
                                                          >I know Peter since before 1968 as he used to sing
                                                          >in the UNIVERSITY CLUB. I was there every
                                                          >weekend, having great times, unforgetable.
                                                          >
                                                          >Vladi
                                                          >
                                                          >At 02:39 PM 8/21/2010, you wrote:
                                                          > >
                                                          > >
                                                          > >Excellent. Thanks Vlady.
                                                          > >Bill
                                                          > >
                                                          > >--- In
                                                          > ><mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com><mailto:
                                                          > SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com>SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com,
                                                          > >Vladimir Linder <vlinder49@...> wrote:
                                                          > > >
                                                          > > > Peter Lipa my friens and the No. 1 Jazzman of Slovakia sings about
                                                          > > > the invasion of August 21, 1968 in English.
                                                          > > >
                                                          > > > Go and watch and listen:
                                                          > ><<http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n26GrAMQ8zY>ht
                                                          > tp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n26GrAMQ8zY>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n26GrAMQ8zY
                                                          > >Y
                                                          > > >
                                                          > > > Vladi
                                                          > > >
                                                          > >
                                                          > >
                                                          >
                                                          >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                                          >
                                                          >
                                                        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.