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2 records questions

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  • Julie Michutka
    Hi all, I feel like I ve been missing in action; it s been a while since I ve been a regular participant here (altho I still try to keep up at least with what
    Message 1 of 7 , Jul 10, 2010
      Hi all,

      I feel like I've been missing in action; it's been a while since I've
      been a regular participant here (altho' I still try to keep up at
      least with what topics are being discussed).

      I have to order some films for a new-to-me village. In looking at the
      FHL microfilm descriptions to figure out which ones have the span of
      years I need, I see in addition to baptism, marriage, and death info,
      a section called "rodna kniha." I've occasionally seen this on other
      film descriptions, but I've never gotten any of those films. What
      exactly is "rodna kniha"? I'm not even entirely sure how to translate
      it accurately, much less what kind of information to find in that
      section. Anyone know?

      My second question is about an apparently certified extract from a
      baptismal register--in other words, a birth/baptismal certificate from
      "the old country," issued about 40 years after the event. (I was
      looking at a black and white xerox.) In the lower corner was a stamp,
      noting a certain number of koruny--the paper lick-it-and-stick-it type
      of stamp, not an ink stamp; it resembles a postage stamp. I've seen
      this sort of thing before, it seems common enough to certified or
      official documents, but I've never really questioned just exactly what
      that stamp is. It seems to indicate some sort of payment (a few
      koruny, in this case), but also somehow contributes to it being an
      official document? Legal issues are not my forte! Can anyone
      enlighten me?

      Many thanks!

      Julie Michutka
      jmm@...
    • Michael Mojher
      Rodna kniha translates to Birth book From: Julie Michutka Sent: Saturday, July 10, 2010 7:57 PM To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com Subject: [S-R] 2 records
      Message 2 of 7 , Jul 10, 2010
        Rodna kniha translates to "Birth book"


        From: Julie Michutka
        Sent: Saturday, July 10, 2010 7:57 PM
        To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [S-R] 2 records questions



        Hi all,

        I feel like I've been missing in action; it's been a while since I've
        been a regular participant here (altho' I still try to keep up at
        least with what topics are being discussed).

        I have to order some films for a new-to-me village. In looking at the
        FHL microfilm descriptions to figure out which ones have the span of
        years I need, I see in addition to baptism, marriage, and death info,
        a section called "rodna kniha." I've occasionally seen this on other
        film descriptions, but I've never gotten any of those films. What
        exactly is "rodna kniha"? I'm not even entirely sure how to translate
        it accurately, much less what kind of information to find in that
        section. Anyone know?

        My second question is about an apparently certified extract from a
        baptismal register--in other words, a birth/baptismal certificate from
        "the old country," issued about 40 years after the event. (I was
        looking at a black and white xerox.) In the lower corner was a stamp,
        noting a certain number of koruny--the paper lick-it-and-stick-it type
        of stamp, not an ink stamp; it resembles a postage stamp. I've seen
        this sort of thing before, it seems common enough to certified or
        official documents, but I've never really questioned just exactly what
        that stamp is. It seems to indicate some sort of payment (a few
        koruny, in this case), but also somehow contributes to it being an
        official document? Legal issues are not my forte! Can anyone
        enlighten me?

        Many thanks!

        Julie Michutka
        jmm@...




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Michael Mojher
        http://www.iabsi.com/gen/public/document_examples.htm#1929_Rodny_list Does your document look like the 1929 Birth Certificate on this page? From: Julie
        Message 3 of 7 , Jul 10, 2010
          http://www.iabsi.com/gen/public/document_examples.htm#1929_Rodny_list Does your document look like the 1929 Birth Certificate on this page?


          From: Julie Michutka
          Sent: Saturday, July 10, 2010 7:57 PM
          To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [S-R] 2 records questions



          Hi all,

          I feel like I've been missing in action; it's been a while since I've
          been a regular participant here (altho' I still try to keep up at
          least with what topics are being discussed).

          I have to order some films for a new-to-me village. In looking at the
          FHL microfilm descriptions to figure out which ones have the span of
          years I need, I see in addition to baptism, marriage, and death info,
          a section called "rodna kniha." I've occasionally seen this on other
          film descriptions, but I've never gotten any of those films. What
          exactly is "rodna kniha"? I'm not even entirely sure how to translate
          it accurately, much less what kind of information to find in that
          section. Anyone know?

          My second question is about an apparently certified extract from a
          baptismal register--in other words, a birth/baptismal certificate from
          "the old country," issued about 40 years after the event. (I was
          looking at a black and white xerox.) In the lower corner was a stamp,
          noting a certain number of koruny--the paper lick-it-and-stick-it type
          of stamp, not an ink stamp; it resembles a postage stamp. I've seen
          this sort of thing before, it seems common enough to certified or
          official documents, but I've never really questioned just exactly what
          that stamp is. It seems to indicate some sort of payment (a few
          koruny, in this case), but also somehow contributes to it being an
          official document? Legal issues are not my forte! Can anyone
          enlighten me?

          Many thanks!

          Julie Michutka
          jmm@...




          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Julie Michutka
          ... Same layout, but entirely handwritten rather than on a preprinted form, and krstny list rather than rodny list; stamp is similar or identical. I have no
          Message 4 of 7 , Jul 11, 2010
            On Jul 10, 2010, at 11:27 PM, Michael Mojher wrote:

            > http://www.iabsi.com/gen/public/
            > document_examples.htm#1929_Rodny_list Does your document look like
            > the 1929 Birth Certificate on this page?


            Same layout, but entirely handwritten rather than on a preprinted
            form, and krstny list rather than rodny list; stamp is similar or
            identical. I have no problems with translating the document, it's just
            the use of the stamp. I can see how a baptismal extract could be used
            as a legal (civil) proof of date of birth and be issued by the state
            rather than the church. But what's the stamp for?

            I've seen similar on 18th century Welsh probate documents. Wondered
            about it then, too. Stamps, showing that some small amount of money
            was paid, on a legal document. Why a stamp, why a payment? If the
            stamp is to prove payment, the second question still stands.

            Thanks for the translation of rodna kniha, and for the pointer to
            Bill's site. I cruise through Bill's collection periodically, and
            often turn there when I have a question, but I had forgotten that he
            had document images.

            Julie


            >
            >
            > From: Julie Michutka
            > Sent: Saturday, July 10, 2010 7:57 PM
            > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
            > Subject: [S-R] 2 records questions
            >
            >
            > My second question is about an apparently certified extract from a
            > baptismal register--in other words, a birth/baptismal certificate from
            > "the old country," issued about 40 years after the event. (I was
            > looking at a black and white xerox.) In the lower corner was a stamp,
            > noting a certain number of koruny--the paper lick-it-and-stick-it type
            > of stamp, not an ink stamp; it resembles a postage stamp. I've seen
            > this sort of thing before, it seems common enough to certified or
            > official documents, but I've never really questioned just exactly what
            > that stamp is. It seems to indicate some sort of payment (a few
            > koruny, in this case), but also somehow contributes to it being an
            > official document?
          • Bill Tarkulich
            Hi Julie, Governments around the world have often required payments for official documents. A stamp was just one means of proving payment. We even see such
            Message 5 of 7 , Jul 11, 2010
              Hi Julie,

              Governments around the world have often required payments for official
              documents. A stamp was just one means of proving payment. We even see such
              things in the USA. I've seen them on my grandparent's land deeds from the
              1910's.

              You ask why? I don't know, perhaps because they can. These are often
              called "tax" or "tax stamps". Just another way for the government to raise
              funds, regardless of the reasons you often read. Google about, you can find
              a lot of information about these taxes online.
              http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stamp_duty


              Bill

              -----Original Message-----
              From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com] On
              Behalf Of Julie Michutka
              Sent: Sunday, July 11, 2010 8:07 AM
              To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [S-R] 2 records questions


              On Jul 10, 2010, at 11:27 PM, Michael Mojher wrote:

              > http://www.iabsi.com/gen/public/
              > document_examples.htm#1929_Rodny_list Does your document look like
              > the 1929 Birth Certificate on this page?


              Same layout, but entirely handwritten rather than on a preprinted
              form, and krstny list rather than rodny list; stamp is similar or
              identical. I have no problems with translating the document, it's just
              the use of the stamp. I can see how a baptismal extract could be used
              as a legal (civil) proof of date of birth and be issued by the state
              rather than the church. But what's the stamp for?

              I've seen similar on 18th century Welsh probate documents. Wondered
              about it then, too. Stamps, showing that some small amount of money
              was paid, on a legal document. Why a stamp, why a payment? If the
              stamp is to prove payment, the second question still stands.

              Thanks for the translation of rodna kniha, and for the pointer to
              Bill's site. I cruise through Bill's collection periodically, and
              often turn there when I have a question, but I had forgotten that he
              had document images.

              Julie


              >
              >
              > From: Julie Michutka
              > Sent: Saturday, July 10, 2010 7:57 PM
              > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
              > Subject: [S-R] 2 records questions
              >
              >
              > My second question is about an apparently certified extract from a
              > baptismal register--in other words, a birth/baptismal certificate from
              > "the old country," issued about 40 years after the event. (I was
              > looking at a black and white xerox.) In the lower corner was a stamp,
              > noting a certain number of koruny--the paper lick-it-and-stick-it type
              > of stamp, not an ink stamp; it resembles a postage stamp. I've seen
              > this sort of thing before, it seems common enough to certified or
              > official documents, but I've never really questioned just exactly what
              > that stamp is. It seems to indicate some sort of payment (a few
              > koruny, in this case), but also somehow contributes to it being an
              > official document?


              ------------------------------------

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            • Julie Michutka
              Thanks, Bill! Julie
              Message 6 of 7 , Jul 11, 2010
                Thanks, Bill!

                Julie

                On Jul 11, 2010, at 9:37 AM, Bill Tarkulich wrote:

                > Hi Julie,
                >
                > Governments around the world have often required payments for official
                > documents. A stamp was just one means of proving payment. We even
                > see such
                > things in the USA. I've seen them on my grandparent's land deeds
                > from the
                > 1910's.
                >
                > You ask why? I don't know, perhaps because they can. These are often
                > called "tax" or "tax stamps". Just another way for the government
                > to raise
                > funds, regardless of the reasons you often read. Google about, you
                > can find
                > a lot of information about these taxes online.
                > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stamp_duty
                >
                >
                > Bill
                >
                > -----Original Message-----
                > From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                > ] On
                > Behalf Of Julie Michutka
                > Sent: Sunday, July 11, 2010 8:07 AM
                > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                > Subject: Re: [S-R] 2 records questions
                >
                >
                > On Jul 10, 2010, at 11:27 PM, Michael Mojher wrote:
                >
                >> http://www.iabsi.com/gen/public/
                >> document_examples.htm#1929_Rodny_list Does your document look like
                >> the 1929 Birth Certificate on this page?
                >
                >
                > Same layout, but entirely handwritten rather than on a preprinted
                > form, and krstny list rather than rodny list; stamp is similar or
                > identical. I have no problems with translating the document, it's just
                > the use of the stamp. I can see how a baptismal extract could be used
                > as a legal (civil) proof of date of birth and be issued by the state
                > rather than the church. But what's the stamp for?
                >
                > I've seen similar on 18th century Welsh probate documents. Wondered
                > about it then, too. Stamps, showing that some small amount of money
                > was paid, on a legal document. Why a stamp, why a payment? If the
                > stamp is to prove payment, the second question still stands.
                >
                > Thanks for the translation of rodna kniha, and for the pointer to
                > Bill's site. I cruise through Bill's collection periodically, and
                > often turn there when I have a question, but I had forgotten that he
                > had document images.
                >
                > Julie
                >
                >
                >>
                >>
                >> From: Julie Michutka
                >> Sent: Saturday, July 10, 2010 7:57 PM
                >> To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                >> Subject: [S-R] 2 records questions
                >>
                >>
                >> My second question is about an apparently certified extract from a
                >> baptismal register--in other words, a birth/baptismal certificate
                >> from
                >> "the old country," issued about 40 years after the event. (I was
                >> looking at a black and white xerox.) In the lower corner was a stamp,
                >> noting a certain number of koruny--the paper lick-it-and-stick-it
                >> type
                >> of stamp, not an ink stamp; it resembles a postage stamp. I've seen
                >> this sort of thing before, it seems common enough to certified or
                >> official documents, but I've never really questioned just exactly
                >> what
                >> that stamp is. It seems to indicate some sort of payment (a few
                >> koruny, in this case), but also somehow contributes to it being an
                >> official document?
                >
                >
                > ------------------------------------
                >
                > To visit your group on the web, go to:
                > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS/
                >
                > To unsubscribe from this group, go to
                > http://www.yahoogroups.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS -or- send blank
                > email to
                > SLOVAK-ROOTS-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.comYahoo! Groups Links
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > ------------------------------------
                >
                > To visit your group on the web, go to:
                > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS/
                >
                > To unsubscribe from this group, go to http://www.yahoogroups.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS
                > -or- send blank email to SLOVAK-ROOTS-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.comYahoo
                > ! Groups Links
                >
                >
                >
              • Ben Sorensen
                Hi Julie, IF the stamp is the one I am thinking of, the stamp signifies that a necessary charge was paid- by purchasing the stamp. The word for this stamp is
                Message 7 of 7 , Jul 11, 2010
                  Hi Julie,
                  IF the stamp is the one I am thinking of, the stamp signifies that a necessary
                  charge was paid- by purchasing the stamp. The word for this stamp is "kolok" in
                  Slovak.


                  They are still used today- perhaps I should put my OWN paperwork into our files
                  so that we have also modern documents to work with as well. Seeing how something
                  is done today sheds light on the past....
                  BEn




                  ________________________________
                  From: Julie Michutka <jmm@...>
                  To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Sun, July 11, 2010 8:06:56 AM
                  Subject: Re: [S-R] 2 records questions

                   

                  On Jul 10, 2010, at 11:27 PM, Michael Mojher wrote:

                  > http://www.iabsi.com/gen/public/
                  > document_examples.htm#1929_Rodny_list Does your document look like
                  > the 1929 Birth Certificate on this page?

                  Same layout, but entirely handwritten rather than on a preprinted
                  form, and krstny list rather than rodny list; stamp is similar or
                  identical. I have no problems with translating the document, it's just
                  the use of the stamp. I can see how a baptismal extract could be used
                  as a legal (civil) proof of date of birth and be issued by the state
                  rather than the church. But what's the stamp for?

                  I've seen similar on 18th century Welsh probate documents. Wondered
                  about it then, too. Stamps, showing that some small amount of money
                  was paid, on a legal document. Why a stamp, why a payment? If the
                  stamp is to prove payment, the second question still stands.

                  Thanks for the translation of rodna kniha, and for the pointer to
                  Bill's site. I cruise through Bill's collection periodically, and
                  often turn there when I have a question, but I had forgotten that he
                  had document images.

                  Julie

                  >
                  >
                  > From: Julie Michutka
                  > Sent: Saturday, July 10, 2010 7:57 PM
                  > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                  > Subject: [S-R] 2 records questions
                  >
                  >
                  > My second question is about an apparently certified extract from a
                  > baptismal register--in other words, a birth/baptismal certificate from
                  > "the old country," issued about 40 years after the event. (I was
                  > looking at a black and white xerox.) In the lower corner was a stamp,
                  > noting a certain number of koruny--the paper lick-it-and-stick-it type
                  > of stamp, not an ink stamp; it resembles a postage stamp. I've seen
                  > this sort of thing before, it seems common enough to certified or
                  > official documents, but I've never really questioned just exactly what
                  > that stamp is. It seems to indicate some sort of payment (a few
                  > koruny, in this case), but also somehow contributes to it being an
                  > official document?






                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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