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Re: [S-R] Two last names for parents baptism records - anyone know the conven...

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  • Elaine
    I ran into a similar situation in some RC 1790s records for Kostolany. All of a sudden, there was a different priest, and he provided the names of the parents
    Message 1 of 2 , Jun 22, 2010
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      I ran into a similar situation in some RC 1790s records for
      Kostolany. All of a sudden, there was a different priest, and he
      provided the names of the parents of both the child's parents and
      those of the godparents! At first I thought the people all just had
      multiple names--he also provided alias names for lots of people--but
      finally I just started reading them the way you do some of the death
      records that contain multiple relations and relationships. (For
      instance, the first male name is the baby's father's name; the second
      is that man's father's first name, and the next name is the surname
      for all of them. Then the next name is the elder father's wife's first
      name, followed by her father's full name, then her morher's full name.
      Then you get the name of the new mother and use the same process to
      get her father's name and her mother's.)

      That priest was there for only about a year, and when the new priest
      began doing records, it was back to the old way where the wife's
      maiden name was not even listed. (All of a sudden, in the 18-teens,
      the priest started adding maiden names.)

      I was fortunate to have both some direct and indirect relatives born
      during the 1790s, and that provided invaluable info on earlier
      generations.

      Elaine

      Sent from my iPhone

      On Jun 22, 2010, at 3:30 PM, david1law@... wrote:

      > Yes, it could potentially be a mother's maiden name or a grandmother's
      > maiden name. I have seen this in my own family where a double
      > surname traced
      > back to a marriage in the early 1800's and the double surname was
      > used to
      > be able to distinguish between families in the same greater family
      > clan.
      > Further research will probably be needed to confirm.
      > I hope that this helps.
      >
      > Best regards,
      >
      > David
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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