Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [S-R] Re: Family Secrets

Expand Messages
  • Nancy Gibbs
    Family secrets don t have to go back very far.  My grandfather and one of his sister s were born in Slovakia.  Through my research, I found one of her sons
    Message 1 of 5 , May 2 11:09 AM
    • 0 Attachment
      Family secrets don't have to go back very far.  My grandfather and one of his sister's were born in Slovakia.  Through my research, I found one of her sons in PA.  I called him and he not only insisted his mother was born in PA, he wouldn't even consider that we were related.  I sent him a couple letters but did not get any response.  Now he is gone so I don't know if I will ever glean anything from my discovery.




      ________________________________
      From: Sue Roecker <sueroecker@...>
      To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Fri, April 30, 2010 4:34:35 PM
      Subject: [S-R] Re: Family Secrets

       
      For my mom's family - growing up in the coal regions of Carbon County, PA - she said that her parents spoke Slovak with each other and with the grandparents, but never taught her or her sisters to speak it. In fact they were encouraged to just focus on English. My mom said she was told that they didn't need to learn Slovak because they were American. Plus, it was a convenient way for the grandparents to have a conversation and be assured no one else would understand what was being discussed.

      Getting any information or details out of them regarding the "old country" was difficult. Same reason/excuse - they didn't remember or no one felt it was important to recall the past, etc......One way to get dialogue started with someone who doesn't want to bring up the past is to ask about a favorite food they remember - food has a way of bringing up fond memories - like grandmother' s awesome pirogies or what the best filling for Kolache is, etc....and soon enough the conversation turns to region, locality and relatives. Good luck.







      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • martha.andras
      Hi! Yes - Tresckow, PA is in Carbon County. It is just outside of Hazleton, PA (which is in Luzerne County). Interesting - last night my husband & I visited
      Message 2 of 5 , May 4 11:22 AM
      • 0 Attachment
        Hi!

        Yes - Tresckow, PA is in Carbon County. It is just outside of Hazleton, PA (which is in Luzerne County).

        Interesting - last night my husband & I visited his long-lost aunt who is 84 years old. Her father was born in Lozin, Slovakia. I showed her a wedding picture of her parents that she had never seen!

        We also discussed the Slovak/English language issue and she said they were never taught to speak Slovak - they had to speak English. Occasionally, when her parents wanted to discuss something privately, the two of them spoke Slovak but they were proud that they could speak English. Even though they were a poor, coal-mining family, their living conditions were luxurious compared to what her father left behind in Slovakia. He just wanted to leave everything in the past, including speaking the language. As has been said many times on this group - I don't think we have a clue as to what life was like for our ancestors. May they be enjoying their reward now!

        Martha

        --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, M Jenner <hawaiijenner@...> wrote:
        >
        > Is Treschow in Carbon County? That is where my grandfather was born and lived before his father moved on to central Pennsylvania coal mines.
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > ________________________________
        > From: Tara <aunttara@...>
        > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
        > Sent: Sat, May 1, 2010 2:10:34 PM
        > Subject: [S-R] Re: Family Secrets
        >
        >
        > Hi Sue
        >
        > Where in Carbon County did your mother's family live? I am from there and that is where a lot of my research is being done.
        >
        > tara
        >
        > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@ yahoogroups. com, Sue Roecker <sueroecker@ ...> wrote:
        > >
        > > For my mom's family - growing up in the coal regions of Carbon County, PA - she said that her parents spoke Slovak with each other and with the grandparents, but never taught her or her sisters to speak it. In fact they were encouraged to just focus on English. My mom said she was told that they didn't need to learn Slovak because they were American. Plus, it was a convenient way for the grandparents to have a conversation and be assured no one else would understand what was being discussed.
        > >
        > > Getting any information or details out of them regarding the "old country" was difficult. Same reason/excuse - they didn't remember or no one felt it was important to recall the past, etc......One way to get dialogue started with someone who doesn't want to bring up the past is to ask about a favorite food they remember - food has a way of bringing up fond memories - like grandmother' s awesome pirogies or what the best filling for Kolache is, etc....and soon enough the conversation turns to region, locality and relatives. Good luck.
        > >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.