Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [SLOVAK-ROOTS] Kosarko/Matyik family

Expand Messages
  • Andrea Vangor
    I knew some Kosarkos in Lakewood, California, during the 1960 s. One of them later worked for a radio network, I believe. The daughters were Diane and
    Message 1 of 6 , Oct 29, 2000
    • 0 Attachment
      I knew some Kosarkos in Lakewood, California, during the 1960's. One of
      them later worked for a radio network, I believe. The daughters were Diane
      and Cynthia, the elder. Not that this helps your inquiry, but they might be
      a branch of your family.

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "John Kosarko" <jkosar@...>
      To: <SLOVAK-ROOTS@egroups.com>
      Sent: Sunday, October 29, 2000 2:49 PM
      Subject: [SLOVAK-ROOTS] Kosarko/Matyik family


      > My father, Michael Kosarko, born 1882, and my mother, Barbara Matyik,
      > born 1895, came from Brataslavia in the early 1900's. My father's
      > brother Paul and sister Bertha came over later, My mother's brothers
      > Andy, Mike and Steve also came in the early 1900's. My mother came
      > over on the SS Rotterdam, not sure of the year. My father was
      > a "sharndarm", phonetic, pictures show him in a military type
      > uniform. If anyone can help, please be my guest. Thanks
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
    • caam704@aol.com
      In a message dated 10/29/00 2:50:37 PM Pacific Standard Time, ... John, This may sound very far fetched but it is a guess and only a guess. Sharndarm sounds
      Message 2 of 6 , Oct 29, 2000
      • 0 Attachment
        In a message dated 10/29/00 2:50:37 PM Pacific Standard Time,
        jkosar@... writes:

        > My father was
        > a "sharndarm", phonetic, pictures show him in a military type
        > uniform. If anyone can help, please be my guest. Thanks

        John,

        This may sound very far fetched but it is a guess and only a guess.
        "Sharndarm" sounds to me like the French word for cop and I don't know how to
        spell it but I think it begins with a geu. A French police officer looks
        very militaristic to my eye. Now in trying to explain a European would
        perhaps have a grasp of a few french words in attempting to explain his job.
        Somehow I don't think your father world have known the word "copper" other
        such term.


        See it you can find police uniforms of the period for Bratislava.

        Caam
      • Ron Matviyak
        Good shot, Caam! I have seen Gendarmerie in a Hungarian book and would swear I have seen in in Slovak references as well. There was a close relationship to
        Message 3 of 6 , Oct 29, 2000
        • 0 Attachment
          Good shot, Caam!

          I have seen "Gendarmerie" in a Hungarian book and would swear I have seen in
          in Slovak references as well. There was a close relationship to the French
          in some circles and borrowing words was quite common. A Bratislava
          policeman sounds like the right uniform to look for! Back then I suppose it
          was a Hungarian uniform in Posony. (the book shows the abbreviation of
          "Gendarmerie" as "Gend.")

          Ron


          ----- Original Message -----
          From: <caam704@...>
          To: <SLOVAK-ROOTS@egroups.com>
          Sent: Sunday, October 29, 2000 10:17 PM
          Subject: Re: [SLOVAK-ROOTS] Kosarko/Matyik family


          > In a message dated 10/29/00 2:50:37 PM Pacific Standard Time,
          > jkosar@... writes:
          >
          > > My father was
          > > a "sharndarm", phonetic, pictures show him in a military type
          > > uniform. If anyone can help, please be my guest. Thanks
          >
          > John,
          >
          > This may sound very far fetched but it is a guess and only a guess.
          > "Sharndarm" sounds to me like the French word for cop and I don't know how
          to
          > spell it but I think it begins with a geu. A French police officer looks
          > very militaristic to my eye. Now in trying to explain a European would
          > perhaps have a grasp of a few french words in attempting to explain his
          job.
          > Somehow I don't think your father world have known the word "copper" other
          > such term.
          >
          >
          > See it you can find police uniforms of the period for Bratislava.
          >
          > Caam
          >
          >
          >
          >
        • Jozef Porubcansky
          Before 1945, policeman in Slovakia was called z^anda r or s^anda r , phonetically shandar . Jozef ... From: To:
          Message 4 of 6 , Oct 29, 2000
          • 0 Attachment
            Before 1945, policeman in Slovakia was called "z^anda'r" or
            "s^anda'r", phonetically "shandar".

            Jozef

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: <caam704@...>
            To: <SLOVAK-ROOTS@egroups.com>
            Sent: Monday, October 30, 2000 8:17 AM
            Subject: Re: [SLOVAK-ROOTS] Kosarko/Matyik family


            > In a message dated 10/29/00 2:50:37 PM Pacific Standard Time,
            > jkosar@... writes:
            >
            > > My father was
            > > a "sharndarm", phonetic, pictures show him in a military type
            > > uniform. If anyone can help, please be my guest. Thanks
            >
            > John,
            >
            > This may sound very far fetched but it is a guess and only a guess.
            > "Sharndarm" sounds to me like the French word for cop and I don't know how
            to
            > spell it but I think it begins with a geu. A French police officer looks
            > very militaristic to my eye. Now in trying to explain a European would
            > perhaps have a grasp of a few french words in attempting to explain his
            job.
            > Somehow I don't think your father world have known the word "copper" other
            > such term.
            >
            >
            > See it you can find police uniforms of the period for Bratislava.
            >
            > Caam
            >
            >
            >
          • qt41059@aol.com
            The word you are looking for is Gendarme indeed it a term for a french police officer. Hope this helps Kate
            Message 5 of 6 , Oct 30, 2000
            • 0 Attachment
              The word you are looking for is "Gendarme" indeed it a term for a french
              police officer. Hope this helps
              Kate
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.