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Re: Zemplinska

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  • Frank Kurchina
    ... who is ... abjured his ... say ... but he ... (In Slovak zázvor is the spice and not a feminine first name. Actually the word comes from zingiber (L)
    Message 1 of 15 , Oct 25, 2000
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      --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@egroups.com, gkopka1@a... wrote:
      > Wow, what great information from this web site! Thank you all.
      > Then that would explain the fact that my grandfather, Mike Pavolko,
      who is
      > Slovak, has Austria named as the country that he renounced and
      abjured his
      > allegiance to in 1901on his naturalization certificate. He did not
      say
      > Austria-Hungary--just Austria. I suppose Slovaks lived in Austria,
      but he
      > just may have been from what is now Slovakia.
      > Thanks again.
      > Zazvor (aka Ginger)

      (In Slovak zázvor is the spice and not a feminine first name.
      Actually the word comes from zingiber (L) zindiberi (Gk)

      Francis Joseph I was Ausztriai császár (Emperor of Austria)
      and csehország királya (King of Bohemeia, which was also part of
      the Austro-Hungarian Empire)
      So GF could have been from either Czech-Bohemia or Slovakia ?

      Ferencz József (H) Franz Joseph (G)

      However, judging from 1900/1910 U.S. Census enumerations, Austria,
      Hungary, Austro-Hung, or AHE, were some of the various country of
      origin designations used.
      It wasn't until the 1920 U.S. Census that the post-WW I political
      territorial changes were addressed and Slovakland or Slovakia were
      listed as country of origin.
    • Bruce Bagin
      My grandfather s naturalization papers names Franz Joseph as Emperor of Austria and apostolic King of Hungary in 1914, bb ... From: Frank Kurchina
      Message 2 of 15 , Oct 25, 2000
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        My grandfather's naturalization papers names Franz Joseph as Emperor of
        Austria and apostolic King of Hungary in 1914,

        bb
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Frank Kurchina" <frankur@...>
        To: <SLOVAK-ROOTS@egroups.com>
        Sent: Wednesday, October 25, 2000 10:26 AM
        Subject: [SLOVAK-ROOTS] Re: Zemplinska


        > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@egroups.com, gkopka1@a... wrote:
        > > Wow, what great information from this web site! Thank you all.
        > > Then that would explain the fact that my grandfather, Mike Pavolko,
        > who is
        > > Slovak, has Austria named as the country that he renounced and
        > abjured his
        > > allegiance to in 1901on his naturalization certificate. He did not
        > say
        > > Austria-Hungary--just Austria. I suppose Slovaks lived in Austria,
        > but he
        > > just may have been from what is now Slovakia.
        > > Thanks again.
        > > Zazvor (aka Ginger)
        >
        > (In Slovak zázvor is the spice and not a feminine first name.
        > Actually the word comes from zingiber (L) zindiberi (Gk)
        >
        > Francis Joseph I was Ausztriai császár (Emperor of Austria)
        > and csehország királya (King of Bohemeia, which was also part of
        > the Austro-Hungarian Empire)
        > So GF could have been from either Czech-Bohemia or Slovakia ?
        >
        > Ferencz József (H) Franz Joseph (G)
        >
        > However, judging from 1900/1910 U.S. Census enumerations, Austria,
        > Hungary, Austro-Hung, or AHE, were some of the various country of
        > origin designations used.
        > It wasn't until the 1920 U.S. Census that the post-WW I political
        > territorial changes were addressed and Slovakland or Slovakia were
        > listed as country of origin.
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
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