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MUTNANSKY translations

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  • Judy/Dick James
    Thanks to all who offered help with translating the words from the church records of Ilava. I have just learned that one of the sisters was known as Louise in
    Message 1 of 5 , Oct 20, 2000
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      Thanks to all who offered help with translating the words from the church records of Ilava.

      I have just learned that one of the sisters was known as Louise in America. Do you think that could be a version of Aloysia?

      I didn't see any death records on the film I was viewing. Perhaps I missed them. There were marriage records and birth/baptism records.

      I am looking forward to viewing the next film.

      Thanks again to all who responded.
      Judy




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Frank Kurchina
      ... church records of Ilava. ... America. Do you think that could be a version of Aloysia? ... missed them. There were marriage records and birth/baptism
      Message 2 of 5 , Oct 21, 2000
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        --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@egroups.com, "Judy/Dick James" <jajames@c...>
        wrote:
        > Thanks to all who offered help with translating the words from the
        church records of Ilava.
        >
        > I have just learned that one of the sisters was known as Louise in
        America. Do you think that could be a version of Aloysia?
        >
        > I didn't see any death records on the film I was viewing. Perhaps I
        missed them. There were marriage records and birth/baptism records.
        >
        > I am looking forward to viewing the next film.
        >

        Yes.
        The feminine given name Aloysia can also be Louise.
        It is a very convoluted story for which I have lost all my
        documentation and remember only a few items.

        Aloysia is a 4-syllable girl's name of Teutonic origin, meaning:
        Famed.
        There was originally a Germanic male name meaning famed.
        Somewhere through history it was converted to the female name which
        is now known as Louise.
        The French adopted the female name and changed it to a male name
        Louis which they gave to many of there kings.
        Louise had about 4-5 versions of the A.....name, one of which was
        Aloysia.

        You have the three LDS R.C. microfilms (1673-1934) for Ilava.
        On film # 1981155 was an item, Death Records (1862-1900) titled
        Zomrelí in Slovak.
      • Judy/Dick James
        I am awaiting film # 1981155 and hope to find more information. Thanks for the information concerning the name Louise. One other word that I saw under the
        Message 3 of 5 , Oct 21, 2000
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          I am awaiting film # 1981155 and hope to find more information. Thanks for
          the information concerning the name Louise.

          One other word that I saw under the fathers name looked like "vachman"
          Does that translate to "watchman" and would that be a profession?

          Also, would there by any way of knowing what the most common route of
          emigration was for people leaving Ilava, Slovakia and going to America in
          the 1890-1910 period?

          This group has been most helpful with information. Thanks again to all of
          you.

          Judy


          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "Frank Kurchina" <frankur@...>
          To: <SLOVAK-ROOTS@egroups.com>
          Sent: Saturday, October 21, 2000 6:48 AM
          Subject: [SLOVAK-ROOTS] Re: MUTNANSKY translations


          > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@egroups.com, "Judy/Dick James" <jajames@c...>
          > wrote:
          > > Thanks to all who offered help with translating the words from the
          > church records of Ilava.
          > >
          > > I have just learned that one of the sisters was known as Louise in
          > America. Do you think that could be a version of Aloysia?
          > >
          > > I didn't see any death records on the film I was viewing. Perhaps I
          > missed them. There were marriage records and birth/baptism records.
          > >
          > > I am looking forward to viewing the next film.
          > >
          >
          > Yes.
          > The feminine given name Aloysia can also be Louise.
          > It is a very convoluted story for which I have lost all my
          > documentation and remember only a few items.
          >
          > Aloysia is a 4-syllable girl's name of Teutonic origin, meaning:
          > Famed.
          > There was originally a Germanic male name meaning famed.
          > Somewhere through history it was converted to the female name which
          > is now known as Louise.
          > The French adopted the female name and changed it to a male name
          > Louis which they gave to many of there kings.
          > Louise had about 4-5 versions of the A.....name, one of which was
          > Aloysia.
          >
          > You have the three LDS R.C. microfilms (1673-1934) for Ilava.
          > On film # 1981155 was an item, Death Records (1862-1900) titled
          > Zomrelí in Slovak.
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
        • Frank Kurchina
          ... Thanks for ... vachman ... I doubt it. Hungarian and Slovak don t use the letter w except in foreign words. A watchman in German would be a Wächter.
          Message 4 of 5 , Oct 21, 2000
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            --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@egroups.com, "Judy/Dick James" <jajames@c...>
            wrote:
            > I am awaiting film # 1981155 and hope to find more information.
            Thanks for
            > the information concerning the name Louise.
            >
            > One other word that I saw under the fathers name looked like
            "vachman"
            > Does that translate to "watchman" and would that be a profession?
            >

            I doubt it.
            Hungarian and Slovak don't use the letter w except in foreign words.
            A watchman in German would be a Wächter.
            Vachman transliterated to German would be Wachman.
            Occupation watchman is éjelio"r in Hungarian and noc^ny'
            stráz^nik
            in Slovak.


            > Also, would there by any way of knowing what the most common route
            of
            > emigration was for people leaving Ilava, Slovakia and going to
            America in
            > the 1890-1910 period?
            >

            Ilava to U.S.

            European ports of exit in order of probabality.

            1890
            Bremen
            Hamburg
            GERMANY
            Antwerp
            BELGIUM
            Rotterdam
            HOLLAND

            1900
            Bremen
            Hamburg
            GERMANY
            Antwerp
            BELGIUM
            Rotterdam
            HOLLAND

            1910
            Bremen
            Hamburg
            GERMANY
            Rotterdam
            HOLLAND
            Le Havre
            Cherbourg
            FRANCE


            Most probable U.S. ports of entry
            New York City
            Philadelphia or Baltimore
          • Tarzantu2@aol.com
            Judy, In 1905 my grandfather went from Tvarozna, Slovakia to Bremen, Germany to emigrate to America, entering in New York. He sailed on the Barbarosa. Ray
            Message 5 of 5 , Oct 21, 2000
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              Judy,
              In 1905 my grandfather went from Tvarozna, Slovakia to Bremen, Germany to
              emigrate to America, entering in New York. He sailed on the Barbarosa.

              Ray
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