Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [S-R] Re: long term storage of records

Expand Messages
  • lkocik@comcast.net
    I have a question about formats for archival storage, before this thread ends; If I understand jpeg...every time you open a file in this format it gets
    Message 1 of 13 , Dec 28, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      I have a question about formats for archival storage, before this thread ends;
      If I understand jpeg...every time you open a file in this format it gets "abbriviated", or redundant pixels are removed. I would imagine this only happens with files on a hard drive and not on a file stored on a disc.
      In any case; Is there a preferred format for long term storage. I realize size can be an issue with tiff and bit map, etc, but does anyone know if one format is more stable than the others over time.
      I agree also, that anything of value on a disc should be backed up with paper files.On this subject does anyone have an opinion on laminating documents to protect them from handling and long term storage.
      Thank you.
      Larry Kocik ...Kocich in Slovakia
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Don
      To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Mon, 28 Dec 2009 18:28:56 +0000 (UTC)
      Subject: [S-R] Re: long term storage of records

















      Hi Carl and everybody else,



      As has been noted, storing information by electronic media is temporary. Hard copy form seems the most likely to last the longest.



      For your own happiness, I'd like to suggest to you (and everybody else) to put it in the form of a book - not just a collection of papers in a looseleaf notebook, but a real hardcover BOOK. I think this may provide you with the most satisfaction.



      People toss out magazines and newspapers, but most people won't throw out a book. Books are held in higher regard. Sure, it'll take a little more work, and cost a little bit more, but the benefit of having your research 'official' in a book outweigh the extra work.



      I've been working on my own family history research for 9 years now. It will go into book form. It's about 2/3 done, but not completed mostly due to lack of sufficient time.



      I believe there is nothing to compare to holding your family history book in your own hands in a presentable form. Our ancestors deserve it.



      Even if there is nobody within your own branch interested in this family history, there are other branches that would surely have an interest - especially if their branch is included.



      You could also donate copies of the book to the various societies, etc.



      I would like to suggest looking on the internet for various 'Print on Demand' (POD) book publishers. These differ from so-called 'vanity publishers', which may require you to purchase 1000 books, or require a large amount of $$$ to print your book(s). Print on demand publishers will print as few as one book, at a reasonable price considering they are custom made.



      As one of the easier and more reasonably priced ones, I'd like to suggest you check out blurb.com - they have software you download, you enter your information and (digital) photos, then upload and order your book(s). You receive the books normally within two weeks of ordering them. Most people order color photo books, however there is a B&W text option. I have no connection with the company other than having used their service in the past for several smaller books.



      Depending upon format, size, and quantity of pages, the price can be anywhere between under $10 for a 40 page softcover B&W text book to about $100 for a 440 page hard cover full color text & photo book. I don't believe they have acid free paper available yet, which is a negative.



      Other websites have similar services, however blurb.com is the one I have chosen. Of course, investigate this website and others to determine which meets your needs.



      There's nothing like holding a REAL book in your hands. I've done several smaller books and am generally happy with them.



      I hope this helps you, and others.



      Don



      --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "Carl" <kotlarchik@...> wrote:


      >


      > I've asked a couple of people this question but have not had any responses. So, I'd like to ask the entire group for ideas on the subject.


      >


      > I've been actively researching my family records for a number of years and have developed a pretty large data base of information. More recently, I have begun to document and reference my material as I try to write up a narrative to go along with the data. This information includes stories, historical facts etc in an attempt to make it more interesting than just a collection of names and dates. It has surprised me how much information can be developed from the church, census and military records. Along with historical references, you can weave a pretty good story about your ancestors.


      >


      > My problem is what am I going to do with this information long term. There is no one in my family, including my children, who have a real interest in genealogy. So, there is a real danger that all that I have found will be lost again. But I would certainly like to provide some unknown future family historian with my reference material.


      >


      > I've moved around over time and now live in an area that has no real family connection. So, a local library or historical society doesn't seem like a place where my material should be stored (even if they would be willing to accept it). The same is true of the historical family homes. None of the family live there any more. Also, there is really no one in the family of historical significance. So, I'm assuming a larger institution would not have much interest in my records. And, I have found that some university collections place such restrictions on access to their records, that it makes it difficult or impossible for others to obtain them. So, what to do? I'm sure there are others in this forum with a similar situation. I would be very interested in what your plans are for your records or any other suggestions.


      > CK


      >








      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.