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long term storage of records

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  • Carl
    I ve asked a couple of people this question but have not had any responses. So, I d like to ask the entire group for ideas on the subject. I ve been actively
    Message 1 of 13 , Dec 27, 2009
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      I've asked a couple of people this question but have not had any responses. So, I'd like to ask the entire group for ideas on the subject.

      I've been actively researching my family records for a number of years and have developed a pretty large data base of information. More recently, I have begun to document and reference my material as I try to write up a narrative to go along with the data. This information includes stories, historical facts etc in an attempt to make it more interesting than just a collection of names and dates. It has surprised me how much information can be developed from the church, census and military records. Along with historical references, you can weave a pretty good story about your ancestors.

      My problem is what am I going to do with this information long term. There is no one in my family, including my children, who have a real interest in genealogy. So, there is a real danger that all that I have found will be lost again. But I would certainly like to provide some unknown future family historian with my reference material.

      I've moved around over time and now live in an area that has no real family connection. So, a local library or historical society doesn't seem like a place where my material should be stored (even if they would be willing to accept it). The same is true of the historical family homes. None of the family live there any more. Also, there is really no one in the family of historical significance. So, I'm assuming a larger institution would not have much interest in my records. And, I have found that some university collections place such restrictions on access to their records, that it makes it difficult or impossible for others to obtain them. So, what to do? I'm sure there are others in this forum with a similar situation. I would be very interested in what your plans are for your records or any other suggestions.
      CK
    • helene cincebeaux
      Hi Carl - Have you considered the CGSI Library (website cgsi.org) and the LDS Archives in Salt Lake City? helene ________________________________ From: Carl
      Message 2 of 13 , Dec 27, 2009
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        Hi Carl - Have you considered the CGSI Library (website cgsi.org) and the LDS Archives in Salt Lake City?

        helene



        ________________________________
        From: Carl <kotlarchik@...>
        To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Sun, December 27, 2009 11:35:22 AM
        Subject: [S-R] long term storage of records

         
        I've asked a couple of people this question but have not had any responses. So, I'd like to ask the entire group for ideas on the subject.

        I've been actively researching my family records for a number of years and have developed a pretty large data base of information. More recently, I have begun to document and reference my material as I try to write up a narrative to go along with the data. This information includes stories, historical facts etc in an attempt to make it more interesting than just a collection of names and dates. It has surprised me how much information can be developed from the church, census and military records. Along with historical references, you can weave a pretty good story about your ancestors.

        My problem is what am I going to do with this information long term. There is no one in my family, including my children, who have a real interest in genealogy. So, there is a real danger that all that I have found will be lost again. But I would certainly like to provide some unknown future family historian with my reference material.

        I've moved around over time and now live in an area that has no real family connection. So, a local library or historical society doesn't seem like a place where my material should be stored (even if they would be willing to accept it). The same is true of the historical family homes. None of the family live there any more. Also, there is really no one in the family of historical significance. So, I'm assuming a larger institution would not have much interest in my records. And, I have found that some university collections place such restrictions on access to their records, that it makes it difficult or impossible for others to obtain them. So, what to do? I'm sure there are others in this forum with a similar situation. I would be very interested in what your plans are for your records or any other suggestions.
        CK







        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Tom Geiss
        Carl, You have a problem similar to mine. No one else in the family with enthusiasm to match my own. What I am doing is sending the data that I
        Message 3 of 13 , Dec 27, 2009
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          Carl, You have a problem similar to mine. No one else in the family with enthusiasm to match my own. What I am doing is sending the data that I collect to many different people, as many as possible. And I usually tell them. "Even if you are too busy for this now, save it FOR POSTERITY, because someday, someone's grandchild, who may not even be born yet is going to get some curiosity about their ancestors"
          And, believe me, this will happen. My big regret is that I did not get interested 15 years earlier, when my sister was still alive, who was looking for these things.
          I will share with you a thank you card I just received from a niece. She wrote,"Jonathon nearly went crazy with joy at all the pictures and in-depth information you send regarding yours and my heritage ". and "Jonathan is a history scholar and lives for fascinating stories. He has traveled much of Europe"
          The thing is, you never know where the JONATHANS are?? So, spread it around, the more the better. A lot of people in my family think I overdo it. Most of them are more interested in the Super Bowl..
          Tom
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: Carl
          To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Sunday, December 27, 2009 10:35 AM
          Subject: [S-R] long term storage of records



          I've asked a couple of people this question but have not had any responses. So, I'd like to ask the entire group for ideas on the subject.

          I've been actively researching my family records for a number of years and have developed a pretty large data base of information. More recently, I have begun to document and reference my material as I try to write up a narrative to go along with the data. This information includes stories, historical facts etc in an attempt to make it more interesting than just a collection of names and dates. It has surprised me how much information can be developed from the church, census and military records. Along with historical references, you can weave a pretty good story about your ancestors.

          My problem is what am I going to do with this information long term. There is no one in my family, including my children, who have a real interest in genealogy. So, there is a real danger that all that I have found will be lost again. But I would certainly like to provide some unknown future family historian with my reference material.

          I've moved around over time and now live in an area that has no real family connection. So, a local library or historical society doesn't seem like a place where my material should be stored (even if they would be willing to accept it). The same is true of the historical family homes. None of the family live there any more. Also, there is really no one in the family of historical significance. So, I'm assuming a larger institution would not have much interest in my records. And, I have found that some university collections place such restrictions on access to their records, that it makes it difficult or impossible for others to obtain them. So, what to do? I'm sure there are others in this forum with a similar situation. I would be very interested in what your plans are for your records or any other suggestions.
          CK





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Michael Mojher
          This is from a universities guidelines for all of the electronic media. So the care and handling may not be something we can do. But to recopy the disks to
          Message 4 of 13 , Dec 27, 2009
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            This is from a universities guidelines for all of the electronic media. So the care and handling may not be something we can do. But to recopy the disks to keep the "fresh" is a good idea. My computer store has told horror stories about people using solid state devices and DVDs for storage and in as little as four years have them go blank.

            Storing Digital Media

            For records of long-term or enduring value stored on electronic media, we encourage state agencies and local governments to use the following guidelines:

            Recommended: Magnetic tapes or cartridges are preferred for the long-term storage of electronic records. CD-ROMs created with the ANSI 9660 standard can be used for long-term storage, as well. Remember that the storage capacity of a magnetic tape, however, far exceeds that of a CD-ROM. Regardless of your choice, both media require periodic "refreshing" (transfer to new media) within a pre-determined period of time. See "the care and handling of digital media" section below.

            Not recommended: Floppy disks, external hard drives, solid state devices, and DVDs.

            Care and handling of Digital Media

            All Media

            ? Purchase and use high quality storage media. Batch test new media to validate manufacturing quality.

            ? Read a statistical sample (3% minimum) of recorded media annually to identify and correct any loss of data. Re-copy batch if errors appear.



            From: Carl
            Sent: Sunday, December 27, 2009 8:35 AM
            To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [S-R] long term storage of records



            I've asked a couple of people this question but have not had any responses. So, I'd like to ask the entire group for ideas on the subject.

            I've been actively researching my family records for a number of years and have developed a pretty large data base of information. More recently, I have begun to document and reference my material as I try to write up a narrative to go along with the data. This information includes stories, historical facts etc in an attempt to make it more interesting than just a collection of names and dates. It has surprised me how much information can be developed from the church, census and military records. Along with historical references, you can weave a pretty good story about your ancestors.

            My problem is what am I going to do with this information long term. There is no one in my family, including my children, who have a real interest in genealogy. So, there is a real danger that all that I have found will be lost again. But I would certainly like to provide some unknown future family historian with my reference material.

            I've moved around over time and now live in an area that has no real family connection. So, a local library or historical society doesn't seem like a place where my material should be stored (even if they would be willing to accept it). The same is true of the historical family homes. None of the family live there any more. Also, there is really no one in the family of historical significance. So, I'm assuming a larger institution would not have much interest in my records. And, I have found that some university collections place such restrictions on access to their records, that it makes it difficult or impossible for others to obtain them. So, what to do? I'm sure there are others in this forum with a similar situation. I would be very interested in what your plans are for your records or any other suggestions.
            CK





            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • joanski
            Tom/Carl, Helene, et.al: My husband and I have discussed the question regarding long term STORAGE often. My husband has encouraged me to do my research for
            Message 5 of 13 , Dec 27, 2009
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              Tom/Carl, Helene, et.al:

              My husband and I have discussed the question regarding long term STORAGE often. My husband has encouraged me to do my research for myself and my own satisfaction, which is what I feel I'm doing. We've also questioned if any family (what's left of them) would really care about what I've found)? I've visualized my only child pitching out my collection of scraps/photos/clippings as junk. The relatives I've talked to care nothing about our family history and that's putting it mildly. I will hope for my own "Jonathan" to surface some time.

              Helene, what would the LDS group do with all one's research, archive it on microfiche? If one donates their information then it is the responsibility of the researcher to let future interested parties know where the information resides? Guess that is all Tom/Carl/and me can do? And yes Tom, most are interested in the Super Bowl.

              Best,

              JB


              On Dec 27, 2009, at 10:53 AM, Tom Geiss wrote:

              > Carl, You have a problem similar to mine. No one else in the family with enthusiasm to match my own. What I am doing is sending the data that I collect to many different people, as many as possible. And I usually tell them. "Even if you are too busy for this now, save it FOR POSTERITY, because someday, someone's grandchild, who may not even be born yet is going to get some curiosity about their ancestors"
              > And, believe me, this will happen. My big regret is that I did not get interested 15 years earlier, when my sister was still alive, who was looking for these things.
              > I will share with you a thank you card I just received from a niece. She wrote,"Jonathon nearly went crazy with joy at all the pictures and in-depth information you send regarding yours and my heritage ". and "Jonathan is a history scholar and lives for fascinating stories. He has traveled much of Europe"
              > The thing is, you never know where the JONATHANS are?? So, spread it around, the more the better. A lot of people in my family think I overdo it. Most of them are more interested in the Super Bowl..
              > Tom
              > ----- Original Message -----
              > From: Carl
              > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
              > Sent: Sunday, December 27, 2009 10:35 AM
              > Subject: [S-R] long term storage of records
              >
              > I've asked a couple of people this question but have not had any responses. So, I'd like to ask the entire group for ideas on the subject.
              >
              > I've been actively researching my family records for a number of years and have developed a pretty large data base of information. More recently, I have begun to document and reference my material as I try to write up a narrative to go along with the data. This information includes stories, historical facts etc in an attempt to make it more interesting than just a collection of names and dates. It has surprised me how much information can be developed from the church, census and military records. Along with historical references, you can weave a pretty good story about your ancestors.
              >
              > My problem is what am I going to do with this information long term. There is no one in my family, including my children, who have a real interest in genealogy. So, there is a real danger that all that I have found will be lost again. But I would certainly like to provide some unknown future family historian with my reference material.
              >
              > I've moved around over time and now live in an area that has no real family connection. So, a local library or historical society doesn't seem like a place where my material should be stored (even if they would be willing to accept it). The same is true of the historical family homes. None of the family live there any more. Also, there is really no one in the family of historical significance. So, I'm assuming a larger institution would not have much interest in my records. And, I have found that some university collections place such restrictions on access to their records, that it makes it difficult or impossible for others to obtain them. So, what to do? I'm sure there are others in this forum with a similar situation. I would be very interested in what your plans are for your records or any other suggestions.
              > CK
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Bill Tarkulich
              Carl, I spent a decade in the computer backup business. Here is my two cents. For those that have the luxury of unlimited funds, the IT guidelines are the way
              Message 6 of 13 , Dec 27, 2009
              • 0 Attachment
                Carl,
                I spent a decade in the computer backup business. Here is my two cents.
                For those that have the luxury of unlimited funds, the IT guidelines are the
                way to go. The majority of genealogy researchers are on limited incomes
                and must make some compromises.

                Truth be told, the best archival methods today is either microfilm or
                archival-quality paper.

                I'd discourage against the use of tapes, having used them for home backup
                for 15 years.
                - The data on tapes begins to fade after about 10 years. At some point, it
                becomes unreadable.
                - If written on low-quality tape drives, it will fade even sooner.
                - Tapes are a lot more expensive than CDs and DVDs. As much as $25 each.
                - Tape drives are expensive.
                - Tapes are very fickle beasts and result in a lot of failures and
                babysitting.
                - Tapes are great when you have an IT department which spends all day
                attending to backups.

                - CDs and DVDs last a lot longer, but you've probably accumulated a lot of
                stuff, it's going to take multiple disks to save everything.

                How I deal with it:
                I have an two external drives with a backup program, it runs every Friday
                night. I have protection against catastrophic failures.

                I make a CD or DVD once a year and put it in my safe deposit box. Protects
                me from theft and fire. It's out of the house.

                I have made CD's of the most essential documents and gave them to my cousins
                siblings. I just asked them to save them for me, they don't need to even
                look at them. I even gave a copy to cousins in Slovakia. I agree, hardly
                anyone else is interested. "Too much" research, is a subjective opinion, I
                would ignore the comment. Some day maybe one of their children will become
                curious and the torch will pass.


                I have a ton of non-family books, maps, etc. My expectation is that I will
                donate or ask my estate to donate them to the Carpatho-Rusyn Society.
                Helene's idea of donating is excellent.

                With regard to the FHL. They are developing a new method of inputting the
                data. There are a lot of minefields in the public storage of private data.
                First is privacy. You've probably documented a lot of living relatives -
                that cannot be published. Then there is an issue of accuracy. The FHL had
                a lot of garbage put into their original project by patrons and it became
                fairly useless.


                In this day and age when it is easy to copy paper and electronic, I vote for
                making as many copies as you can and distributing them with the hope that
                some day one of the seeds will germinated.

                That's my two cents.


                Bill


                -----Original Message-----
                From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com] On
                Behalf Of Carl
                Sent: Sunday, December 27, 2009 11:35 AM
                To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: [S-R] long term storage of records

                I've asked a couple of people this question but have not had any responses.
                So, I'd like to ask the entire group for ideas on the subject.

                I've been actively researching my family records for a number of years and
                have developed a pretty large data base of information. More recently, I
                have begun to document and reference my material as I try to write up a
                narrative to go along with the data. This information includes stories,
                historical facts etc in an attempt to make it more interesting than just a
                collection of names and dates. It has surprised me how much information can
                be developed from the church, census and military records. Along with
                historical references, you can weave a pretty good story about your
                ancestors.

                My problem is what am I going to do with this information long term. There
                is no one in my family, including my children, who have a real interest in
                genealogy. So, there is a real danger that all that I have found will be
                lost again. But I would certainly like to provide some unknown future
                family historian with my reference material.

                I've moved around over time and now live in an area that has no real family
                connection. So, a local library or historical society doesn't seem like a
                place where my material should be stored (even if they would be willing to
                accept it). The same is true of the historical family homes. None of the
                family live there any more. Also, there is really no one in the family of
                historical significance. So, I'm assuming a larger institution would not
                have much interest in my records. And, I have found that some university
                collections place such restrictions on access to their records, that it
                makes it difficult or impossible for others to obtain them. So, what to do?
                I'm sure there are others in this forum with a similar situation. I would
                be very interested in what your plans are for your records or any other
                suggestions.
                CK



                ------------------------------------

                To visit your group on the web, go to:
                http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS/

                To unsubscribe from this group, go to
                http://www.yahoogroups.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS -or- send blank email to
                SLOVAK-ROOTS-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.comYahoo! Groups Links
              • Mary Murin
                ... I go with Bill about keeping records on paper. I recently read an article in a magazine (unfortunarely,I don t remeber which), about how quickly software
                Message 7 of 13 , Dec 27, 2009
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                  --- On Sun, 12/27/09, Bill Tarkulich <bill.tarkulich@...> wrote:


                  I go with Bill about keeping records on paper. I recently read an article in a magazine (unfortunarely,I don't remeber which), about how quickly software becomes obsolete. Not too long ago, everybody had floppy disks--my computer doesn't even have a floppy disk drive. Look at VHS--who records on tape anymore or plays tapes? Good quality paper stored properly will last a long, long time. It's easy to make as many copies as you want with your printer, and anybody can read it who is literate and knows the language--no special equipment needed.
                   

                  From: Bill Tarkulich <bill.tarkulich@...>
                  Subject: RE: [S-R] long term storage of records
                  To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Sunday, December 27, 2009, 2:09 PM


                  Carl,
                  I spent a decade in the computer backup business.  Here is my two cents.
                  For those that have the luxury of unlimited funds, the IT guidelines are the
                  way to go.   The majority of genealogy researchers are on limited incomes
                  and must make some compromises.

                  Truth be told, the best archival methods today is either microfilm or
                  archival-quality paper.

                  I'd discourage against the use of tapes, having used them for home backup
                  for 15 years.
                  - The data on tapes begins to fade after about 10 years.  At some point, it
                  becomes unreadable. 
                  - If written on low-quality tape drives, it will fade even sooner. 
                  - Tapes are a lot more expensive than CDs and DVDs.   As much as $25 each.
                  - Tape drives are expensive.
                  - Tapes are very fickle beasts and result in a lot of failures and
                  babysitting.
                  - Tapes are great when you have an IT department which spends all day
                  attending to backups.

                  - CDs and DVDs last a lot longer, but you've probably accumulated a lot of
                  stuff, it's going to take multiple disks to save everything.

                  How I deal with it:
                  I have an two external drives with a backup program, it runs every Friday
                  night.  I have protection against catastrophic failures.

                  I make a CD or DVD once a year and put it in my safe deposit box.  Protects
                  me from theft and fire.  It's out of the house.

                  I have made CD's of the most essential documents and gave them to my cousins
                  siblings.  I just asked them to save them for me, they don't need to even
                  look at them.  I even gave a copy to cousins in Slovakia.  I agree, hardly
                  anyone else is interested.  "Too much" research, is a subjective opinion, I
                  would ignore the comment.  Some day maybe one of their children will become
                  curious and the torch will pass.


                  I have a ton of non-family books, maps, etc.  My expectation is that I will
                  donate or ask my estate to donate them to the Carpatho-Rusyn Society.
                  Helene's idea of donating is excellent.

                  With regard to the FHL.  They are developing a new method of inputting the
                  data.  There are a lot of minefields in the public storage of private data.
                  First is privacy.  You've probably documented a lot of living relatives -
                  that cannot be published.  Then there is an issue of accuracy.  The FHL had
                  a lot of garbage put into their original project by patrons and it became
                  fairly useless.


                  In this day and age when it is easy to copy paper and electronic, I vote for
                  making as many copies as you can and  distributing them with the hope that
                  some day one of the seeds will germinated.

                  That's my two cents.


                  Bill


                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com] On
                  Behalf Of Carl
                  Sent: Sunday, December 27, 2009 11:35 AM
                  To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: [S-R] long term storage of records

                  I've asked a couple of people this question but have not had any responses.
                  So, I'd like to ask the entire group for ideas on the subject.

                  I've been actively researching my family records for a number of years and
                  have developed a pretty large data base of information.  More recently, I
                  have begun to document and reference my material as I try to write up a
                  narrative to go along with the data.  This information includes stories,
                  historical facts etc in an attempt to make it more interesting than just a
                  collection of names and dates.  It has surprised me how much information can
                  be developed from the church, census and military records.  Along with
                  historical references, you can weave a pretty good story about your
                  ancestors. 

                  My problem is what am I going to do with this information long term.  There
                  is no one in my family, including my children, who have a real interest in
                  genealogy.  So, there is a real danger that all that I have found will be
                  lost again.  But I would certainly like to provide some unknown future
                  family historian with my reference material. 

                  I've moved around over time and now live in an area that has no real  family
                  connection.  So, a local library or historical society doesn't seem like a
                  place where my material should be stored (even if they would be willing to
                  accept it).  The same is true of the historical family homes.  None of the
                  family live there any more.  Also, there is really no one in the family of
                  historical significance.  So, I'm assuming a larger institution would not
                  have much interest in my records.  And, I have found that some university
                  collections place such restrictions on access to their records, that it
                  makes it difficult or impossible for others to obtain them.  So, what to do?
                  I'm sure there are others in this forum with a similar situation.  I would
                  be very interested in what your plans are for your records or any other
                  suggestions.
                  CK



                  ------------------------------------

                  To visit your group on the web, go to:
                      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS/

                  To unsubscribe from this group, go to
                  http://www.yahoogroups.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS%c2%a0 -or- send  blank email to
                  SLOVAK-ROOTS-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.comYahoo! Groups Links







                  ------------------------------------

                  To visit your group on the web, go to:
                      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS/

                  To unsubscribe from this group, go to http://www.yahoogroups.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS%c2%a0 -or- send  blank email to SLOVAK-ROOTS-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.comYahoo! Groups Links








                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Carl
                  Helene, Thanks for your suggestions. I don t believe that the CGSI library participates in the Inter Library Loan program. That means that any future
                  Message 8 of 13 , Dec 27, 2009
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Helene,
                    Thanks for your suggestions.
                    I don't believe that the CGSI library participates in the Inter Library Loan program. That means that any future researcher has to go to their location which I believe is in Minnesota. I'm hoping to find someplace with better access. I need to learn more about the LDS archives. I just don't know enough about them yet.
                    Carl



                    --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, helene cincebeaux <helenezx@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Hi Carl - Have you considered the CGSI Library (website cgsi.org) and the LDS Archives in Salt Lake City?
                    >
                    > helene
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > ________________________________
                    > From: Carl <kotlarchik@...>
                    > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                    > Sent: Sun, December 27, 2009 11:35:22 AM
                    > Subject: [S-R] long term storage of records
                    >
                    >  
                    > I've asked a couple of people this question but have not had any responses. So, I'd like to ask the entire group for ideas on the subject.
                    >
                    > I've been actively researching my family records for a number of years and have developed a pretty large data base of information. More recently, I have begun to document and reference my material as I try to write up a narrative to go along with the data. This information includes stories, historical facts etc in an attempt to make it more interesting than just a collection of names and dates. It has surprised me how much information can be developed from the church, census and military records. Along with historical references, you can weave a pretty good story about your ancestors.
                    >
                    > My problem is what am I going to do with this information long term. There is no one in my family, including my children, who have a real interest in genealogy. So, there is a real danger that all that I have found will be lost again. But I would certainly like to provide some unknown future family historian with my reference material.
                    >
                    > I've moved around over time and now live in an area that has no real family connection. So, a local library or historical society doesn't seem like a place where my material should be stored (even if they would be willing to accept it). The same is true of the historical family homes. None of the family live there any more. Also, there is really no one in the family of historical significance. So, I'm assuming a larger institution would not have much interest in my records. And, I have found that some university collections place such restrictions on access to their records, that it makes it difficult or impossible for others to obtain them. So, what to do? I'm sure there are others in this forum with a similar situation. I would be very interested in what your plans are for your records or any other suggestions.
                    > CK
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                  • Carl
                    Bill, Tom, Joan, Mary Thanks for your thoughts. I was not really asking what media should be used for the long term storage of my records. I have felt for a
                    Message 9 of 13 , Dec 27, 2009
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                      Bill, Tom, Joan, Mary
                      Thanks for your thoughts. I was not really asking what media should be used for the long term storage of my records. I have felt for a long time that only hard copies (paper and photographic film/paper) are the only media with any real life. We had a rule at the company where I worked that any electronic media would only have a maximum life of 20 years. Also, given the problems with digital media evolution, it is hard to keep a format that can survive for very long. (Can any body still read their floppy disks?) For my own purposes, I backup weekly on an external hard drive and on CDs periodically. But I'm not planning on giving those to some future researcher. I'm counting on providing only hardcopy.

                      My question was really, who do you give it to. I have given copies of documents and my personal write-ups to many of my relatives. And some have been really grateful and sincerely interested. But I sense that no one is really interested in continuing the work. So, I want to make sure that when that person finally comes along, they will have access to all my work.

                      My wife has been an avid genealogist for over 30 years. She has a number of family lines that extend to the late 1600s in America. Consequently, she has dragged me all over this country to universities and historical societies that have collections of her family documents. Some of these institutions are very good about allowing researchers access to their collections and have allowed me to photograph hundreds of records and books. But others are very restrictive. They won't allow the coping of complete sets of records and prohibit the eventual sharing of any of their records with another institution. This is what I'm trying to avoid. I want future researchers to have easy access and free use of any of my work. My wife has a couple of places that she plans to use for the long term storage of her research. Unfortunately, they don't have "Slovak" collections that I know of. :>)

                      Anyway, maybe the best idea is to just make multiple copies and give them to as many relatives who are interested as possible.
                      Thanks everyone for thoughts and suggestions.
                      Carl K

                      --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "Bill Tarkulich" <bill.tarkulich@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Carl,
                      > I spent a decade in the computer backup business. Here is my two cents.
                      > For those that have the luxury of unlimited funds, the IT guidelines are the
                      > way to go. The majority of genealogy researchers are on limited incomes
                      > and must make some compromises.
                      >
                      > Truth be told, the best archival methods today is either microfilm or
                      > archival-quality paper.
                      >
                      > I'd discourage against the use of tapes, having used them for home backup
                      > for 15 years.
                      > - The data on tapes begins to fade after about 10 years. At some point, it
                      > becomes unreadable.
                      > - If written on low-quality tape drives, it will fade even sooner.
                      > - Tapes are a lot more expensive than CDs and DVDs. As much as $25 each.
                      > - Tape drives are expensive.
                      > - Tapes are very fickle beasts and result in a lot of failures and
                      > babysitting.
                      > - Tapes are great when you have an IT department which spends all day
                      > attending to backups.
                      >
                      > - CDs and DVDs last a lot longer, but you've probably accumulated a lot of
                      > stuff, it's going to take multiple disks to save everything.
                      >
                      > How I deal with it:
                      > I have an two external drives with a backup program, it runs every Friday
                      > night. I have protection against catastrophic failures.
                      >
                      > I make a CD or DVD once a year and put it in my safe deposit box. Protects
                      > me from theft and fire. It's out of the house.
                      >
                      > I have made CD's of the most essential documents and gave them to my cousins
                      > siblings. I just asked them to save them for me, they don't need to even
                      > look at them. I even gave a copy to cousins in Slovakia. I agree, hardly
                      > anyone else is interested. "Too much" research, is a subjective opinion, I
                      > would ignore the comment. Some day maybe one of their children will become
                      > curious and the torch will pass.
                      >
                      >
                      > I have a ton of non-family books, maps, etc. My expectation is that I will
                      > donate or ask my estate to donate them to the Carpatho-Rusyn Society.
                      > Helene's idea of donating is excellent.
                      >
                      > With regard to the FHL. They are developing a new method of inputting the
                      > data. There are a lot of minefields in the public storage of private data.
                      > First is privacy. You've probably documented a lot of living relatives -
                      > that cannot be published. Then there is an issue of accuracy. The FHL had
                      > a lot of garbage put into their original project by patrons and it became
                      > fairly useless.
                      >
                      >
                      > In this day and age when it is easy to copy paper and electronic, I vote for
                      > making as many copies as you can and distributing them with the hope that
                      > some day one of the seeds will germinated.
                      >
                      > That's my two cents.
                      >
                      >
                      > Bill
                      >
                      >
                      > -----Original Message-----
                      > From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com] On
                      > Behalf Of Carl
                      > Sent: Sunday, December 27, 2009 11:35 AM
                      > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                      > Subject: [S-R] long term storage of records
                      >
                      > I've asked a couple of people this question but have not had any responses.
                      > So, I'd like to ask the entire group for ideas on the subject.
                      >
                      > I've been actively researching my family records for a number of years and
                      > have developed a pretty large data base of information. More recently, I
                      > have begun to document and reference my material as I try to write up a
                      > narrative to go along with the data. This information includes stories,
                      > historical facts etc in an attempt to make it more interesting than just a
                      > collection of names and dates. It has surprised me how much information can
                      > be developed from the church, census and military records. Along with
                      > historical references, you can weave a pretty good story about your
                      > ancestors.
                      >
                      > My problem is what am I going to do with this information long term. There
                      > is no one in my family, including my children, who have a real interest in
                      > genealogy. So, there is a real danger that all that I have found will be
                      > lost again. But I would certainly like to provide some unknown future
                      > family historian with my reference material.
                      >
                      > I've moved around over time and now live in an area that has no real family
                      > connection. So, a local library or historical society doesn't seem like a
                      > place where my material should be stored (even if they would be willing to
                      > accept it). The same is true of the historical family homes. None of the
                      > family live there any more. Also, there is really no one in the family of
                      > historical significance. So, I'm assuming a larger institution would not
                      > have much interest in my records. And, I have found that some university
                      > collections place such restrictions on access to their records, that it
                      > makes it difficult or impossible for others to obtain them. So, what to do?
                      > I'm sure there are others in this forum with a similar situation. I would
                      > be very interested in what your plans are for your records or any other
                      > suggestions.
                      > CK
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > ------------------------------------
                      >
                      > To visit your group on the web, go to:
                      > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS/
                      >
                      > To unsubscribe from this group, go to
                      > http://www.yahoogroups.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS -or- send blank email to
                      > SLOVAK-ROOTS-unsubscribe@...! Groups Links
                      >
                    • helene cincebeaux
                      good question and i don t know the answer - i know they did contact me one time about our family genealogy to ask if it could be used by others - this was a
                      Message 10 of 13 , Dec 27, 2009
                      • 0 Attachment
                        good question and i don't know the answer - i know they did contact me one time about our family genealogy to ask if it could be used by others - this was a number of years ago. In light of today's didgital age it would be a good thing to ask and find out how they handle donations today.

                        totally agree that we may be doing this for someone not yet born who will bless us - i hope!

                        That's why I am sitting at the computer day and night for months now creating my Slovak Traditions book as I was able to gather all this info and must share it with others who won't have this opportunity as so many of the people are gone.

                        helene





                        ________________________________
                        From: joanski <joanski@...>
                        To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Sun, December 27, 2009 1:46:03 PM
                        Subject: Re: [S-R] long term storage of records

                        Tom/Carl, Helene, et.al:

                        My husband and I have discussed the question regarding long term STORAGE often.  My husband has encouraged me to do my research for myself and my own satisfaction, which is what I feel I'm doing.  We've also questioned if any family (what's left of them) would really care about what I've found)?  I've visualized my only child pitching out my collection of scraps/photos/clippings as junk.  The relatives I've talked to care nothing about  our family history  and that's putting it mildly.  I will hope for my own "Jonathan" to surface some time. 

                        Helene, what would the LDS group do with all one's research, archive it on microfiche?  If one donates their information then it is the responsibility of the researcher to let future interested parties know where the information resides?  Guess that is all Tom/Carl/and me can do?  And yes Tom, most are interested in the Super Bowl. 

                        Best,

                        JB


                        On Dec 27, 2009, at 10:53 AM, Tom Geiss wrote:

                        > Carl, You have a problem similar to mine. No one else in the family with enthusiasm to match my own. What I am doing is sending the data that I collect to many different people, as many as possible. And I usually tell them. "Even if you are too busy for this now, save it FOR POSTERITY, because someday, someone's grandchild, who may not even be born yet is going to get some curiosity about their ancestors"
                        > And, believe me, this will happen. My big regret is that I did not get interested 15 years earlier, when my sister was still alive, who was looking for these things.
                        > I will share with you a thank you card I just received from a niece. She wrote,"Jonathon nearly went crazy with joy at all the pictures and in-depth information you send regarding yours and my heritage ". and "Jonathan is a history scholar and lives for fascinating stories. He has traveled much of Europe"
                        > The thing is, you never know where the JONATHANS are?? So, spread it around, the more the better. A lot of people in my family think I overdo it. Most of them are more interested in the Super Bowl..
                        > Tom
                        > ----- Original Message -----
                        > From: Carl
                        > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                        > Sent: Sunday, December 27, 2009 10:35 AM
                        > Subject: [S-R] long term storage of records
                        >
                        > I've asked a couple of people this question but have not had any responses. So, I'd like to ask the entire group for ideas on the subject.
                        >
                        > I've been actively researching my family records for a number of years and have developed a pretty large data base of information. More recently, I have begun to document and reference my material as I try to write up a narrative to go along with the data. This information includes stories, historical facts etc in an attempt to make it more interesting than just a collection of names and dates. It has surprised me how much information can be developed from the church, census and military records. Along with historical references, you can weave a pretty good story about your ancestors.
                        >
                        > My problem is what am I going to do with this information long term. There is no one in my family, including my children, who have a real interest in genealogy. So, there is a real danger that all that I have found will be lost again. But I would certainly like to provide some unknown future family historian with my reference material.
                        >
                        > I've moved around over time and now live in an area that has no real family connection. So, a local library or historical society doesn't seem like a place where my material should be stored (even if they would be willing to accept it). The same is true of the historical family homes. None of the family live there any more. Also, there is really no one in the family of historical significance. So, I'm assuming a larger institution would not have much interest in my records. And, I have found that some university collections place such restrictions on access to their records, that it makes it difficult or impossible for others to obtain them. So, what to do? I'm sure there are others in this forum with a similar situation. I would be very interested in what your plans are for your records or any other suggestions.
                        > CK
                        >
                        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        >
                        >



                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



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                            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS/

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                      • liese niedermayer
                        Great information. Though I only have so much information than others I do put the work I ve done on a blog. I scan photos and my written work (poetry etc.)
                        Message 11 of 13 , Dec 27, 2009
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Great information. Though I only have so much information than others I do put the work I've done on a blog. I scan photos and my written work (poetry etc.) into the venues such as email folders and to other family members. Of course I print out my work and send it to relatives with a request to keep the info in good hands. It's up to them. Again I only have 3 years worth of work unlike others with 15+ years to gather.



                          To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                          From: bill.tarkulich@...
                          Date: Sun, 27 Dec 2009 14:09:50 -0500
                          Subject: RE: [S-R] long term storage of records





                          Carl,
                          I spent a decade in the computer backup business. Here is my two cents.
                          For those that have the luxury of unlimited funds, the IT guidelines are the
                          way to go. The majority of genealogy researchers are on limited incomes
                          and must make some compromises.

                          Truth be told, the best archival methods today is either microfilm or
                          archival-quality paper.

                          I'd discourage against the use of tapes, having used them for home backup
                          for 15 years.
                          - The data on tapes begins to fade after about 10 years. At some point, it
                          becomes unreadable.
                          - If written on low-quality tape drives, it will fade even sooner.
                          - Tapes are a lot more expensive than CDs and DVDs. As much as $25 each.
                          - Tape drives are expensive.
                          - Tapes are very fickle beasts and result in a lot of failures and
                          babysitting.
                          - Tapes are great when you have an IT department which spends all day
                          attending to backups.

                          - CDs and DVDs last a lot longer, but you've probably accumulated a lot of
                          stuff, it's going to take multiple disks to save everything.

                          How I deal with it:
                          I have an two external drives with a backup program, it runs every Friday
                          night. I have protection against catastrophic failures.

                          I make a CD or DVD once a year and put it in my safe deposit box. Protects
                          me from theft and fire. It's out of the house.

                          I have made CD's of the most essential documents and gave them to my cousins
                          siblings. I just asked them to save them for me, they don't need to even
                          look at them. I even gave a copy to cousins in Slovakia. I agree, hardly
                          anyone else is interested. "Too much" research, is a subjective opinion, I
                          would ignore the comment. Some day maybe one of their children will become
                          curious and the torch will pass.

                          I have a ton of non-family books, maps, etc. My expectation is that I will
                          donate or ask my estate to donate them to the Carpatho-Rusyn Society.
                          Helene's idea of donating is excellent.

                          With regard to the FHL. They are developing a new method of inputting the
                          data. There are a lot of minefields in the public storage of private data.
                          First is privacy. You've probably documented a lot of living relatives -
                          that cannot be published. Then there is an issue of accuracy. The FHL had
                          a lot of garbage put into their original project by patrons and it became
                          fairly useless.

                          In this day and age when it is easy to copy paper and electronic, I vote for
                          making as many copies as you can and distributing them with the hope that
                          some day one of the seeds will germinated.

                          That's my two cents.

                          Bill

                          -----Original Message-----
                          From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com] On
                          Behalf Of Carl
                          Sent: Sunday, December 27, 2009 11:35 AM
                          To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                          Subject: [S-R] long term storage of records

                          I've asked a couple of people this question but have not had any responses.
                          So, I'd like to ask the entire group for ideas on the subject.

                          I've been actively researching my family records for a number of years and
                          have developed a pretty large data base of information. More recently, I
                          have begun to document and reference my material as I try to write up a
                          narrative to go along with the data. This information includes stories,
                          historical facts etc in an attempt to make it more interesting than just a
                          collection of names and dates. It has surprised me how much information can
                          be developed from the church, census and military records. Along with
                          historical references, you can weave a pretty good story about your
                          ancestors.

                          My problem is what am I going to do with this information long term. There
                          is no one in my family, including my children, who have a real interest in
                          genealogy. So, there is a real danger that all that I have found will be
                          lost again. But I would certainly like to provide some unknown future
                          family historian with my reference material.

                          I've moved around over time and now live in an area that has no real family
                          connection. So, a local library or historical society doesn't seem like a
                          place where my material should be stored (even if they would be willing to
                          accept it). The same is true of the historical family homes. None of the
                          family live there any more. Also, there is really no one in the family of
                          historical significance. So, I'm assuming a larger institution would not
                          have much interest in my records. And, I have found that some university
                          collections place such restrictions on access to their records, that it
                          makes it difficult or impossible for others to obtain them. So, what to do?
                          I'm sure there are others in this forum with a similar situation. I would
                          be very interested in what your plans are for your records or any other
                          suggestions.
                          CK

                          ------------------------------------

                          To visit your group on the web, go to:
                          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS/

                          To unsubscribe from this group, go to
                          http://www.yahoogroups.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS -or- send blank email to
                          SLOVAK-ROOTS-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.comYahoo! Groups Links





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                          Hotmail: Free, trusted and rich email service.
                          http://clk.atdmt.com/GBL/go/171222984/direct/01/

                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Don
                          Hi Carl and everybody else, As has been noted, storing information by electronic media is temporary. Hard copy form seems the most likely to last the longest.
                          Message 12 of 13 , Dec 28, 2009
                          • 0 Attachment
                            Hi Carl and everybody else,

                            As has been noted, storing information by electronic media is temporary. Hard copy form seems the most likely to last the longest.

                            For your own happiness, I'd like to suggest to you (and everybody else) to put it in the form of a book - not just a collection of papers in a looseleaf notebook, but a real hardcover BOOK. I think this may provide you with the most satisfaction.

                            People toss out magazines and newspapers, but most people won't throw out a book. Books are held in higher regard. Sure, it'll take a little more work, and cost a little bit more, but the benefit of having your research 'official' in a book outweigh the extra work.

                            I've been working on my own family history research for 9 years now. It will go into book form. It's about 2/3 done, but not completed mostly due to lack of sufficient time.

                            I believe there is nothing to compare to holding your family history book in your own hands in a presentable form. Our ancestors deserve it.

                            Even if there is nobody within your own branch interested in this family history, there are other branches that would surely have an interest - especially if their branch is included.

                            You could also donate copies of the book to the various societies, etc.

                            I would like to suggest looking on the internet for various 'Print on Demand' (POD) book publishers. These differ from so-called 'vanity publishers', which may require you to purchase 1000 books, or require a large amount of $$$ to print your book(s). Print on demand publishers will print as few as one book, at a reasonable price considering they are custom made.

                            As one of the easier and more reasonably priced ones, I'd like to suggest you check out blurb.com - they have software you download, you enter your information and (digital) photos, then upload and order your book(s). You receive the books normally within two weeks of ordering them. Most people order color photo books, however there is a B&W text option. I have no connection with the company other than having used their service in the past for several smaller books.

                            Depending upon format, size, and quantity of pages, the price can be anywhere between under $10 for a 40 page softcover B&W text book to about $100 for a 440 page hard cover full color text & photo book. I don't believe they have acid free paper available yet, which is a negative.

                            Other websites have similar services, however blurb.com is the one I have chosen. Of course, investigate this website and others to determine which meets your needs.

                            There's nothing like holding a REAL book in your hands. I've done several smaller books and am generally happy with them.

                            I hope this helps you, and others.

                            Don

                            --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "Carl" <kotlarchik@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > I've asked a couple of people this question but have not had any responses. So, I'd like to ask the entire group for ideas on the subject.
                            >
                            > I've been actively researching my family records for a number of years and have developed a pretty large data base of information. More recently, I have begun to document and reference my material as I try to write up a narrative to go along with the data. This information includes stories, historical facts etc in an attempt to make it more interesting than just a collection of names and dates. It has surprised me how much information can be developed from the church, census and military records. Along with historical references, you can weave a pretty good story about your ancestors.
                            >
                            > My problem is what am I going to do with this information long term. There is no one in my family, including my children, who have a real interest in genealogy. So, there is a real danger that all that I have found will be lost again. But I would certainly like to provide some unknown future family historian with my reference material.
                            >
                            > I've moved around over time and now live in an area that has no real family connection. So, a local library or historical society doesn't seem like a place where my material should be stored (even if they would be willing to accept it). The same is true of the historical family homes. None of the family live there any more. Also, there is really no one in the family of historical significance. So, I'm assuming a larger institution would not have much interest in my records. And, I have found that some university collections place such restrictions on access to their records, that it makes it difficult or impossible for others to obtain them. So, what to do? I'm sure there are others in this forum with a similar situation. I would be very interested in what your plans are for your records or any other suggestions.
                            > CK
                            >
                          • lkocik@comcast.net
                            I have a question about formats for archival storage, before this thread ends; If I understand jpeg...every time you open a file in this format it gets
                            Message 13 of 13 , Dec 28, 2009
                            • 0 Attachment
                              I have a question about formats for archival storage, before this thread ends;
                              If I understand jpeg...every time you open a file in this format it gets "abbriviated", or redundant pixels are removed. I would imagine this only happens with files on a hard drive and not on a file stored on a disc.
                              In any case; Is there a preferred format for long term storage. I realize size can be an issue with tiff and bit map, etc, but does anyone know if one format is more stable than the others over time.
                              I agree also, that anything of value on a disc should be backed up with paper files.On this subject does anyone have an opinion on laminating documents to protect them from handling and long term storage.
                              Thank you.
                              Larry Kocik ...Kocich in Slovakia
                              ----- Original Message -----
                              From: Don
                              To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                              Sent: Mon, 28 Dec 2009 18:28:56 +0000 (UTC)
                              Subject: [S-R] Re: long term storage of records

















                              Hi Carl and everybody else,



                              As has been noted, storing information by electronic media is temporary. Hard copy form seems the most likely to last the longest.



                              For your own happiness, I'd like to suggest to you (and everybody else) to put it in the form of a book - not just a collection of papers in a looseleaf notebook, but a real hardcover BOOK. I think this may provide you with the most satisfaction.



                              People toss out magazines and newspapers, but most people won't throw out a book. Books are held in higher regard. Sure, it'll take a little more work, and cost a little bit more, but the benefit of having your research 'official' in a book outweigh the extra work.



                              I've been working on my own family history research for 9 years now. It will go into book form. It's about 2/3 done, but not completed mostly due to lack of sufficient time.



                              I believe there is nothing to compare to holding your family history book in your own hands in a presentable form. Our ancestors deserve it.



                              Even if there is nobody within your own branch interested in this family history, there are other branches that would surely have an interest - especially if their branch is included.



                              You could also donate copies of the book to the various societies, etc.



                              I would like to suggest looking on the internet for various 'Print on Demand' (POD) book publishers. These differ from so-called 'vanity publishers', which may require you to purchase 1000 books, or require a large amount of $$$ to print your book(s). Print on demand publishers will print as few as one book, at a reasonable price considering they are custom made.



                              As one of the easier and more reasonably priced ones, I'd like to suggest you check out blurb.com - they have software you download, you enter your information and (digital) photos, then upload and order your book(s). You receive the books normally within two weeks of ordering them. Most people order color photo books, however there is a B&W text option. I have no connection with the company other than having used their service in the past for several smaller books.



                              Depending upon format, size, and quantity of pages, the price can be anywhere between under $10 for a 40 page softcover B&W text book to about $100 for a 440 page hard cover full color text & photo book. I don't believe they have acid free paper available yet, which is a negative.



                              Other websites have similar services, however blurb.com is the one I have chosen. Of course, investigate this website and others to determine which meets your needs.



                              There's nothing like holding a REAL book in your hands. I've done several smaller books and am generally happy with them.



                              I hope this helps you, and others.



                              Don



                              --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "Carl" <kotlarchik@...> wrote:


                              >


                              > I've asked a couple of people this question but have not had any responses. So, I'd like to ask the entire group for ideas on the subject.


                              >


                              > I've been actively researching my family records for a number of years and have developed a pretty large data base of information. More recently, I have begun to document and reference my material as I try to write up a narrative to go along with the data. This information includes stories, historical facts etc in an attempt to make it more interesting than just a collection of names and dates. It has surprised me how much information can be developed from the church, census and military records. Along with historical references, you can weave a pretty good story about your ancestors.


                              >


                              > My problem is what am I going to do with this information long term. There is no one in my family, including my children, who have a real interest in genealogy. So, there is a real danger that all that I have found will be lost again. But I would certainly like to provide some unknown future family historian with my reference material.


                              >


                              > I've moved around over time and now live in an area that has no real family connection. So, a local library or historical society doesn't seem like a place where my material should be stored (even if they would be willing to accept it). The same is true of the historical family homes. None of the family live there any more. Also, there is really no one in the family of historical significance. So, I'm assuming a larger institution would not have much interest in my records. And, I have found that some university collections place such restrictions on access to their records, that it makes it difficult or impossible for others to obtain them. So, what to do? I'm sure there are others in this forum with a similar situation. I would be very interested in what your plans are for your records or any other suggestions.


                              > CK


                              >








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