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Re: The Name Stephen Hungarian Slovak

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  • Paul Guzowski
    Stastny novy rok. Dennis brings up some good points. Name changing among our ancestors who immigrated to the US in former times was very common, and this was
    Message 1 of 3 , Dec 27, 2009
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      Stastny novy rok.

      Dennis brings up some good points. Name changing among our ancestors
      who immigrated to the US in former times was very common, and this was
      especially true for names that have no English equivalent. That said, I
      found a couple of references that said the Hungarian Lászlo was
      equivalent to Lesley/Lesly in English.

      As for womens' married names in Hungary, this is potentially really
      confusing to genealogical researchers and I had a hard time with it for
      a long time when I lived and worked in Budapest. Here's an excerpt from
      Wikipedia that explains it pretty well. If you want to read more, I've
      included the link as well.

      "There is a wide range of selection of a married name. Up to about the
      18th century noblewomen kept their names at marriage and their children
      received their father's name. (Poor people usually did not have a last
      name at all[citation needed]; it became compulsory only under the reign
      of Joseph II). When Hungary was under Habsburg rule and became
      influenced by Western European traditions, women became known by their
      husbands' names. So for example Szendrey Júlia, marrying Petőfi Sándor,
      became Petőfi Sándorné (the -né suffix approximately means "wife of",
      and this is the Hungarian equivalent of "Mrs. John Smith"). This was
      both the law and the tradition until the 1950s. During the Communist
      rule of Hungary, great emphasis was put upon the equality of women and
      men, and from that time women could either choose to keep their maiden
      name or take that of their husband. But most women did take their
      husbands' names; most of the exceptions were artists.[citation needed]

      Nowadays the alternatives for a woman when she marries are as shown
      below (using the examples of Szendrey Júlia and Petőfi Sándor – Júlia
      and Sándor are their given names):

      * Júlia can keep her maiden name, as Szendrey Júlia (now very
      popular, especially among more-educated women).
      * Júlia gives up her name, adds the suffix -né to her husband's
      full name, and will be called Petőfi Sándorné.
      * Júlia adds the suffix -né to her husband's family name, adds her
      full name and will be called Petőfiné Szendrey Júlia.
      * Júlia adds the suffix -né to her husband's full name, adds her
      full name and will be called Petőfi Sándorné Szendrey Júlia
      (less popular these days, because it is long to write).
      * Júlia takes her husband's family name, keeps her given name
      "Júlia" and will be called Petőfi Júlia.
      *

      You can read more here:
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hungarian_names#Married_names

      Hope this helps a little to unravel the naming mysteries.

      Paul in NW FL
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