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Re: [S-R] The Name Stephen Hungarian Slovak

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  • david1law@aol.com
    Dear Karen: The following is a link to the website BEHIND THE NAME: THE ETYMOLOGY AND HISTORY OF FIRST NAMES _www.behindthename.com_
    Message 1 of 3 , Dec 25, 2009
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      Dear Karen:

      The following is a link to the website BEHIND THE NAME: THE ETYMOLOGY AND
      HISTORY OF FIRST NAMES

      _www.behindthename.com_ (http://www.behindthename.com)

      It is an excellent site and gives the different variants of a given name.
      Variants in spelling occur because of different pronunciations, different
      inflections, etc. in the different languages, and in a number of instances,
      the form in which the name appears depends upon the writer's language.

      In my research, I've seen my ancestors' names appear in Latin, German,
      Hungarian, and Slovak forms, and this is quite common because the various
      records were kept in these different languages.

      I hope that this helps a little.

      I wish everyone a very Merry Christmas and a Happy, Healthy, Safe, and
      Prosperous New Year!

      Best regards,

      David Baloga


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • haluska
      My G-Grandfather was Vasily. I have seen his name as Vasil,Vasyl,Karol,Karoly,Charles,Charlie and on his passenger list he was Laszlo! Like David said the
      Message 2 of 3 , Dec 26, 2009
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        My G-Grandfather was Vasily. I have seen his name as
        Vasil,Vasyl,Karol,Karoly,Charles,Charlie and on his passenger list he
        was Laszlo!

        Like David said the region and who was recording his name at the time
        pretty much determined what he was known as.

        If it is a female member of your family you seek records for. Look for
        an "NE" ending to her Husbands name on Hungarian documents as well.

        An example would be "Janosne" Meaning basically, wife of Janos.

        Behind the name is a good site but keep in mind that there is room for
        interpretation....

        Vasil and Laszlo do not transliterate. The definition as in my case was
        the answer......

        VASILY: Variant spelling of Russian Vasiliy, meaning "king."

        LASZLO: Hungarian form of Slavic Vladislav, meaning "rules with glory."

        VLADISLAV : Slavic name composed of the elements vlado "to rule" and
        slav "glory," hence "rules with glory." In use by the Bulgarians,
        Russians and Serbians.

        I wish I knew all that when I began my seaches. It would have saved tons
        of time!

        Good Luck,

        Dennis




        --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, david1law@... wrote:
        >
        > Dear Karen:
        >
        > The following is a link to the website BEHIND THE NAME: THE ETYMOLOGY
        AND
        > HISTORY OF FIRST NAMES
        >
        > _www.behindthename.com_ (http://www.behindthename.com)
        >
        > It is an excellent site and gives the different variants of a given
        name.
        > Variants in spelling occur because of different pronunciations,
        different
        > inflections, etc. in the different languages, and in a number of
        instances,
        > the form in which the name appears depends upon the writer's language.
        >
        > In my research, I've seen my ancestors' names appear in Latin, German,
        > Hungarian, and Slovak forms, and this is quite common because the
        various
        > records were kept in these different languages.
        >
        > I hope that this helps a little.
        >
        > I wish everyone a very Merry Christmas and a Happy, Healthy, Safe, and
        > Prosperous New Year!
        >
        > Best regards,
        >
        > David Baloga
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • Paul Guzowski
        Stastny novy rok. Dennis brings up some good points. Name changing among our ancestors who immigrated to the US in former times was very common, and this was
        Message 3 of 3 , Dec 27, 2009
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          Stastny novy rok.

          Dennis brings up some good points. Name changing among our ancestors
          who immigrated to the US in former times was very common, and this was
          especially true for names that have no English equivalent. That said, I
          found a couple of references that said the Hungarian Lászlo was
          equivalent to Lesley/Lesly in English.

          As for womens' married names in Hungary, this is potentially really
          confusing to genealogical researchers and I had a hard time with it for
          a long time when I lived and worked in Budapest. Here's an excerpt from
          Wikipedia that explains it pretty well. If you want to read more, I've
          included the link as well.

          "There is a wide range of selection of a married name. Up to about the
          18th century noblewomen kept their names at marriage and their children
          received their father's name. (Poor people usually did not have a last
          name at all[citation needed]; it became compulsory only under the reign
          of Joseph II). When Hungary was under Habsburg rule and became
          influenced by Western European traditions, women became known by their
          husbands' names. So for example Szendrey Júlia, marrying Petőfi Sándor,
          became Petőfi Sándorné (the -né suffix approximately means "wife of",
          and this is the Hungarian equivalent of "Mrs. John Smith"). This was
          both the law and the tradition until the 1950s. During the Communist
          rule of Hungary, great emphasis was put upon the equality of women and
          men, and from that time women could either choose to keep their maiden
          name or take that of their husband. But most women did take their
          husbands' names; most of the exceptions were artists.[citation needed]

          Nowadays the alternatives for a woman when she marries are as shown
          below (using the examples of Szendrey Júlia and Petőfi Sándor – Júlia
          and Sándor are their given names):

          * Júlia can keep her maiden name, as Szendrey Júlia (now very
          popular, especially among more-educated women).
          * Júlia gives up her name, adds the suffix -né to her husband's
          full name, and will be called Petőfi Sándorné.
          * Júlia adds the suffix -né to her husband's family name, adds her
          full name and will be called Petőfiné Szendrey Júlia.
          * Júlia adds the suffix -né to her husband's full name, adds her
          full name and will be called Petőfi Sándorné Szendrey Júlia
          (less popular these days, because it is long to write).
          * Júlia takes her husband's family name, keeps her given name
          "Júlia" and will be called Petőfi Júlia.
          *

          You can read more here:
          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hungarian_names#Married_names

          Hope this helps a little to unravel the naming mysteries.

          Paul in NW FL
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