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Photocopy/Photograph Records

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  • Diana Boggs
    Hi, I am researching a history book about the Hungarian Vizsla (pointing dog breed) which according to Count Bela Hadik says the Vizsla was created as the
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 21, 2009
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      Hi, I am researching a history book about the Hungarian Vizsla (pointing dog breed) which according to Count Bela Hadik says the Vizsla was created as the Magyars came INTO the Carpathian Pass in an area today that is known as Slovakia & not on the Hungarian Plains. In 1920 when Hungary was broken up, several stud books were formed & all except the Slovakian registry was lost. Which is partly why I have belonged to this listserv for several years. That and you guys are a constant historical source of information. This winter I will need to really track down the nuts & bolts of specific peoples & I couldn't write a complete enough history without studying genealogy, whether it be Slovakia or Magyar.
       
      Getting back to the subject at hand (photographing films with megapixel cameras), I have been depending heavily on my digital camera. The lady is right, be careful to make sure you have good exposure as it wastes too much time to go back after the fact to track your mistake down.
       
      Yes, photography does save more money than photo copying but divying up photos in Photoshop is VERY time consuming & if you print then you spend ten times as much in paper & ink putting in hard copy. I love my camera, but I am old school & want a piece of paper in front of me too.
       
      So if it can be easily photocopied, I do so. If I am short on research/visit time or item is a lugubrious size or needs protecting by not being handled, I photograph. I have found that compromise between digital & photocopy seems to work best on that neck twist that I live with every time I go on a research rampage.
       
      And then if you want to protect your time/love of the past research, back up your pc, make two copies of hard copy, two CD's/DVDs of data & store off site in case of disaster. The Internet is great but a year ago last September when Hurricane Ike struck the midwest (totally out of hurricane range) and the electric grids were knocked out. We got no gas, no ATM, no purchases, no Internet, no digital photos. I kept right on researching with my hard copy stuff by flashlight.
       
      When historicans research us years from now, how does one dig around & find the Internet? I say .....hard copy rocks. dlb




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