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RE: [S-R] Re: Genealogy research --Repak/Kovalesjcsik

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  • Mike Repak
    Curt Thanks for the response. I actually started subscribing to ancestry.com a few weeks ago when my interest in this was resurrected. I think I may have
    Message 1 of 11 , Jun 17, 2009
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      Curt



      Thanks for the response. I actually started subscribing to ancestry.com a
      few weeks ago when my interest in this was resurrected. I think I may have
      actually posted some of the info you saw. I thought I had found Charles &
      Mary's marriage certificate at one point, but it turned out to be Mary's
      cousin with the same name. I need to update that record to take that date
      off. Charles, my grandfather, seems to have had two sons with the name
      Charles. One, an infant died in 1912 & I had always been told his name was
      Michael. I got his death certificate which is how I found out the
      discrepancy with respect to his name. The 2nd son named Charles was born in
      1914 & died in 1930. My dad knew him & spoke often of him as my dad was 5
      yrs younger (so looked up to Charlie #2 as his big brother). I've contacted
      through ancestry.com 2 other people who had my grandfather in their family
      trees. One responded but didn't have anything else on him (it turned out we
      were 3rd cousins, so that was kind of interesting though). The other never
      replied (or at least hasn't yet). Thanks again for your response to my
      posting.



      Mike



      _____

      From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com] On
      Behalf Of Curt Bochanyin
      Sent: Wednesday, June 17, 2009 10:11 PM
      To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [S-R] Re: Genealogy research --Repak/Kovalesjcsik








      Mike,
      Do you have access either personally or in a library to ancestry.com??

      There are three separate persons that have created detailed family trees
      that have listed your Grandfather Repak. One includes dates and places of
      birth, date and place of marriage and date of death. Curiously, each of the
      trees lists a different date of death. Nevertheless, the creators of trees
      give their contact addresses. This is probably going to be the fastest way
      to get your information, and also contact other family you may not know.

      Curt B.

      > I'm trying to find out information about my father's father. He died in
      1919 when my dad was just an infant, so dad never got to know him. His name
      was Charles M. Repak and we believe that he was born in Austria-Hungary
      around 1889. I've been able to obtain his U.S. naturalization certificate
      which indicates that he arrived in NYC in 1895. I have a wedding picture of
      he and my grandmother, Mary Marcsisak (sometimes spelled Marcisak) but I
      don't know the date of marriage. She arrived in NYC on July 11, 1905 and was
      single when she arrived. She came from Litmanova in what is now the Slovak
      Republic. I also have obtained Charles' death certificate from NYC Bureau of
      Records. In handwriting that is not completely legible his parents are
      identified as Joseph Repak and Tesi Kovalesjcsik. My dad had always told me
      that Joseph Repak had died when Charles was young (so I can't be certain
      that he made it to NYC with Charles & Tesi). I also recall my father telling
      me that Tesi remarried a man with a name that sounded like "Dorax" and had
      other children. He also said that the family Americanized their name to
      "Drew." Dad believed that Mr. Dorax may have abandoned his family & moved to
      Pennsylvania. He recalls that his grandmother, Tesi lived in his
      neighborhood in lower Manhattan when he was young (in the 1920's & '30's).
      Charles was naturalized at Camp Upton in Suffolk County, NY, but otherwise I
      believe his spent his time in the US in Manhattan. I have had no luck in
      obtaining Tesi's death certificate through searching a couple of databases.
      I don't have a date of death or location (although I am assuming it would be
      either Manhattan or Brooklyn). Also, I can't be certain of the spelling of
      her name as I've seen plenty of misspellings of names in official documents.
      >
      > Thanks in advance for any help you can provide me in uncovering any
      further information about either Charles or Tesi.
      >
      > Mike Repak
      >





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • johnqadam
      When searching for genealogical information, knowing the birth village is paramount because records are organized by village not nationally, so it is not
      Message 2 of 11 , Jun 17, 2009
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        When searching for genealogical information, knowing the birth village is paramount because records are organized by village not nationally, so it is not possible to search on a national basis. It is also necessary to know the religion.

        >>> His name was Charles M. REPAK and we believe that he was born in Austria-Hungary around 1889. . . . arrived in NYC in 1895. <<<

        Not found on Ellis island but Cisarik has references to three Slovak Repak priests. The key to success is determining the Repak birth village.

        >>> Mary Marcsisak . . . arrived in NYC on July 11, 1905 and was single when she arrived. She came from Litmanova <<<

        LDS has available the GC church records from Litmanova and also the very useful 1869 Hungarian Census. If the Repak family originated in Litmanovce, you might find them in the 1869 census, along with Marcsisak.

        It's a start.
      • Mike Repak
        Thanks for your response. On Charles Petition for US Naturalization he lists his birthplace as Yamberia Austria, but on his WW1 Draft Registration card it s
        Message 3 of 11 , Jun 17, 2009
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          Thanks for your response. On Charles' Petition for US Naturalization he
          lists his birthplace as Yamberia Austria, but on his WW1 Draft Registration
          card it's written as something that looks like "Bukmir" Austria-Hungary. I
          took a quick look at these but will have to revisit now that I realize how
          important this will be for this research. Dad & I were baptized into the
          Byzantine Rite of the Catholic Church which was loyal to the Pope but had
          many traditions in common with the Orthodox church. Of course, I can't be
          sure if that was Charles' religion as well, but the death certificate
          indicates that he was buried at Calvary Cemetary in Queens which was largely
          Catholic at that time at least.



          I had found a very interesting website on Litmanova. Here's the address, in
          case any other member needs it: http://nbenyo.ipower.com/



          Thanks for the info on the 1869 census. I noticed that the group page in
          Yahoo has some info that may help me penetrate the language barrier in using
          the records.



          Please excuse my newbie ignorance, but what is Cisarik & how can this be
          accessed?



          Mike Repak



          _____

          From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com] On
          Behalf Of johnqadam
          Sent: Wednesday, June 17, 2009 10:33 PM
          To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [S-R] Re: Genealogy research --Repak/Kovalesjcsik








          When searching for genealogical information, knowing the birth village is
          paramount because records are organized by village not nationally, so it is
          not possible to search on a national basis. It is also necessary to know the
          religion.

          >>> His name was Charles M. REPAK and we believe that he was born in
          Austria-Hungary around 1889. . . . arrived in NYC in 1895. <<<

          Not found on Ellis island but Cisarik has references to three Slovak Repak
          priests. The key to success is determining the Repak birth village.

          >>> Mary Marcsisak . . . arrived in NYC on July 11, 1905 and was single when
          she arrived. She came from Litmanova <<<

          LDS has available the GC church records from Litmanova and also the very
          useful 1869 Hungarian Census. If the Repak family originated in Litmanovce,
          you might find them in the 1869 census, along with Marcsisak.

          It's a start.





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Michael Mojher
          Mike, The prime piece of information needed in genealogy is location , what village did your relatives come from. By knowing where and the religion it is
          Message 4 of 11 , Jun 17, 2009
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            Mike,
            The prime piece of information needed in genealogy is "location", what village did your relatives come from. By knowing where and the religion it is possible to find the records on your family.
            I am sending you information on the surnames you listed. What I am pasting in is the results of a hunt through a census done in Slovakia in 1995. They did this extensive census after becoming an independent country in 1993.
            There were 155 people with the name Repak in Slovakia and they were located in 46 locations. The top locations are given. The first word is the name of the town (in blue) or a district of a larger town (in black), "obec" is the name of the town. Next is the "okr" or orkes the district or county. The "od. r" gives the name of the district/county before a given date. The "numberX" is the number of people named Repak found in that town.
            From this list you can see that a large number of lived in Roznava County (45). It gives you a starting point for your search.
            Priezvisko REPÁK sa na Slovensku v roku 1995 nachádzalo 155×, celkový pocet lokalít: 46, najcastejsie výskyty v lokalitách:
            REVÚCA, okr. ROZNAVA (od r. 1996 REVÚCA) - 25×;
            MOKRÁ LÚKA, okr. ROZNAVA (od r. 1996 REVÚCA) - 10×;
            NIZNÁ MYSLA, okr. KOSICE-VIDIEK (od r. 1996 KOSICE - OKOLIE) - 8×;
            ZÁKOPCIE STRED (obec ZÁKOPCIE), okr. CADCA - 8×;
            ZILINA, okr. ZILINA - 7×;
            HNÚSTA, okr. RIMAVSKÁ SOBOTA - 6×;
            VYSNÁ MYSLA, okr. KOSICE-VIDIEK (od r. 1996 KOSICE - OKOLIE) - 6×;
            MURÁN, okr. ROZNAVA (od r. 1996 REVÚCA) - 5×;
            REVÚCKA (obec REVÚCA), okr. ROZNAVA (od r. 1996 REVÚCA) - 5×;
            U HOLÝCH (obec ZÁKOPCIE), okr. CADCA - 5×;

            There was no listing for Marcsisak. So it appears that Marcisak is the correct spelling. Here two spellings are given because of dialect marks. I know Litmanova, it is within 15 miles of my paternal ancestral village. Since Litmanova is not on the list, Stara Lubovna and Kamienka are the two closest towns. With only 24 Marcisak listed, it makes it a somewhat rare surname.

            Priezvisko MARCISÁK sa na Slovensku v roku 1995 nachádzalo 2×, celkový pocet lokalít: 1, v lokalitách:
            BELÁ NAD CIROCHOU, okr. HUMENNÉ (od r. 1996 SNINA) - 2×;

            --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
            Priezvisko MARCISÁK sa na Slovensku v roku 1995 nachádzalo 22×, celkový pocet lokalít: 11, v lokalitách:
            OLSAVICA, okr. SPISSKÁ NOVÁ VES (od r. 1996 LEVOCA) - 7×;
            POPRAD, okr. POPRAD - 3×;
            SPISSKÉ PODHRADIE, okr. SPISSKÁ NOVÁ VES (od r. 1996 LEVOCA) - 3×;
            GYNOV, okr. KOSICE-VIDIEK (od r. 1996 KOSICE - OKOLIE) - 2×;
            SEMSA, okr. KOSICE-VIDIEK (od r. 1996 KOSICE - OKOLIE) - 1×;
            KAMIENKA, okr. STARÁ LUBOVNA - 1×;
            KEZMAROK, okr. POPRAD (od r. 1996 KEZMAROK) - 1×;
            LEVOCA, okr. SPISSKÁ NOVÁ VES (od r. 1996 LEVOCA) - 1×;
            STARÁ LUBOVNA, okr. STARÁ LUBOVNA - 1×;
            STARÉ MESTO (obec BRATISLAVA), okr. BRATISLAVA - 1×;
            NAD JAZEROM (obec KOSICE), okr. KOSICE - 1×;

            There was no listings or alternatives for the surname Kovalesjcsik. And no listing at Ellis Island with that spelling.

            From Ellis Island, no Maria under Marcisak.

            1 Marcsisak, Maria 13 1881 1894
            2 Marcsisak, Maria Likn...c...ova, Hungary 17 1888 1905


            From: mrepak
            Sent: Wednesday, June 17, 2009 6:30 PM
            To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [S-R] Genealogy research --Repak/Kovalesjcsik





            I'm trying to find out information about my father's father. He died in 1919 when my dad was just an infant, so dad never got to know him. His name was Charles M. Repak and we believe that he was born in Austria-Hungary around 1889. I've been able to obtain his U.S. naturalization certificate which indicates that he arrived in NYC in 1895. I have a wedding picture of he and my grandmother, Mary Marcsisak (sometimes spelled Marcisak) but I don't know the date of marriage. She arrived in NYC on July 11, 1905 and was single when she arrived. She came from Litmanova in what is now the Slovak Republic. I also have obtained Charles' death certificate from NYC Bureau of Records. In handwriting that is not completely legible his parents are identified as Joseph Repak and Tesi Kovalesjcsik. My dad had always told me that Joseph Repak had died when Charles was young (so I can't be certain that he made it to NYC with Charles & Tesi). I also recall my father telling me that Tesi remarried a man with a name that sounded like "Dorax" and had other children. He also said that the family Americanized their name to "Drew." Dad believed that Mr. Dorax may have abandoned his family & moved to Pennsylvania. He recalls that his grandmother, Tesi lived in his neighborhood in lower Manhattan when he was young (in the 1920's & '30's). Charles was naturalized at Camp Upton in Suffolk County, NY, but otherwise I believe his spent his time in the US in Manhattan. I have had no luck in obtaining Tesi's death certificate through searching a couple of databases. I don't have a date of death or location (although I am assuming it would be either Manhattan or Brooklyn). Also, I can't be certain of the spelling of her name as I've seen plenty of misspellings of names in official documents.

            Thanks in advance for any help you can provide me in uncovering any further information about either Charles or Tesi.

            Mike Repak





            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Michael Mojher
            Mike, Here is the link to Juraj Cisarik s website: http://www.cisarik.com/ What is very useful his eastern Slovakia map where you can click on a box and
            Message 5 of 11 , Jun 17, 2009
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              Mike,
              Here is the link to Juraj Cisarik's website: http://www.cisarik.com/
              What is very useful his eastern Slovakia map where you can click on a "box" and then within that box click on the villages. Then a list of the surnames is listed and also all the names the village has gone by. For Litmanova click on the box in the upper left with the word Stara in it.

              Here is the website for Litmanova: http://www.litmanova.sk/ Most towns in Slovakia now have a website eventually they all will. The sight is only in Slovak. In the upper right there is a link to send an e-mail. English is the second language in school now. So it is worth writing them and hope you get a response. If the e-mail goes to the City Hall you can request they look in their records for Mary.


              From: Mike Repak
              Sent: Wednesday, June 17, 2009 7:56 PM
              To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: RE: [S-R] Re: Genealogy research --Repak/Kovalesjcsik





              Thanks for your response. On Charles' Petition for US Naturalization he
              lists his birthplace as Yamberia Austria, but on his WW1 Draft Registration
              card it's written as something that looks like "Bukmir" Austria-Hungary. I
              took a quick look at these but will have to revisit now that I realize how
              important this will be for this research. Dad & I were baptized into the
              Byzantine Rite of the Catholic Church which was loyal to the Pope but had
              many traditions in common with the Orthodox church. Of course, I can't be
              sure if that was Charles' religion as well, but the death certificate
              indicates that he was buried at Calvary Cemetary in Queens which was largely
              Catholic at that time at least.

              I had found a very interesting website on Litmanova. Here's the address, in
              case any other member needs it: http://nbenyo.ipower.com/

              Thanks for the info on the 1869 census. I noticed that the group page in
              Yahoo has some info that may help me penetrate the language barrier in using
              the records.

              Please excuse my newbie ignorance, but what is Cisarik & how can this be
              accessed?

              Mike Repak

              _____

              From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com] On
              Behalf Of johnqadam
              Sent: Wednesday, June 17, 2009 10:33 PM
              To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [S-R] Re: Genealogy research --Repak/Kovalesjcsik

              When searching for genealogical information, knowing the birth village is
              paramount because records are organized by village not nationally, so it is
              not possible to search on a national basis. It is also necessary to know the
              religion.

              >>> His name was Charles M. REPAK and we believe that he was born in
              Austria-Hungary around 1889. . . . arrived in NYC in 1895. <<<

              Not found on Ellis island but Cisarik has references to three Slovak Repak
              priests. The key to success is determining the Repak birth village.

              >>> Mary Marcsisak . . . arrived in NYC on July 11, 1905 and was single when
              she arrived. She came from Litmanova <<<

              LDS has available the GC church records from Litmanova and also the very
              useful 1869 Hungarian Census. If the Repak family originated in Litmanovce,
              you might find them in the 1869 census, along with Marcsisak.

              It's a start.

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Bill Tarkulich
              Hello Mike, The religion you speak of, contemporary Byzantine Catholic, is a cleaned up politically correct name of what was called Greek Catholic 100
              Message 6 of 11 , Jun 18, 2009
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                Hello Mike,
                The religion you speak of, contemporary Byzantine Catholic, is a "cleaned
                up" "politically correct" name of what was called "Greek Catholic" 100 years
                ago. Ethnic Rusyns (formerly known as Ruthenians) predominated the faith.
                Rusyns (aka Carpatho-Rusyn) live is far eastern Slovakia, western Ukraine
                and (until 1949) Southeastern Poland. These lands are essentially in the
                Carpathian mountains. While people move around, this gives you a clue
                where to start looking. Resources:
                http://www.iabsi.com/gen/public/many_things_rusyn.htm

                Until 1918, Slovakia and West Ukraine (formerly known as Carpatho-Ukraine)
                were a part of Hungary. Poland and the present-day Czech republic were part
                of "Austria". Combined, they were known as Austria-Hungary dual-monarchy
                until the end of WWII. In practice, you probably know the dual monarchy did
                not work too well. Most immigrants identified themselves as either from
                Austria or from Hungary. The few that identified as from "Austria Hungary"
                oftentimes were as confused as we are about what to call themselves. So
                proceed with caution.

                I would be careful looking at www.cisarik.com for priests. Priests often
                were relocated to their parishes from great distances. However, the
                priest's lineage is often articulated therein.

                I might be inclined to use the Slovak Phonebook, or the surname frequency
                reference that Peter Nagy referenced a few days ago (check our group message
                archives.) http://slovnik.juls.savba.sk/ I would be inclined to take the
                village names with high frequency and see what REPAK immigrants cite they
                are from these villages and indicated NYC was their final destination.
                Since Litmanova is near Kosice in the east, I'd be looking at nearby
                villages first, and then spread out your research.

                The Slovakia phone book shows many pages REPAK, scattered throughout
                Slovakia. Use it with caution, since after WWII many people moved around
                for employment opportunities. This is why identifying the village is
                essential. I urge you to search for the village, not the name. You will
                soon learn this is the key to success.

                It's also quite possible that he didn't arrive at port of NY (Ellis Island
                records), but it's often likely his handwritten record was poorly written or
                transcribed. Consider writing to the Bureau of Citizenship and Immigration
                for a copy of his file, which may contain his "first papers", invaluable
                info including date of first arrival, parents name, village, port of arrival
                and so on. Reference http://www.iabsi.com/gen/public/eidb_strategies.htm

                Another clue. 100 years ago, the indigenous name "Wasyl" or "Vasyl" was
                often Americanized by the immigrant as "Charles". The reason seems lost to
                time, perhaps it was a custom, tradition, or simply the trendy thing to do.
                So keep this in mind as you read through records.

                Another clue. Look for other relatives in the US as a way to ID the village
                name. You assert he was b.1889 and arrive in 1895. Who brought him? In
                almost every case I know of a child that age arrive with their parents.
                Search for the parents in the immigration files, then see where they came
                from.

                I am also curious why he had a middle initial. Middle names were very
                uncommon.



                Good Luck,


                Bill


                -----Original Message-----
                From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com] On
                Behalf Of Mike Repak
                Sent: Wednesday, June 17, 2009 10:57 PM
                To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: RE: [S-R] Re: Genealogy research --Repak/Kovalesjcsik

                Thanks for your response. On Charles' Petition for US Naturalization he
                lists his birthplace as Yamberia Austria, but on his WW1 Draft Registration
                card it's written as something that looks like "Bukmir" Austria-Hungary. I
                took a quick look at these but will have to revisit now that I realize how
                important this will be for this research. Dad & I were baptized into the
                Byzantine Rite of the Catholic Church which was loyal to the Pope but had
                many traditions in common with the Orthodox church. Of course, I can't be
                sure if that was Charles' religion as well, but the death certificate
                indicates that he was buried at Calvary Cemetary in Queens which was largely
                Catholic at that time at least.



                I had found a very interesting website on Litmanova. Here's the address, in
                case any other member needs it: http://nbenyo.ipower.com/



                Thanks for the info on the 1869 census. I noticed that the group page in
                Yahoo has some info that may help me penetrate the language barrier in using
                the records.



                Please excuse my newbie ignorance, but what is Cisarik & how can this be
                accessed?



                Mike Repak



                _____

                From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com] On
                Behalf Of johnqadam
                Sent: Wednesday, June 17, 2009 10:33 PM
                To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: [S-R] Re: Genealogy research --Repak/Kovalesjcsik








                When searching for genealogical information, knowing the birth village is
                paramount because records are organized by village not nationally, so it is
                not possible to search on a national basis. It is also necessary to know the
                religion.

                >>> His name was Charles M. REPAK and we believe that he was born in
                Austria-Hungary around 1889. . . . arrived in NYC in 1895. <<<

                Not found on Ellis island but Cisarik has references to three Slovak Repak
                priests. The key to success is determining the Repak birth village.

                >>> Mary Marcsisak . . . arrived in NYC on July 11, 1905 and was single when
                she arrived. She came from Litmanova <<<

                LDS has available the GC church records from Litmanova and also the very
                useful 1869 Hungarian Census. If the Repak family originated in Litmanovce,
                you might find them in the 1869 census, along with Marcsisak.

                It's a start.





                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



                ------------------------------------

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              • johnqadam
                ... http://www.cisarik.com/
                Message 7 of 11 , Jun 18, 2009
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                  >>> what is Cisarik & how can this be accessed? <<<

                  http://www.cisarik.com/
                • johnqadam
                  ... These are the former village names previously mentioned in a reply based upon 1995 records for the surname. None seems to be a match. REVÚCA formerly
                  Message 8 of 11 , Jun 18, 2009
                  • 0 Attachment
                    >>> Yamberia Austria, but on his WW1 Draft Registration card it's written as something that looks like "Bukmir" Austria-Hungary. <<<

                    These are the former village names previously mentioned in a reply based upon 1995 records for the surname. None seems to be a match.

                    REVÚCA formerly Nagy-Rõcze, Gömör,
                    MOKRÁ LÚKA formerly Vizesrét, Gömör
                    NIZNÁ MYSLA formerly Alsó-Mislye, Abauj-Torna,
                    VYSNÁ MYSLA formerly Felsõ-Mislye, Abauj- Torna
                    ZÁKOPCIE STRED formerly Zákopcse, Trencsén
                    ZILINA formerly Zsolna, Trencsén
                    HNÚSTA formerly Nyustya (Nyuschtya), Gömör
                    MURÁN formerly Murány, (also called Murányallya), Gömör
                    REVÚCKA formerly Umrla-Lehota, Gömör

                    Bill Tarkulich's web site http://iabsi.com/ has a searchable list of Slovak village names as they appeared in 1828. I researched partial letter combinations and found no match.

                    Perhaps it would be useful to see a scan of the documents that show Yamberia and Bukmir. Given the GC religion, the village may now be in Poland or Ukraine. If so, my research would not likely have found it.
                  • margesonny
                    Can you tell me were I can access this 1995 Slovak census? Thank you Margaret
                    Message 9 of 11 , Jun 19, 2009
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Can you tell me were I can access this 1995 Slovak census?

                      Thank you
                      Margaret



                      -- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "Michael Mojher" <mgmojher@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Mike,
                      > The prime piece of information needed in genealogy is "location", what village did your relatives come from. By knowing where and the religion it is possible to find the records on your family.
                      > I am sending you information on the surnames you listed. What I am pasting in is the results of a hunt through a census done in Slovakia in 1995. They did this extensive census after becoming an independent country in 1993.
                      > There were 155 people with the name Repak in Slovakia and they were located in 46 locations. The top locations are given. The first word is the name of the town (in blue) or a district of a larger town (in black), "obec" is the name of the town. Next is the "okr" or orkes the district or county. The "od. r" gives the name of the district/county before a given date. The "numberX" is the number of people named Repak found in that town.
                      > From this list you can see that a large number of lived in Roznava County (45). It gives you a starting point for your search.
                      > Priezvisko REPÁK sa na Slovensku v roku 1995 nachádzalo 155×, celkový pocet lokalít: 46, najcastejsie výskyty v lokalitách:
                      > REVÚCA, okr. ROZNAVA (od r. 1996 REVÚCA) - 25×;
                      > MOKRÁ LÚKA, okr. ROZNAVA (od r. 1996 REVÚCA) - 10×;
                      > NIZNÁ MYSLA, okr. KOSICE-VIDIEK (od r. 1996 KOSICE - OKOLIE) - 8×;
                      > ZÁKOPCIE STRED (obec ZÁKOPCIE), okr. CADCA - 8×;
                      > ZILINA, okr. ZILINA - 7×;
                      > HNÚSTA, okr. RIMAVSKÁ SOBOTA - 6×;
                      > VYSNÁ MYSLA, okr. KOSICE-VIDIEK (od r. 1996 KOSICE - OKOLIE) - 6×;
                      > MURÁN, okr. ROZNAVA (od r. 1996 REVÚCA) - 5×;
                      > REVÚCKA (obec REVÚCA), okr. ROZNAVA (od r. 1996 REVÚCA) - 5×;
                      > U HOLÝCH (obec ZÁKOPCIE), okr. CADCA - 5×;
                      >
                      > There was no listing for Marcsisak. So it appears that Marcisak is the correct spelling. Here two spellings are given because of dialect marks. I know Litmanova, it is within 15 miles of my paternal ancestral village. Since Litmanova is not on the list, Stara Lubovna and Kamienka are the two closest towns. With only 24 Marcisak listed, it makes it a somewhat rare surname.
                      >
                      > Priezvisko MARCISÁK sa na Slovensku v roku 1995 nachádzalo 2×, celkový pocet lokalít: 1, v lokalitách:
                      > BELÁ NAD CIROCHOU, okr. HUMENNÉ (od r. 1996 SNINA) - 2×;
                      >
                      > --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                      > Priezvisko MARCISÁK sa na Slovensku v roku 1995 nachádzalo 22×, celkový pocet lokalít: 11, v lokalitách:
                      > OLSAVICA, okr. SPISSKÁ NOVÁ VES (od r. 1996 LEVOCA) - 7×;
                      > POPRAD, okr. POPRAD - 3×;
                      > SPISSKÉ PODHRADIE, okr. SPISSKÁ NOVÁ VES (od r. 1996 LEVOCA) - 3×;
                      > GYNOV, okr. KOSICE-VIDIEK (od r. 1996 KOSICE - OKOLIE) - 2×;
                      > SEMSA, okr. KOSICE-VIDIEK (od r. 1996 KOSICE - OKOLIE) - 1×;
                      > KAMIENKA, okr. STARÁ LUBOVNA - 1×;
                      > KEZMAROK, okr. POPRAD (od r. 1996 KEZMAROK) - 1×;
                      > LEVOCA, okr. SPISSKÁ NOVÁ VES (od r. 1996 LEVOCA) - 1×;
                      > STARÁ LUBOVNA, okr. STARÁ LUBOVNA - 1×;
                      > STARÉ MESTO (obec BRATISLAVA), okr. BRATISLAVA - 1×;
                      > NAD JAZEROM (obec KOSICE), okr. KOSICE - 1×;
                      >
                      > There was no listings or alternatives for the surname Kovalesjcsik. And no listing at Ellis Island with that spelling.
                      >
                      > From Ellis Island, no Maria under Marcisak.
                      >
                      > 1 Marcsisak, Maria 13 1881 1894
                      > 2 Marcsisak, Maria Likn...c...ova, Hungary 17 1888 1905
                      >
                      >
                      > From: mrepak
                      > Sent: Wednesday, June 17, 2009 6:30 PM
                      > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                      > Subject: [S-R] Genealogy research --Repak/Kovalesjcsik
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > I'm trying to find out information about my father's father. He died in 1919 when my dad was just an infant, so dad never got to know him. His name was Charles M. Repak and we believe that he was born in Austria-Hungary around 1889. I've been able to obtain his U.S. naturalization certificate which indicates that he arrived in NYC in 1895. I have a wedding picture of he and my grandmother, Mary Marcsisak (sometimes spelled Marcisak) but I don't know the date of marriage. She arrived in NYC on July 11, 1905 and was single when she arrived. She came from Litmanova in what is now the Slovak Republic. I also have obtained Charles' death certificate from NYC Bureau of Records. In handwriting that is not completely legible his parents are identified as Joseph Repak and Tesi Kovalesjcsik. My dad had always told me that Joseph Repak had died when Charles was young (so I can't be certain that he made it to NYC with Charles & Tesi). I also recall my father telling me that Tesi remarried a man with a name that sounded like "Dorax" and had other children. He also said that the family Americanized their name to "Drew." Dad believed that Mr. Dorax may have abandoned his family & moved to Pennsylvania. He recalls that his grandmother, Tesi lived in his neighborhood in lower Manhattan when he was young (in the 1920's & '30's). Charles was naturalized at Camp Upton in Suffolk County, NY, but otherwise I believe his spent his time in the US in Manhattan. I have had no luck in obtaining Tesi's death certificate through searching a couple of databases. I don't have a date of death or location (although I am assuming it would be either Manhattan or Brooklyn). Also, I can't be certain of the spelling of her name as I've seen plenty of misspellings of names in official documents.
                      >
                      > Thanks in advance for any help you can provide me in uncovering any further information about either Charles or Tesi.
                      >
                      > Mike Repak
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >
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