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answers to some naturalization/INS questions

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  • RAHannig00@aol.com
    I have received a couple of questions privately about getting naturalization forms from the INS. I thought others might be interested in the answers. Someone
    Message 1 of 1 , Aug 8, 2000
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      I have received a couple of questions privately about getting naturalization
      forms from the INS. I thought others might be interested in the answers.

      Someone asked about having proof of death for someone who has to obviously be
      dead (their person was born in 1866).
      There is a place on the form where you circle a combination of the following:
      a)i consent to pay any fees (more later on this)
      b)i consent to have my info released to the requestor
      c)i have included proof of death (obit or death cert.)
      You don't circle (b) for what we are doing. This is only if someone is
      asking info on a live person, the subject needs to consent to having the info
      release. So leave this one alone.
      If you have the proof of death, you include it and circle (c). Although
      I have been told I need proof of death (by a fellow researcher), no where on
      the form, including the directions, says the proof is required. I suspect
      there is some sort of cutoff... say for instance if the person was born more
      than 120 years ago you don't need proof. I am going to try to get a firm
      answer from INS on this question. I'll will let you all know if I find
      anything out.

      I've been asked about fees. Although you must circle (a), most requests are
      FREE. They allow 100 copies and 2 hours research time without any cost.
      After that, they accumulate fees, but they only charge you if they accumulate
      $8.00 or more. If it looks like they are going to go over $25.00, they
      contact you to see if you still want to go ahead with it.

      I've been asked if you can make the request without knowing where or when the
      person was naturalized.
      Yes! On the form there is a section where you provide whatever info you can
      about the person. These range from the obvious, like name and birthdate, to
      the obscure, like their alien registration number, petition number, etc. You
      just fill in whatever you know. Of course the more detail you provide the
      better chance they will find the papers. Don't be scared off by the
      statement on the form that if you don't fill out the data fields marked with
      the asterisk they may fail to find the papers. I have sent forms in without
      filling them all out and still got the papers.

      Someone, I think Donna, just mentioned on the list that they requested the
      papers, and even had the naturalization certificate number, and still they
      did not find the papers. This is the first time I've heard of this
      happening. I'm curious about what may have happened. I've only seen success
      when going through the INS. But I'm sure there are some failures.

      Good luck to all in their quest,
      Robin Hannig
      Palmer, PA
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