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Re: [S-R] Germans in Slovakia

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  • treimer@nycap.rr.com
    Max, Remember that people from the Zips also worked in other places. Many Lutheran ministers worked in the Banat, for example, and craftsmen a bit everywhere.
    Message 1 of 6 , Oct 31, 2008
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      Max,

      Remember that people from the Zips also worked in other places. Many Lutheran ministers worked in the Banat, for example, and craftsmen a bit everywhere. My greatgreatgrandfather from Eisdorf (Zakovce now) in 1846 worked from 1845 to 1848 as stonecutter in Elberfeld on the Rhine, and then came back to get married and take over the family farm.

      Good luck,

      Thomas

      ---- f12hte <f12hte@...> wrote:
      > Thanks David,
      >
      > It looks like they came from everywhere! I have been looking in the
      > LDS Family History Library and can't find one group of greats in
      > Spissky Hrusov. I think that it is because these, the Kampciks were
      > relatively new immigrants into Spissky Hrusov. They listed Kortvelyes
      > as the place they were comming from, but for nearest relative, my G
      > Granddad lists his brother in ???something...Germany. If I could just
      > read that, it could open a whole new line of search for his ancestors
      > in that country. I've been using fuzzy gazateer to try to figure out
      > these place names....but they are badly scrawled and probably badly
      > spelled. For some reason, the first part of the place name looks like
      > Bernau to me, even though the initial B is missing.
      >
      > Thanks for the info...you must be a history professor!
      >
      > Max
      >
      >
      > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, david1law@... wrote:
      > >
      > > Hi Max:
      > >
      > > In regard to your question as to where the Germans in the Spis region
      > > (particularly Spissky Hrusov) originally came from is a great
      > question and one that
      > > needs a lot of historical context. The predominant German ethnic
      > group in
      > > the Spis region were the Saxons. I've even seen the name SAKSA
      > (meaning
      > > "Saxon") appear among the name of godparents in my family lineage
      > in the Spis
      > > region. While the Saxons were the main group in the Spis region,
      > there were also
      > > other groups of German/Germanic lineage in the Spis region. There
      > were also
      > > Frankish settlements (Velka Frankova and Mala Frankova), Swedish
      > (Svedlar), and
      > > Swabian (Svabovce, Majere) in the Spis region, and there were also a
      > > Bavarian settlement (Bajerov) in the adjacent Saris region. The
      > first written
      > > mention of most villages in the Spis region (not necessarily those
      > just German in
      > > origin) date back to the 13th and 14th century, though archeaological
      > > evidence shows human habitation back to the Stone Age (such as the
      > discovery in
      > > stone age man in Ganovce). The Hungarian chronicles do reference
      > Thuringia as a
      > > point of origin for German settlers in the Gemer region (adjacent
      > to Spis) as
      > > far back as the 11th century. The Slovak Spectator has an article
      > about the
      > > discovery of the grave of a Germanic chieftain in the Spis region
      > (around
      > > Poprad-Matejovce) dating back to the 5th/6th century:
      > >
      > > _http://www.spectator.sk/articles/view/25074_
      > > (http://www.spectator.sk/articles/view/25074)
      > >
      > > I find the history of the Spis region to be extremely fascinating
      > and it was
      > > definitely multicultural -- and predominately Slavic and German
      > until the
      > > 20th century.
      > >
      > > I hope that this helps a little, though it may prompt even more
      > questions.
      > >
      > > Best regards,
      > >
      > > David
      > > **************Play online games for FREE at Games.com! All of your
      > favorites,
      > > no registration required and great graphics â€" check it out!
      > >
      > (http://pr.atwola.com/promoclk/100000075x1211202682x1200689022/aol?redir=
      > > http://www.games.com?ncid=emlcntusgame00000001)
      > >
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      > ------------------------------------
      >
      > To visit your group on the web, go to:
      > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS/
      >
      > To unsubscribe from this group, go to http://www.yahoogroups.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS -or- send blank email to SLOVAK-ROOTS-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.comYahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
    • f12hte
      THanks THomas! I think that my GGF settled down in Hrusov. Because he lists it as his last place of residence on the Ellis Island records. I have made some
      Message 2 of 6 , Nov 1, 2008
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        THanks THomas!

        I think that my GGF settled down in Hrusov. Because he lists it as
        his last place of residence on the Ellis Island records. I have made
        some interesting discoveries reading these records of my GGF and G
        uncle, who traveled together. THe Great uncle lists ?, Schlesen,
        germany as where his nearest relative is from. Once I determined that
        his nearest relative was in Silesia (Schlesen), I looked at my GGF
        record again and compared all the names in 1900 Silesia against all
        the possible interpretations of the words in GGF nearest relative.
        Low and behold Ratibor (german name for current polish Racibórz) seems
        to be the word! GGS fecord says ?, Ratibor, germany. Now I have to
        look at all the cities in Ratibor county to try n find something that
        matches the city. I got confirmation of this when I read a german
        article detailing the derivation of the Kampczyk name. It appears
        that the lions share of them are in upper Silesia per the polish phone
        book. The remainder are in Germany and are probably ones that were
        caught up in the 1945 deportation of German speakers from Poland.

        THis is fun,

        Max

        --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, <treimer@...> wrote:
        >
        > Max,
        >
        > Remember that people from the Zips also worked in other places. Many
        Lutheran ministers worked in the Banat, for example, and craftsmen a
        bit everywhere. My greatgreatgrandfather from Eisdorf (Zakovce now) in
        1846 worked from 1845 to 1848 as stonecutter in Elberfeld on the
        Rhine, and then came back to get married and take over the family farm.
        >
        > Good luck,
        >
        > Thomas
        >
        > ---- f12hte <f12hte@...> wrote:
        > > Thanks David,
        > >
        > > It looks like they came from everywhere! I have been looking in the
        > > LDS Family History Library and can't find one group of greats in
        > > Spissky Hrusov. I think that it is because these, the Kampciks were
        > > relatively new immigrants into Spissky Hrusov. They listed Kortvelyes
        > > as the place they were comming from, but for nearest relative, my G
        > > Granddad lists his brother in ???something...Germany. If I could just
        > > read that, it could open a whole new line of search for his ancestors
        > > in that country. I've been using fuzzy gazateer to try to figure out
        > > these place names....but they are badly scrawled and probably badly
        > > spelled. For some reason, the first part of the place name looks like
        > > Bernau to me, even though the initial B is missing.
        > >
        > > Thanks for the info...you must be a history professor!
        > >
        > > Max
        > >
        > >
        > > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, david1law@ wrote:
        > > >
        > > > Hi Max:
        > > >
        > > > In regard to your question as to where the Germans in the Spis
        region
        > > > (particularly Spissky Hrusov) originally came from is a great
        > > question and one that
        > > > needs a lot of historical context. The predominant German ethnic
        > > group in
        > > > the Spis region were the Saxons. I've even seen the name SAKSA
        > > (meaning
        > > > "Saxon") appear among the name of godparents in my family lineage
        > > in the Spis
        > > > region. While the Saxons were the main group in the Spis region,
        > > there were also
        > > > other groups of German/Germanic lineage in the Spis region. There
        > > were also
        > > > Frankish settlements (Velka Frankova and Mala Frankova), Swedish
        > > (Svedlar), and
        > > > Swabian (Svabovce, Majere) in the Spis region, and there were
        also a
        > > > Bavarian settlement (Bajerov) in the adjacent Saris region. The
        > > first written
        > > > mention of most villages in the Spis region (not necessarily those
        > > just German in
        > > > origin) date back to the 13th and 14th century, though
        archeaological
        > > > evidence shows human habitation back to the Stone Age (such as the
        > > discovery in
        > > > stone age man in Ganovce). The Hungarian chronicles do reference
        > > Thuringia as a
        > > > point of origin for German settlers in the Gemer region (adjacent
        > > to Spis) as
        > > > far back as the 11th century. The Slovak Spectator has an article
        > > about the
        > > > discovery of the grave of a Germanic chieftain in the Spis region
        > > (around
        > > > Poprad-Matejovce) dating back to the 5th/6th century:
        > > >
        > > > _http://www.spectator.sk/articles/view/25074_
        > > > (http://www.spectator.sk/articles/view/25074)
        > > >
        > > > I find the history of the Spis region to be extremely fascinating
        > > and it was
        > > > definitely multicultural -- and predominately Slavic and German
        > > until the
        > > > 20th century.
        > > >
        > > > I hope that this helps a little, though it may prompt even more
        > > questions.
        > > >
        > > > Best regards,
        > > >
        > > > David
        > > > **************Play online games for FREE at Games.com! All of your
        > > favorites,
        > > > no registration required and great graphics â€" check it out!
        > > >
        > >
        (http://pr.atwola.com/promoclk/100000075x1211202682x1200689022/aol?redir=
        > > > http://www.games.com?ncid=emlcntusgame00000001)
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > ------------------------------------
        > >
        > > To visit your group on the web, go to:
        > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS/
        > >
        > > To unsubscribe from this group, go to
        http://www.yahoogroups.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS -or- send blank email
        to SLOVAK-ROOTS-unsubscribe@...! Groups Links
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
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