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Re: [S-R] Tokay/Tokaji wines

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  • Caye Caswick
      I will have to take a pen and paper to my apple cellar -- when the cousins friend from Kosice came to visit, he brought 4 bottles of Tokaj wines -- have no
    Message 1 of 19 , Oct 6, 2008
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      I will have to take a pen and paper to my apple cellar -- when the cousins' friend from Kosice came to visit, he brought 4 bottles of Tokaj wines -- have no idea what's down there, but something tells me it needs to be locked.
       
      Once I remember to write it down and post it -- I'd appreciate it if one of our Tokaj afficianados can explain what I'm storing.  Thanks!
       
      (Might have to bring a little to Pittsburgh and share, I'm not much of a wine drinker myself.)
       
       
       
      Caye


      --- On Mon, 10/6/08, johnqadam <johnqadam@...> wrote:

      From: johnqadam <johnqadam@...>
      Subject: [S-R] Tokay/Tokaji wines
      To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Monday, October 6, 2008, 8:13 AM






      >>> The Tokaji from Hungary also carry a classification of "punt"
      which relates to the quality and implies the number baskets of grapes
      used to make it. I have the seen the numbers run from 1 to 5, but
      there may b higher classifiactions. The higher the number, the
      better the wine. <<<

      Slight enhancement to the explanantion. The higher the number, the
      SWEETER the wine. Sugar content is not necessarily an indicator of
      quality.

      Tokaji wine is made from native grapes Furmint and Harslevelu as well
      as Muscat. There are some dry whites and late harvest sweet wines and
      also the richer style, botrytized dessert wines carrying the
      words "Aszú" or "Puttonyos" on the label.

      "Aszú" means botrytis, the noble rot that plays a part in
      concentrating the sugars, flavor, and acidity of the
      grapes. "Puttonyos" reveals how sweet and rich the wine is, and tells
      the quantity of sweet must used in making the wine.

      Traditionally, the botrytized grapes are mashed and then added to a
      dry wine made from the previous vintage. How much of the botrytized
      must is added determines the sweetness, traditionally defined by the
      number of puttony added to a 136 liter barrel of must. 3 puttonyos is
      the least sweet, and six the sweetest (3 puttonyos means about 75 kg
      of must were added to 136 liters of wine, while 6 would mean adding
      150 kg of must.)

      The mixture then referments and is allowed to age in humid caves for
      several years.

      Southeastern Slovakia has a few Tokay wineries. I prefer the dry
      variant.


















      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • johnqadam
      ... of a wine drinker myself.)
      Message 2 of 19 , Oct 6, 2008
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        >>> (Might have to bring a little to Pittsburgh and share, I'm not much
        of a wine drinker myself.)<<<

        I was looking for a reason to go to PIT, aside from Helene's party.
        Your Tokay might just do it!

        We spent a couple of hours in a Slovak Tokay cave with the winemaker
        just one year ago.

        BTW, we have about 175 wines in the cellar.
      • Caye Caswick
          too bad those aren t 175 beers, I d make a trip to see YOU.   Caye   ... From: johnqadam Subject: Re: [S-R] Tokay/Tokaji wines To:
        Message 3 of 19 , Oct 6, 2008
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          too bad those aren't 175 beers, I'd make a trip to see YOU.
           

          Caye
           


          --- On Mon, 10/6/08, johnqadam <johnqadam@...> wrote:

          From: johnqadam <johnqadam@...>
          Subject: Re: [S-R] Tokay/Tokaji wines
          To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Monday, October 6, 2008, 9:23 AM






          >>> (Might have to bring a little to Pittsburgh and share, I'm not much
          of a wine drinker myself.)<<<

          I was looking for a reason to go to PIT, aside from Helene's party.
          Your Tokay might just do it!

          We spent a couple of hours in a Slovak Tokay cave with the winemaker
          just one year ago.

          BTW, we have about 175 wines in the cellar.


















          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Michael Mojher
          I am very fortunate that I have a cousin who is the Dekan of the Roman Catholic Cathedral in Trebisov. He oversees churches in 125 surrounding villages. In the
          Message 4 of 19 , Oct 6, 2008
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            I am very fortunate that I have a cousin who is the Dekan of the Roman Catholic Cathedral in Trebisov. He oversees churches in 125 surrounding villages. In the five years he has been in Trebisov he has gotten to know all of the winemakers in the Slovakia Tokaj wine region. My great pleasure is when he invites me to go pay a visit to one. It is a special occasion when you get to sit with the winemaker and have a private tasting.
            Slovak Spectator's travel issues each year seem to have some article on Tokaj wines (Hungary spells it Tokaji). Here are links to a few.
            From Slovak Spectator, Visit to a Tokaj Winery - http://travel.spectator.sk/articles/292/ , A Tale of Two Tokaj Wineries - http://travel.spectator.sk/articles/1067/a_tale_of_two_tokaj_wineries,
            How Tokaj Is Made - http://travel.spectator.sk/articles/1066/how_tokaj_is_made, Slovak Grape Varieties - http://travel.spectator.sk/articles/1061/slovak_grape_varieties, How to Read a Slovak Wine Label - http://travel.spectator.sk/articles/1063/how_to_read_a_slovak_wine_label
            Michael Mojher

            From: Caye Caswick
            Sent: Monday, October 06, 2008 7:30 AM
            To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [S-R] Tokay/Tokaji wines



            too bad those aren't 175 beers, I'd make a trip to see YOU.


            Caye


            --- On Mon, 10/6/08, johnqadam <johnqadam@...> wrote:

            From: johnqadam <johnqadam@...>
            Subject: Re: [S-R] Tokay/Tokaji wines
            To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Monday, October 6, 2008, 9:23 AM

            >>> (Might have to bring a little to Pittsburgh and share, I'm not much
            of a wine drinker myself.)<<<

            I was looking for a reason to go to PIT, aside from Helene's party.
            Your Tokay might just do it!

            We spent a couple of hours in a Slovak Tokay cave with the winemaker
            just one year ago.

            BTW, we have about 175 wines in the cellar.

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • PAULA BYRD
            Caye, I m with you, I d take a beer any day befroe the wine. Paula To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.comFrom: ccaswick@yahoo.comDate: Mon, 6 Oct 2008 07:30:45
            Message 5 of 19 , Oct 6, 2008
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              Caye,

              I'm with you, I'd take a beer any day befroe the wine.

              Paula



              To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.comFrom: ccaswick@...: Mon, 6 Oct 2008 07:30:45 -0700Subject: Re: [S-R] Tokay/Tokaji wines




              too bad those aren't 175 beers, I'd make a trip to see YOU. Caye --- On Mon, 10/6/08, johnqadam <johnqadam@...> wrote:From: johnqadam <johnqadam@...>Subject: Re: [S-R] Tokay/Tokaji winesTo: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.comDate: Monday, October 6, 2008, 9:23 AM>>> (Might have to bring a little to Pittsburgh and share, I'm not much of a wine drinker myself.)<<<I was looking for a reason to go to PIT, aside from Helene's party. Your Tokay might just do it!We spent a couple of hours in a Slovak Tokay cave with the winemaker just one year ago.BTW, we have about 175 wines in the cellar.[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Dr. Joe Q
              I believe that the putna has to do with the amount of older Tokay that is put in with the newly fermenting grapes. So the more barrels, the sweeter the wine
              Message 6 of 19 , Oct 6, 2008
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                I believe that the putna has to do with the amount of older Tokay that is put in with the newly fermenting grapes. So the more barrels, the sweeter the wine and the more it costs because it uses already produced wine.

                The bottle I have, it is to be opened in a few weeks on the 95 birthday of my father!

                Dr. "Q

                --- On Sun, 10/5/08, Janet Kozlay <kozlay@...> wrote:

                > From: Janet Kozlay <kozlay@...>
                > Subject: RE: [S-R] Hungarian/Slovak Party - Tokaji Aszu
                > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                > Date: Sunday, October 5, 2008, 7:15 PM
                > The Tokaji aszú wine actually only goes from 3 to 6
                > “putt” (puttonyos =
                > barrels), the higher the number being the sweeter. However,
                > when you can
                > find it in the U.S. it is nearly all 5. The last time I
                > checked, even the 5
                > putt was $80.00 here. The 6 putt and the Eszencia, which is
                > even sweeter,
                > are extremely difficult to find here . . . maybe in New
                > York.
                >
                >
                >
                > This wine has been famous for centuries. King Louis XIV
                > called it “the king
                > of wines and the wine of kings.” Its distinctive flavor
                > is caused by a
                > fungus that attacks the ripened grapes. It is so expensive
                > because of the
                > way it is produced—the vines are permitted to grow only a
                > small number of
                > grape clusters and the grapes are harvested one grape at a
                > time.
                >
                >
                >
                > Dr. Joe, I hope you open that bottle at a very important
                > and festive
                > occasion. Eszencia has been described as “liquid gold.”
                >
                >
                >
                > Janet
                >
                >
                >
                > _____
                >
                > From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                > [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com] On
                > Behalf Of Dr. Joe Q
                > Sent: Sunday, October 05, 2008 5:28 PM
                > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                > Subject: Re: [S-R] Hungarian/Slovak Party
                >
                >
                >
                > Tokaj is also made in a very small area of Slovakia, most
                > of it comes from
                > Hungary. It is expensive relative to other wines. It comes
                > in small bottles
                > of about 500 mL. I have a 1993 Tokaji Aszueszecia that I
                > bought in Budapest
                > in 2001 for about 25,000 forint, at that time the exchange
                > was about 300 HUF
                > / USD so that was around $80!
                >
                > The Tokaji from Hungary also carry a classification of
                > "punt" which relates
                > to the quality and implies the number baskets of grapes
                > used to make it. I
                > have the seen the numbers run from 1 to 5, but there may b
                > higher
                > classifications. The higher the number, the better the
                > wine.
                >
                > Tokaj is sweet like sauternes and is intended to be drunk
                > in small glasses
                > like those used for sherry or port.
                >
                > Dr. "Q"
              • Michael Mojher
                Dr. Joe Q, Here are some paragraphs from the making of Tokaj wine from the Slovak Spectator article. When the right amount of noble rot pierces a grape s
                Message 7 of 19 , Oct 6, 2008
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                  Dr. Joe Q,
                  Here are some paragraphs from the making of Tokaj wine from the Slovak Spectator article.
                  "When the right amount of noble rot pierces a grape's skin, the rot saps the grape's moisture without rotting its juices.

                  The shriveled grape that results (cibebas in Slovak, Aszú in Hungarian) has an immense concentration of flavor. It's the key ingredient in Tokaj. But conditions are not always right for cibebas, which is why Tokaj wine is not produced every year. Even when conditions are right, noble rot strikes only certain grape bunches - in some cases only certain grapes. That means cibebas must be handpicked, which drives up prices.

                  When noble rot has done its job, the cibebas are crushed and added to freshly fermented wine made from undamaged (or unimproved) grapes. The mixture macerates for 24 to 48 hours, and is pressed, filtered, and placed into wood barrels stored in cellars for aging.

                  The cellars are Tokaj's final oddity. Dug into the side of hills starting in the 17th century (supposedly to hide aging wine from marauding Turks), they are ripe grounds for another kind of fungus. A thick black mold that grows on the walls seeps into the barrels and contributes to the wild and wonderful taste of Tokaj.
                  Note: Tokaj wine bottles are numbered from three to six. The ratings indicate the number of barrels of cibebas added to wine made from regular grapes. The higher the rating, the sweeter, smoother and more expensive the wine."



                  From: Dr. Joe Q
                  Sent: Monday, October 06, 2008 7:50 PM
                  To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: RE: [S-R] Hungarian/Slovak Party - Tokaji Aszu


                  I believe that the putna has to do with the amount of older Tokay that is put in with the newly fermenting grapes. So the more barrels, the sweeter the wine and the more it costs because it uses already produced wine.

                  The bottle I have, it is to be opened in a few weeks on the 95 birthday of my father!

                  Dr. "Q

                  --- On Sun, 10/5/08, Janet Kozlay <kozlay@...> wrote:

                  > From: Janet Kozlay <kozlay@...>
                  > Subject: RE: [S-R] Hungarian/Slovak Party - Tokaji Aszu
                  > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                  > Date: Sunday, October 5, 2008, 7:15 PM
                  > The Tokaji aszú wine actually only goes from 3 to 6
                  > “putt” (puttonyos =
                  > barrels), the higher the number being the sweeter. However,
                  > when you can
                  > find it in the U.S. it is nearly all 5. The last time I
                  > checked, even the 5
                  > putt was $80.00 here. The 6 putt and the Eszencia, which is
                  > even sweeter,
                  > are extremely difficult to find here . . . maybe in New
                  > York.
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > This wine has been famous for centuries. King Louis XIV
                  > called it “the king
                  > of wines and the wine of kings.” Its distinctive flavor
                  > is caused by a
                  > fungus that attacks the ripened grapes. It is so expensive
                  > because of the
                  > way it is produced—the vines are permitted to grow only a
                  > small number of
                  > grape clusters and the grapes are harvested one grape at a
                  > time.
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Dr. Joe, I hope you open that bottle at a very important
                  > and festive
                  > occasion. Eszencia has been described as “liquid gold.”
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Janet
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > _____
                  >
                  > From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                  > [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com] On
                  > Behalf Of Dr. Joe Q
                  > Sent: Sunday, October 05, 2008 5:28 PM
                  > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                  > Subject: Re: [S-R] Hungarian/Slovak Party
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Tokaj is also made in a very small area of Slovakia, most
                  > of it comes from
                  > Hungary. It is expensive relative to other wines. It comes
                  > in small bottles
                  > of about 500 mL. I have a 1993 Tokaji Aszueszecia that I
                  > bought in Budapest
                  > in 2001 for about 25,000 forint, at that time the exchange
                  > was about 300 HUF
                  > / USD so that was around $80!
                  >
                  > The Tokaji from Hungary also carry a classification of
                  > "punt" which relates
                  > to the quality and implies the number baskets of grapes
                  > used to make it. I
                  > have the seen the numbers run from 1 to 5, but there may b
                  > higher
                  > classifications. The higher the number, the better the
                  > wine.
                  >
                  > Tokaj is sweet like sauternes and is intended to be drunk
                  > in small glasses
                  > like those used for sherry or port.
                  >
                  > Dr. "Q"





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