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Re: [S-R] 1995 Slovak Census

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  • Joe Armata
    Hi Barbara! Here s what you have: Hanchak is an English spelling, ch pronounced as usual in English. Hancsak is a Hungarian spelling, cs pronounced like
    Message 1 of 48 , Sep 20, 2008
      Hi Barbara! Here's what you have:

      Hanchak is an English spelling, "ch" pronounced as usual in English.
      Hancsak is a Hungarian spelling, "cs" pronounced like English "ch".
      So these two are pronounced the same.

      Hangyak is a Hungarian spelling, "gy" pronounced like English "j" in "jump".
      Handzak is a Slovak spelling, "dz" (with a mark over the "z") is like
      English "j".
      So these two are pronounced the same.

      So there are two spellings pronounced Hanchak, and two pronounced Hanjak
      (as we'd spell it in English, with j as in jump). The priests spelled
      as they heard back then, so one priest heard the name one way, and the
      other priest the other way.

      Joe




      > My great grandfather went by Hanchak in the US, although his brother
      > decided to go by Hancsak.
      > The birth certificate written by the priest, in Kralovce, has the
      > name spelled Hangyak.
      > In Kecerovce, the name is Handzak. Now, I ask you, does the "gy" and
      > the "dz" sound the same? It just doesn't seem right to me.
      > But, I have my gr.grandfather's birth, and his brother's birth (who
      > was baptized in Kecerovce)and those are the two different spellings
      > by the two different priests.
      > I also worked my gr.grandfather's father back to Gonc, with the
      > spelling of Handza.
      > It certainly is interesting watching the spelling of the name change
      > over the years, and the different spelling in the different
      > registries. Remember, this man was a shepherd, so I found him in
      > numerous registries. Also found an entire line of Handzak's
      > southeast of Kosice, who do not seem to be related at all.
      > Thanks, in advance, for your help.
      > Barbara
    • Nancy Hayes
      I never realized how similar the flags of the Scandinavian countries are, including Finland. Thanks for the links! Nancy From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
      Message 48 of 48 , Apr 21, 2010
        I never realized how similar the flags of the Scandinavian countries are,
        including Finland. Thanks for the links!



        Nancy







        From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com] On
        Behalf Of Ron
        Sent: Wednesday, April 21, 2010 8:30 PM
        To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [S-R] mailings FINISH CONNECTION





        In grade school it was a surprise to learn Finland is part of Scandinavia,
        but geographically it makes sense if you don't limit yourself to the one
        peninsula, and so often Denmark & Iceland are included.... I found Finland
        is regularly considered Scandinavian in Europe. While working on US
        embassies in the Baltics I spent time in Estonia as well & learned how the
        Estonians kept up with Western news through Finnish television.

        Finnish & Estonian are closely related. Hungarian is distantly related. To
        find more Finno-Urgic speaking peoples you have to go into northern Siberia.


        For an emmigrant perspective on 'Scandinavian' check out
        http://www.scandinavianheritagesociety.org/
        for another view, somewhat contradictory (where can you find an ethnic topic
        without contradictions ?)
        http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Scandinavian_states_with_flags.png

        Just the flags sharing a common theme with varying colors gives a hint of
        the close association. I will leave the rest to politicians and geographers
        for finer divisions. By the way, a Scandinavian geographer determined that
        the middle point of Europe is 25 km due north of Vilnius, Lithuania! So
        Slovakia is quite Central European, not Eastern Euro.

        The Balts (Estonia, Lithuania& Latvia) also group themselves together,
        although Latvia and Lithuania share similar languages & Estonian is again
        quite different. Estonia and Lithuania have strong ties to Scandinavia,
        while Latvia is more removed. Just do not confuse Baltics with Balkans!





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