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Slovakian tradition???

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  • ARIKAIAVE@aol.com
    Hi, I am hoping that someone can help me. I have just learned of some traditions that my g-grandmother had, eg. reading tea leaves/coffee grinds & this kind of
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 26, 2000
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      Hi,

      I am hoping that someone can help me.
      I have just learned of some traditions that my g-grandmother had, eg. reading
      tea leaves/coffee grinds & this kind of little saying that she did on a
      person's palm. The words (I don't know the spelling) sound like krejem,
      rajem, paltsem, lohshem-as she was saying the words, she would cross the palm
      & kiss it, as well as the elbow.

      Has anyone ever heard of this? Do the words even resemble the Slovakian
      language?

      She was from Novot, Slovakia (on the Poland border)/She never really
      mentioned specifically what her ethnic background was-I guess everybody just
      assumed she was Slovakian.

      Thanks for your help--
      Sandy
    • John
      ... Let me qualify this response by stating this is just my own limited experience speaking. I believe this was not very common. Most Polish and Slovaks were
      Message 2 of 2 , Jul 26, 2000
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        At 12:56 PM 7/26/00 -0400, you wrote:
        >Hi,
        >
        >I am hoping that someone can help me.
        >I have just learned of some traditions that my g-grandmother had, eg. reading
        >tea leaves/coffee grinds & this kind of little saying that she did on a
        >person's palm. The words (I don't know the spelling) sound like krejem,
        >rajem, paltsem, lohshem-as she was saying the words, she would cross the palm
        >& kiss it, as well as the elbow.

        Let me qualify this response by stating this is just my own limited
        experience speaking. I believe this was not very common. Most Polish and
        Slovaks were Greek or Roman Catholic and, to the best of my knowledge,
        fortune telling was frowned upon if not sinful.

        >Has anyone ever heard of this? Do the words even resemble the Slovakian
        >language?

        paltsem could be fingers, krejem could be to cover or hide, raj is paradise
        and radost is joy both of which might be part of an incantation. On the
        other hand, I may be clutching at straws.

        > She was from Novot, Slovakia (on the Poland border)/She never really
        >mentioned specifically what her ethnic background was-I guess everybody just
        >assumed she was Slovakian.

        Do you know what religion she practiced?

        Janko
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