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Germans in Tot-Prona

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  • treimer@nycap.rr.com
    Hi Liz, Going further back in time, Tot-prona (Windisch-Proben) did have a number of German families (Giger, Greger, Diret,Dieret, Hog, Kuncz, possibly Pallis)
    Message 1 of 1 , Jul 7, 2008
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      Hi Liz,

      Going further back in time, Tot-prona (Windisch-Proben) did have a number of German families (Giger, Greger, Diret,Dieret, Hog, Kuncz, possibly Pallis) who obviously merged with the Slovak majority in the village at some point.

      Here is from the 1715 census of household heads paying taxes

      http://www.arcanum.hu/mol/lpext.dll/1715/1238/1244

      Adózók neve: Georgius Simonides; Mathias Csilla; Georgius Polericzky; Mathias Rucska; Martinus Pallis; Simon Pallis; Joannes Timko; Joannes Giger; Joannes Baczka; Joannes Pizacsics; Georgius Vőrős; Joannes Gréger; Michael Oravecz; Georgius Piesovszky; Georgius Tomany; Michael Diret; Paulus Dieret; Georgius Sloboda; Georgius Vaga; Joannes Tomusany; Jacobus Kuncz; Joannes Kuczka; Samuel Bogdala; Georgius Studinczka; Georgius Hog; Mathias Oravecz; Andreas Pallis; Georgius Paulini; Joannes Retlich; Georgius Pallis; Georgius Telzan; Michael Gregoir; Andreas Hotirpal; Andreas Kuizinsky; Georgius Tichy

      Have fun searching,

      Thomas

      ---- Janet Kozlay <kozlay@...> wrote:
      > Dear Liz,
      >
      >
      >
      > First of all, I congratulate you on having put together a great deal of
      > information about your forebears, and for putting it all out there. This
      > will be of great help to anyone who wishes to help you.
      >
      >
      >
      > I have begun looking at your lines and find that your Kuka ancestors, and
      > various of their relatives, can be found in the Ellis Island records as
      > coming from Totprona (Tót-Próna or Tóth-Próna), which is the Hungarian name
      > of Slovenske Pravno. As you noted, most of them were destined for Chicago.
      > You can find these entries yourself by using Steve Morse’s site for Ellis
      > Island research (www.stevemorse.org <http://www.stevemorse.org/> ), either
      > the Gold or White form, and searching for immigrants from Totprona. You will
      > find the most entries by using “Last Name starts with” (you can use only the
      > first letter of the last name, such as K) and Town Name of Totprona. There
      > you will, for instance, find five Kukas:
      >
      >
      >
      > Georg Kuka (your Juraj), immigrating April 20, 1907, to his brother-in-law
      > Josef Simonides in Chicago.
      >
      >
      >
      > Jozsef Kuka, immigrating 1906.
      >
      >
      >
      > Paula Kuka, immigrating 1914 to Chicago. Father, Samuel Kuka in Totprona.
      >
      >
      >
      > Emilia Kuka (probably your Amelia), immigrating 1907 to brother-in-law Juraj
      > Gyurkovic in Chicago. Her mother was Zuzanna Kuka in Totprona. (Gyurkovic is
      > undoubtedly the same as Durkovic.)
      >
      >
      >
      > Anna Kuka immigrating 1911 to her brother-in-law Josef Simonides in Chicago.
      > Her father was Samuel Kuka in Totprona. She was traveling with Jan Lichner
      > from Totprona whose destination was his brother-in-law Josef Klein.
      >
      >
      >
      > There is no need to be surprised to find the name Klein. Yes, it is a German
      > name, but you will find many with early German ancestry in that area, many
      > if not most who eventually identified with the Slovak language and culture
      > while retaining their old family name.
      >
      >
      >
      > At the time of your ancestors’ immigration, Totprona was in Turóc county.
      > That region is now called by the Slovak name Turiec. (The “c” is pronounced
      > like “ts.”) You can see an old map from the time of your ancestors at
      > http://lazarus.elte.hu/hun/maps/1910/turoc.jpg. The villages have their
      > Hungarian names on that map. Totprona is just above the first “u” in
      > Stubnyafurdo, the blue section.
      >
      > You will be able to find immigration records for others who are related by
      > using different letters for Last Name. If you use “S,” for example, you will
      > find a few named Simonides (variously spelled) from Totprona. By noting
      > information about relatives left behind and those who were the immigrant’s
      > destination, you can begin to work out a real family tree. You may find some
      > you were not aware of, such as Paula Kuka. (She actually may be more
      > accurately Pavla.) You will also find your “Suzanna Direr” under the
      > spelling Zsuzsanna Derer.
      >
      > However, the best source for working out the family tree will be the church
      > records. John Q. Adam has provided some information for you on these LDS
      > microfilms. If you are not familiar with finding and using these films, I
      > will be happy to give you more detailed guidelines and suggestions. (I think
      > you can probably confine yourself to Slovenske Pravno, unless you have
      > definite information that some came from Martin, which was quite a distance
      > away.)
      >
      > I will also look at some of your other names to see what I can find.
      >
      > Janet
      >

      > _____
      >
      > From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com] On
      > Behalf Of Elizabeth Tjomsland
      > Sent: Sunday, July 06, 2008 1:24 PM
      > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: [Norton AntiSpam] [S-R] This newcomer is happy to meet you all
      >
      >
      >
      > Hello, my name is Liz. I joined this group recently, because I thought I
      > might get some pointers on my genealogy research. I’m a novice who has been
      > working from bits and pieces of information found in the paperwork of my
      > parents after they passed on. All the folks from previous generations are
      > gone, so there is no one left to ask. The following is what I do know at
      > this point.
      >
      > My paternal grandfather, Juraj Kuka (1885-1961), came from Slovenske
      > Pravno,Martin Turciansky Svaety. He was very certain that there was no
      > change in the surname spelling.
      > Parents: Juraj Kuka(1843-1905) and Suzanna Fontana(1859-1941).
      > Siblings: Jan, Jozef (m. Irena Kollar), Amelia (m. Paul Podmajersky),
      > Suzanna (m. George Durkovic, I think).
      > My grandfather married Suzanna Klein(1889-1934). Even though the name sounds
      > Germanic, she insisted that she was Slovak. Her parents were Jozef
      > Klein(1869-1934)and Suzanna Direr (1864-1942) and they supposedly had a farm
      > in Slovakia which was eventually confiscated by the Communists.
      >
      > My maternal grandmother, Alzbeta Zvonar,(1892-1935) came from Brezova.
      > Parents: Martin Zvonar and Katarina Mizialko (1862-1929)
      > Siblings: Matej (1887-1887), Stefan (1888 - ?), Judita (1896-1902) and
      > Martin (1905 - ?).
      > My grandmother married Louis (Alois) Svec in Chicago. I know next to nothing
      > about him. He supposedly ran away from home at the age of 17, came to the
      > U.S. and had little contact with his family. His parents were Jozef Svec and
      > Mary Rovnanski.
      >
      > My maternal great grandmother was Katarina Mizialko from Brezova.
      > Parents: Stefan Mizialko(b.1820-?) and Alzbeta Chvascula(b. 1822-?).
      > Siblings: Stefan (1847-?), Matej, Jan, and Suzanna 1856-?)(m Samuel Nosko)
      > She married Martin Zvonar in 1886, who apparently came to the U.S. on
      > several occasions to work the coal mines in Pennsylvania. She immigrated to
      > the U.S. after her husband died.
      >
      > Everyone that immigrated settled in Chicago or surrounding area and, with
      > the exception of Louis Svec and his parents, were Lutheran (Trinity Slovak
      > Lutheran Church).
      >
      > My dad’s name was George Julius, however, on the back of a photograph, I see
      > that his mother wrote his name as “Durko”. Is this indicative of something?
      > Also wrote the middle name of my uncle as “Ludwig” (Louis). Is this just a
      > dialect issue or ???? All the other “Georges” in his family were Juraj.
      >
      > I will welcome any and all comments.....anything that might help me untangle
      > my roots.
      >
      > Many Thanks.....Regards, Liz
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
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