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Re: [S-R] Death/Reproduction

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  • Ben Sorensen
    Hey Micheal, can you send that again? I can t seem to get that link to work, and I wanna read it too... :-D Ben Michael Mojher wrote:
    Message 1 of 6 , Jun 2, 2008
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      Hey Micheal,
      can you send that again? I can't seem to get that link to work, and I wanna read it too... :-D
      Ben

      Michael Mojher <mgmojher@...> wrote:
      Diane,
      The link below is to the article description. It is somewhat academic, but from it you see what has influenced birth and death rates over the past two hundred years.
      www.marathon.uwc.edu/geography/Demotrans/demtran.htm
      THE DEMOGRAPHIC TRANSITION
      Keith Montgomery
      Department of Geography and Geology

      The "Demographic Transition" is a model that describes population change over time. It is based on an interpretation begun in 1929 by the American demographer Warren Thompson, of the observed changes, or transitions, in birth and death rates in industrialized societies over the past two hundred years or so.

      From: Diana Boggs
      Sent: Monday, June 02, 2008 12:56 PM
      To: slovak-roots@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [S-R] Death/Reproduction

      Why would cities have a higher death rate than reproduction rate? Doesn't that defeat the purpose of having a "society"? dlb

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      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Ron Matviyak
      Diane, I always looked upon city sanitation - really lack of sanitation by today s standards - as the primary cause of city deaths historically exceeding birth
      Message 2 of 6 , Jun 2, 2008
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        Diane,

        I always looked upon city sanitation - really lack of sanitation by
        today's standards - as the primary cause of city deaths historically
        exceeding birth and survival rates. This would predate the
        industrialization Ben refers to, and carry over through his era as
        well. I must disagree with Ben on the reason for the lack of children
        in cities. Reproductive control was (virtually) always forbidden by
        governments and churches, and the knowledge of reproductive methods
        and controls were hard to come by. Consider how many parents really
        have an honest discussion with their children in today's 'enlightened'
        age, and multiply that by ignorance, morality and illegality.

        So I put close quarters and poor sanitation at the root of cities
        having higher mortality rates through the ages.

        Ron
        my original comment was in message
        20217 Re: Adam Theorum & The Railroads, Et Cetera

        --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, Diana Boggs <ssmudsville@...> wrote:
        >
        > Why would cities have a higher death rate than reproduction rate?
        Doesn't that defeat the purpose of having a "society"? dlb
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • Ben Sorensen
        Actually, Ron you are also correct, however, the lack of children was that there was no NEED for them at the rate as they were on farms, and not that anyone
        Message 3 of 6 , Jun 2, 2008
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          Actually,
          Ron you are also correct, however, the lack of children was that there was no NEED for them at the rate as they were on farms, and not that anyone ever moderated the birth rate in cities. This did influence the size of the family in the mid to late 1800's, but it was NEVER sanctioned by any nation (until modern China).
          It was a social need, not a mandate, and that is a general overview of the situation. there were exceptions in rural and urban societies.
          We must also look at the ready availibility of "health care" in cities, which, paradoxically, was a DISADVANTAGE in the cities- very often, one was NOT better off seeing a doctor, though this wasn't common knowledge. The fact that the rural dwellers did not go to the doctor also helped this survival/death rate. :-P
          However, Ron, I fully agree with you on the sanitation. streets doubled as sewers in most cities. Yuck....
          Ben :-)


          Ron Matviyak <rmat@...> wrote:
          Diane,

          I always looked upon city sanitation - really lack of sanitation by
          today's standards - as the primary cause of city deaths historically
          exceeding birth and survival rates. This would predate the
          industrialization Ben refers to, and carry over through his era as
          well. I must disagree with Ben on the reason for the lack of children
          in cities. Reproductive control was (virtually) always forbidden by
          governments and churches, and the knowledge of reproductive methods
          and controls were hard to come by. Consider how many parents really
          have an honest discussion with their children in today's 'enlightened'
          age, and multiply that by ignorance, morality and illegality.

          So I put close quarters and poor sanitation at the root of cities
          having higher mortality rates through the ages.

          Ron
          my original comment was in message
          20217 Re: Adam Theorum & The Railroads, Et Cetera

          --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, Diana Boggs <ssmudsville@...> wrote:
          >
          > Why would cities have a higher death rate than reproduction rate?
          Doesn't that defeat the purpose of having a "society"? dlb
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >







          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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