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Re: [S-R] Surname Spellings

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  • david1law@aol.com
    Hello: If you look in the Slovak alphabet, there is a diagraph CH that comes right after the letter H -- that may help to explain the interchange of the
    Message 1 of 6 , May 7, 2008
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      Hello:

      If you look in the Slovak alphabet, there is a diagraph "CH" that comes
      right after the letter "H" -- that may help to explain the interchange of the "H"
      and "CH". For example, see the following link:

      _http://www.slovakiasite.com/slovak-language.php_
      (http://www.slovakiasite.com/slovak-language.php)

      Best regards,

      David



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    • Alan Antoska
      Don t forget that the scribe would also have changed over that time. Different scribes meant different educational background. ... Get the name you always
      Message 2 of 6 , May 7, 2008
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        Don't forget that the scribe would also have changed over
        that time. Different scribes meant different educational
        background.

        --- Michael Mojher <mgmojher@...> wrote:

        > I was wondering if someone might have an explanation
        > for the variation in surname spellings.
        > I have just finished going through a roll of records
        > for Plavnica and found the following spellings for
        > Mojher:
        > In the 1700's to 1804 the surname appears to be spelt
        > MOLHER.
        > In June, 1804 was clearly MOJHER and in August, 1804
        > MOJCHER. These two spellings were used until 1810.
        > In 1810 MOLCHER began to be used consistently.
        > In 1855 to the present MOJCHER has been used.
        > In Slovakia they pronounce the name MOI-hair.
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >



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      • Michael Mojher
        David, I went back and found when the C began to be used. From the handwriting I could tell that a new person was the recorder. He wrote MOJ and lifted the pen
        Message 3 of 6 , May 8, 2008
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          David,
          I went back and found when the C began to be used. From the handwriting I could tell that a new person was the recorder. He wrote MOJ and lifted the pen off the paper. When he began HER the beginning stroke created a small C. The next time there was an entry the C was larger and proportional the the other letters.
          Since every letter is pronounced in Slovak it is interesting that Mojcher is pronounced with a silent C, MOI-hair not MOI-chair.
          The remaining mystery is how the L that was used for so long was changed into a J. There are a number of years where both letters were used and the same recorder was making the entry.


          From: david1law@...
          Sent: Wednesday, May 07, 2008 12:32 PM
          To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [S-R] Surname Spellings


          Hello:

          If you look in the Slovak alphabet, there is a diagraph "CH" that comes
          right after the letter "H" -- that may help to explain the interchange of the "H"
          and "CH". For example, see the following link:

          _http://www.slovakiasite.com/slovak-language.php_
          (http://www.slovakiasite.com/slovak-language.php)

          Best regards,

          David

          **************Wondering what's for Dinner Tonight? Get new twists on family
          favorites at AOL Food.
          (http://food.aol.com/dinner-tonight?NCID=aolfod00030000000001)

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Michael Mojher
          Alan, It was interesting that the same scribe, obvious by the handwriting, would use both MOLCHER and MOJCHER during the same year and a couple of times the
          Message 4 of 6 , May 8, 2008
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            Alan,
            It was interesting that the same scribe, obvious by the handwriting, would use both MOLCHER and MOJCHER during the same year and a couple of times the same month. I found this in both Latin and Hungarian records.


            From: Alan Antoska
            Sent: Wednesday, May 07, 2008 7:01 PM
            To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [S-R] Surname Spellings


            Don't forget that the scribe would also have changed over
            that time. Different scribes meant different educational
            background.

            --- Michael Mojher <mgmojher@...> wrote:

            > I was wondering if someone might have an explanation
            > for the variation in surname spellings.
            > I have just finished going through a roll of records
            > for Plavnica and found the following spellings for
            > Mojher:
            > In the 1700's to 1804 the surname appears to be spelt
            > MOLHER.
            > In June, 1804 was clearly MOJHER and in August, 1804
            > MOJCHER. These two spellings were used until 1810.
            > In 1810 MOLCHER began to be used consistently.
            > In 1855 to the present MOJCHER has been used.
            > In Slovakia they pronounce the name MOI-hair.
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >

            Get the name you always wanted with the new y7mail email address.
            www.yahoo7.com.au/y7mail





            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • J Michutka
            ... While Slovak may not have silent letters as English does, there is another way to account for the variations between h and ch--my understanding is that
            Message 5 of 6 , May 8, 2008
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              On May 8, 2008, at 11:13 AM, Michael Mojher wrote:
              >
              > Since every letter is pronounced in Slovak it is interesting
              > that Mojcher is pronounced with a silent C, MOI-hair not MOI-chair.
              > The remaining mystery is how the L that was used for so long
              > was changed into a J. There are a number of years where both
              > letters were used and the same recorder was making the entry.
              >

              While Slovak may not have silent letters as English does, there is
              another way to account for the variations between h and ch--my
              understanding is that they represent nearly the same sound in Slovak,
              articulated exactly the same except that one is voiced and one is
              unvoiced, similar to the difference in the English -th- in "think"
              and "this". And like the -th- in English, the Slovak -ch- represents
              one sound.... we'd never say that one of the letters in -th- is
              silent, it represents its own sound, distinct from either of the
              letters (t and h) that are used.

              Julie Michutka
              jmm@...

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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