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Re: [S-R] Name Change

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  • William F Brna
    Of course, if he lived in Massachusetts rather than New Jersey, the answer is obvious. That s the way that a final a is pronounced, e. g., Cuba is
    Message 1 of 10 , Feb 3, 2008
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      Of course, if he lived in Massachusetts rather than New Jersey, the
      answer is obvious. That's the way that a final "a" is pronounced, e. g.,
      Cuba is pronounced Cuber.

      Bill Brna


      On Mon, 04 Feb 2008 00:27:14 -0000 "Dennis and Donna"
      <ddhalusker@...> writes:
      That is interesting. I never heard it explained in such a way.

      I guess then that is that. Unless others can further share a story or

      two.

      - In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, MILAN HUBA <illy@...> wrote:
      >
      > After coming to America, my maternal grandfather changed the
      spelling of this name at least four times. This was done
      informally...he just started signing his name differently. The
      various name changes are reflected on various documents including the
      birth certificates of his children.
      >
      > In his case, he was trying to retain the original European
      pronunciation of his name. If he retained the European spelling, his
      name would have been pronounced or would have sounded differently in
      English. Each time he changed the spelling of his name, he was
      refining the process, trying to get the English spelling even closer
      to the correct European sound.
      >
      > It is perfectly legal to unofficially change your name unless of
      course this is done with the intent to defraud someone else.
      >
      >
      >
      > Dennis and Donna <ddhalusker@...> wrote:
      >
      > I return once again to the Pros here at Slovak-Roots. I am seeking a
      > direction to follow in searching for the origin of Our Family name
      being
      > changed.
      >
      > As I understand it,My Grand Father wishing to have a more American
      > sounding name changed his from "Haluska" to "Halusker".
      >
      > This I have heard through Family History and the fact that all
      documents
      > I have for My Great Grand Father are for Haluska up to and
      including his
      > Death. My Grand Father's BC also has Haluska as a Surname. At some
      > point in time he began using Halusker.
      >
      > This could have been done when he recieved his SS# became Employed
      with
      > the Erie Rail Road or some time before he Married My Grand Mother.
      All
      > list Halusker and not Haluska.
      >
      > What do you guys think? Could he have done this on his own or could
      this
      > be a legal thing through the courts.
      >
      > Charles Halusker Jr. Resided in Garfield NJ at least until 1934
      when he
      > Married in Cliffside Park.
      >
      > How does one begin this search?
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Bill Tarkulich
      Hee! Hee! So True. Be careful when you order a milkshake here: they take it literally... Bill ... From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
      Message 2 of 10 , Feb 3, 2008
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        Hee! Hee! So True.
        Be careful when you order a milkshake here: they take it literally...


        Bill


        -----Original Message-----
        From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com] On
        Behalf Of William F Brna
        Sent: Sunday, February 03, 2008 7:51 PM
        To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [S-R] Name Change

        Of course, if he lived in Massachusetts rather than New Jersey, the
        answer is obvious. That's the way that a final "a" is pronounced, e. g.,
        Cuba is pronounced Cuber.

        Bill Brna


        On Mon, 04 Feb 2008 00:27:14 -0000 "Dennis and Donna"
        <ddhalusker@...> writes:
        That is interesting. I never heard it explained in such a way.

        I guess then that is that. Unless others can further share a story or

        two.

        - In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, MILAN HUBA <illy@...> wrote:
        >
        > After coming to America, my maternal grandfather changed the
        spelling of this name at least four times. This was done
        informally...he just started signing his name differently. The
        various name changes are reflected on various documents including the
        birth certificates of his children.
        >
        > In his case, he was trying to retain the original European
        pronunciation of his name. If he retained the European spelling, his
        name would have been pronounced or would have sounded differently in
        English. Each time he changed the spelling of his name, he was
        refining the process, trying to get the English spelling even closer
        to the correct European sound.
        >
        > It is perfectly legal to unofficially change your name unless of
        course this is done with the intent to defraud someone else.
        >
        >
        >
        > Dennis and Donna <ddhalusker@...> wrote:
        >
        > I return once again to the Pros here at Slovak-Roots. I am seeking a
        > direction to follow in searching for the origin of Our Family name
        being
        > changed.
        >
        > As I understand it,My Grand Father wishing to have a more American
        > sounding name changed his from "Haluska" to "Halusker".
        >
        > This I have heard through Family History and the fact that all
        documents
        > I have for My Great Grand Father are for Haluska up to and
        including his
        > Death. My Grand Father's BC also has Haluska as a Surname. At some
        > point in time he began using Halusker.
        >
        > This could have been done when he recieved his SS# became Employed
        with
        > the Erie Rail Road or some time before he Married My Grand Mother.
        All
        > list Halusker and not Haluska.
        >
        > What do you guys think? Could he have done this on his own or could
        this
        > be a legal thing through the courts.
        >
        > Charles Halusker Jr. Resided in Garfield NJ at least until 1934
        when he
        > Married in Cliffside Park.
        >
        > How does one begin this search?
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



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      • Andrea Vangor
        Right you are. My Klinka relatives show up in the Bridgeport newspaper as Clinker . You have the right idear, Bill. ... From: William F Brna To:
        Message 3 of 10 , Feb 3, 2008
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          Right you are. My Klinka relatives show up in the Bridgeport newspaper as "Clinker". You have the right idear, Bill.


          ----- Original Message -----
          From: William F Brna
          To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Sunday, February 03, 2008 4:50 PM
          Subject: Re: [S-R] Name Change


          Of course, if he lived in Massachusetts rather than New Jersey, the
          answer is obvious. That's the way that a final "a" is pronounced, e. g.,
          Cuba is pronounced Cuber.

          Bill Brna

          On Mon, 04 Feb 2008 00:27:14 -0000 "Dennis and Donna"
          <ddhalusker@...> writes:
          That is interesting. I never heard it explained in such a way.

          I guess then that is that. Unless others can further share a story or

          two.

          - In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, MILAN HUBA <illy@...> wrote:
          >
          > After coming to America, my maternal grandfather changed the
          spelling of this name at least four times. This was done
          informally...he just started signing his name differently. The
          various name changes are reflected on various documents including the
          birth certificates of his children.
          >
          > In his case, he was trying to retain the original European
          pronunciation of his name. If he retained the European spelling, his
          name would have been pronounced or would have sounded differently in
          English. Each time he changed the spelling of his name, he was
          refining the process, trying to get the English spelling even closer
          to the correct European sound.
          >
          > It is perfectly legal to unofficially change your name unless of
          course this is done with the intent to defraud someone else.
          >
          >
          >
          > Dennis and Donna <ddhalusker@...> wrote:
          >
          > I return once again to the Pros here at Slovak-Roots. I am seeking a
          > direction to follow in searching for the origin of Our Family name
          being
          > changed.
          >
          > As I understand it,My Grand Father wishing to have a more American
          > sounding name changed his from "Haluska" to "Halusker".
          >
          > This I have heard through Family History and the fact that all
          documents
          > I have for My Great Grand Father are for Haluska up to and
          including his
          > Death. My Grand Father's BC also has Haluska as a Surname. At some
          > point in time he began using Halusker.
          >
          > This could have been done when he recieved his SS# became Employed
          with
          > the Erie Rail Road or some time before he Married My Grand Mother.
          All
          > list Halusker and not Haluska.
          >
          > What do you guys think? Could he have done this on his own or could
          this
          > be a legal thing through the courts.
          >
          > Charles Halusker Jr. Resided in Garfield NJ at least until 1934
          when he
          > Married in Cliffside Park.
          >
          > How does one begin this search?
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Dennis and Donna
          http://www.nj.gov/state/darm/links/databases.html This is a link that was sent me from another board. It is
          Message 4 of 10 , Feb 12, 2008
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            http://www.nj.gov/state/darm/links/databases.html
            <http://www.nj.gov/state/darm/links/databases.html>

            This is a link that was sent me from another board. It is a searchable
            Data Base from The State of New Jersey.

            Unfortunatly it did not help me much. I will pass it on anyway . I guess
            my situation is as posted.

            Thanks guys! Dennis





            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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