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Re: [S-R] yoy,oi, yiddish, east slovak...?

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  • david1law@aol.com
    Hi Karen: The village of NIZNA SLANA is in the GEMER region of SLOVAKIA. The nearest large town is ROZNAVA, and if you follow the valley as it winds north,
    Message 1 of 12 , Nov 10, 2007
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      Hi Karen:

      The village of NIZNA SLANA is in the GEMER region of SLOVAKIA. The nearest
      large town is ROZNAVA, and if you follow the valley as it winds north, you
      will the village of NIZNA SLANA past BETLIAR CASTLE and before GOCOVO. Because
      NIZNA SLANA has several diacritical marks, it may sometimes not come up in
      some search queries, in which case, type the name of the village of HENCKOVCE
      which is adjacent to NIZNA SLANA. By the way, GEMERI literally means "FROM
      GEMER" in Hungairan.

      My HRONEC clan is from ROZNAVA and the villages north of ROZNAVA (such as
      NADABULA, CUCMA), and other HRONEC's are farther north of NIZNA SLANA in
      GOCOVO, so if you come across that name, which is very likely in this valley,
      please definitely contact me. Below are a list of the surnames in my direct
      lineage. There are also several other researchers in the GEMER area that I am
      aware of, and they are either participants in this forum and/or on the DELPHI
      FORUM (which can be accessed through Bill Tarkulich's Eastern Slovakia
      Genealogical Research Strategies website at www.iabsi.com ). I will keep an eye out
      for the GEMERI surname. What other surnames are you researching?

      Please feel free to contact me directly at _David1Law@..._
      (mailto:David1Law@...)


      Best regards,


      David


      Researching: BALOG (BALOG, BALOGH), BELAK, CUJ (CSUJ) HAMRAK, HARBALY,
      HARENCAR, HRONEC, HVIZDOS, JURASKO, KAFFAN, KISSEL, KOVALCIK, KREDATUS, ONDERCIN,
      RUSBACKY, TKACS, TOMASOV (and variant spellings thereof) in SARIS County
      (villages of VITAZ, OVCIE, DOLINA, and SIROKE), in SPIS (villages of SPISSKE
      VLACHY, KLUKNAVA, RICHNAVA, KALAVA, VITAZ, OVCIE, DOMANOVCE, SPISSKE HRHOV, STARY
      SMOKOVEC (MLYNICA), and in GEMER County (village of ROZNAVA, BRZOTIN, and
      surrounding area)



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    • jump4toys@aol.com
      The expression is all over the Eastern European community of Jews. Oy Vey, oy yoy yoy... I still say it! My family is from the Carpathian Mountains area near
      Message 2 of 12 , Nov 11, 2007
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        The expression is all over the Eastern European community of Jews. Oy Vey,
        oy yoy yoy...
        I still say it!
        My family is from the Carpathian Mountains area near Munkacs...Svalyava.
        which is now the Ukraine I guess, western ukraine, but used to be Hungary and
        Czechoslovakia.

        DAniel Wachtenheim


        > Heard it many times, from my mother grandmother, and great aunt. The family
        > is originally from eastern Slovkia near Kosice.
        >
        > Dennis and Donna <<A HREF="mailto:ddhalusker%40alltel.net">ddhalusker@...</A>> wrote:
        > You know it is a small world when you come across something like this!
        >
        > How many times as a boy I would get a response like this from my Mother?
        >
        > OY! YO-O-Y Y-O-OY! It must be a regional thing because my roots are in
        > Patakos
        >
        > in Bereg as well. Just tell me Joann,where have you been lately?
        >
        > Searching for Surnames:Haluska/Bumbak/Petrus/Pilat/Csorej
        >
        > --- In <A HREF="mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com">SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com</A>, joannp1@... wrote:
        > >
        > > My maternal Baba did the same and she was from Packanova in the county
        > of Bereg in, what is now, the Ukraine. My mom did the same and so do I.
        > I've even been using the "OY Vey" (sp), I guess that's my Jewish gene
        > showing up.
        > >
        > > Joann
        > >
        > >
        > > ---- "J." cousinjanie1004@... wrote:
        > > > My maternal Baba was from Ubrez - Eastern Slovakia, about 10 miles
        > from Ukraine border.
        > > >
        > > > She always used the expression in this form:
        > > > oy - yoy - yoy
        > > >
        > > > Depending on the situation, the emphasis would vary.
        > > >
        > > > Sometimes it would sound like:
        > > > OY - yoy - yoy
        > > > Accent on the first 'oy' and muttered under her breath; not said
        > directly to anyone, but
        > > > meant to be heard by who ever was nearby.
        > > >
        > > > Sometimes it would sound like:
        > > > oy - yoy - YOY
        > > > Accent on the last 'oy' and spoken directly to another person as
        > Baba's reaction of
        > > > sympathy, annoyance, disbelief, etc. to what ever that person had
        > just told her.
        > > >
        > > > Sometimes Baba would just abbreviate it to a simple 'oy' to cover
        > almost any situation that
        > > > needed only a slight reaction/reply.
        > > >
        > > > My Mom and all the Aunt's use/used this expression the same way. I
        > also have also picked
        > > > up on use of this phrase all my life, but usuaully only among family
        > & close friends. We all
        > > > also use the abbreviated version, probably more often.
        > > >
        > > > Has anyone else had this experience?
        > > >
        >
        >
        >
        >

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      • Regina Haring
        But my baba pronounced it a little differently from the Jewish Oy Yoy Yoy - best described the way the original poster wrote it y o o y y o o y or
        Message 3 of 12 , Nov 12, 2007
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          But my baba pronounced it a little differently from the Jewish Oy Yoy Yoy - best described the way the original poster wrote it y o o y y o o y or maybe (in English) "you - ee" not "yoy"
          Regina Haring

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: jump4toys@...
          To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Monday, November 12, 2007 1:38 AM
          Subject: Re: [S-R] yoy,oi, yiddish, east slovak...?


          The expression is all over the Eastern European community of Jews. Oy Vey,
          oy yoy yoy...
          I still say it!
          My family is from the Carpathian Mountains area near Munkacs...Svalyava.
          which is now the Ukraine I guess, western ukraine, but used to be Hungary and
          Czechoslovakia.

          DAniel Wachtenheim

          > Heard it many times, from my mother grandmother, and great aunt. The family
          > is originally from eastern Slovkia near Kosice.
          >
          > Dennis and Donna <<A HREF="mailto:ddhalusker%40alltel.net">ddhalusker@...</A>> wrote:
          > You know it is a small world when you come across something like this!
          >
          > How many times as a boy I would get a response like this from my Mother?
          >
          > OY! YO-O-Y Y-O-OY! It must be a regional thing because my roots are in
          > Patakos
          >
          > in Bereg as well. Just tell me Joann,where have you been lately?
          >
          > Searching for Surnames:Haluska/Bumbak/Petrus/Pilat/Csorej
          >
          > --- In <A HREF="mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS%40yahoogroups.com">SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com</A>, joannp1@... wrote:
          > >
          > > My maternal Baba did the same and she was from Packanova in the county
          > of Bereg in, what is now, the Ukraine. My mom did the same and so do I.
          > I've even been using the "OY Vey" (sp), I guess that's my Jewish gene
          > showing up.
          > >
          > > Joann
          > >
          > >
          > > ---- "J." cousinjanie1004@... wrote:
          > > > My maternal Baba was from Ubrez - Eastern Slovakia, about 10 miles
          > from Ukraine border.
          > > >
          > > > She always used the expression in this form:
          > > > oy - yoy - yoy
          > > >
          > > > Depending on the situation, the emphasis would vary.
          > > >
          > > > Sometimes it would sound like:
          > > > OY - yoy - yoy
          > > > Accent on the first 'oy' and muttered under her breath; not said
          > directly to anyone, but
          > > > meant to be heard by who ever was nearby.
          > > >
          > > > Sometimes it would sound like:
          > > > oy - yoy - YOY
          > > > Accent on the last 'oy' and spoken directly to another person as
          > Baba's reaction of
          > > > sympathy, annoyance, disbelief, etc. to what ever that person had
          > just told her.
          > > >
          > > > Sometimes Baba would just abbreviate it to a simple 'oy' to cover
          > almost any situation that
          > > > needed only a slight reaction/reply.
          > > >
          > > > My Mom and all the Aunt's use/used this expression the same way. I
          > also have also picked
          > > > up on use of this phrase all my life, but usuaully only among family
          > & close friends. We all
          > > > also use the abbreviated version, probably more often.
          > > >
          > > > Has anyone else had this experience?
          > > >
          >
          >
          >
          >

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          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






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        • nhasior@aol.com
          In a message dated 11/12/2007 7:32:58 AM Eastern Standard Time, rmharing@att.net writes: But my baba pronounced it a little differently from the Jewish Oy Yoy
          Message 4 of 12 , Nov 12, 2007
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            In a message dated 11/12/2007 7:32:58 AM Eastern Standard Time,
            rmharing@... writes:

            But my baba pronounced it a little differently from the Jewish Oy Yoy Yoy -
            best described the way the original poster wrote it y o o y y o o y or maybe
            (in English) "you - ee" not "yoy"
            Regina Haring



            Hi Regina,
            "Oy Yooy yooy" is how I remember my aunts saying it. The family was from
            the Spis county of Slovakia.
            The Jewish neighbors said something that sounded like Oy Givulch. Wonder
            what that ever meant.
            Noreen



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          • Regina Haring
            Yes, Noreen, I remember hearing *somewhere* oy givulch or something like that. My grandparents were from Spis, Saros and Zemplin - so definitely eastern
            Message 5 of 12 , Nov 12, 2007
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              Yes, Noreen, I remember hearing *somewhere* "oy givulch" or something like that. My grandparents were from Spis, Saros and Zemplin - so definitely eastern Slovakia. The dialect they spoke is called "Spis". I've been told it was different enough from what was spoken in central Slovakia, that the ancestors would have had trouble reading newspapers written in what became "standard" Slovak, that spoken in the central part of the country.
              Regina

              ----- Original Message -----
              From: nhasior@...
              To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Monday, November 12, 2007 8:16 AM
              Subject: Re: [S-R] yoy,oi, yiddish, east slovak...?



              In a message dated 11/12/2007 7:32:58 AM Eastern Standard Time,
              rmharing@... writes:

              But my baba pronounced it a little differently from the Jewish Oy Yoy Yoy -
              best described the way the original poster wrote it y o o y y o o y or maybe
              (in English) "you - ee" not "yoy"
              Regina Haring

              Hi Regina,
              "Oy Yooy yooy" is how I remember my aunts saying it. The family was from
              the Spis county of Slovakia.
              The Jewish neighbors said something that sounded like Oy Givulch. Wonder
              what that ever meant.
              Noreen

              ************************************** See what's new at http://www.aol.com

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






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              No virus found in this incoming message.
              Checked by AVG Free Edition.
              Version: 7.5.503 / Virus Database: 269.15.24/1115 - Release Date: 11/7/2007 9:21 AM


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Armata, Joseph R
              Oy gevald (gevalt) is a Yiddish expression of dismay, meaning literally Oh, violence ( Violence is happening, please come and help me ). I still say
              Message 6 of 12 , Nov 12, 2007
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                "Oy gevald (gevalt)" is a Yiddish expression of dismay, meaning literally "Oh, violence" ("Violence is happening, please come and help me").

                I still say Oy-yoy-yoy, learned from my grandmother from Poland (she came from near Rzeszow).

                Joe


                > -----Original Message-----
                > From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                > [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Regina Haring
                > Sent: Monday, November 12, 2007 9:00 AM
                > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                > Subject: Re: [S-R] yoy,oi, yiddish, east slovak...?
                >
                > Yes, Noreen, I remember hearing *somewhere* "oy givulch" or
                > something like that. My grandparents were from Spis, Saros
                > and Zemplin - so definitely eastern Slovakia. The dialect
                > they spoke is called "Spis". I've been told it was different
                > enough from what was spoken in central Slovakia, that the
                > ancestors would have had trouble reading newspapers written
                > in what became "standard" Slovak, that spoken in the central
                > part of the country.
                > Regina
                >
              • nhasior@aol.com
                Joe, thank you so much for translating the meaning of Oy gevald. I never knew what it meant and after 55 years, now, thanks to you, I finally do. much
                Message 7 of 12 , Nov 12, 2007
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                  Joe, thank you so much for translating the meaning of "Oy gevald." I never
                  knew what it meant and after 55 years, now, thanks to you, I finally do.
                  much appreciated.
                  Noreen

                  "Oy gevald (gevalt)" is a Yiddish expression of dismay, meaning literally
                  "Oh, violence" ("Violence is happening, please come and help me").

                  I still say Oy-yoy-yoy, learned from my grandmother from Poland (she came
                  from near Rzeszow).

                  Joe







                  ************************************** See what's new at http://www.aol.com


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Robert Shive
                  My mother s family was from Also Mislye, near Kosice. The expression I heard was oy-yoy-yoy or what sounded like oy kevolt . If it s Yiddish in origin, I
                  Message 8 of 12 , Nov 26, 2007
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                    My mother's family was from Also Mislye, near Kosice. The expression I heard was "oy-yoy-yoy" or what sounded like "oy kevolt". If it's Yiddish in origin, I guess it goes to show what influences are spread within ethnic groups, sometimes without their even knowing it.

                    "Armata, Joseph R" <armata+@...> wrote:
                    "Oy gevald (gevalt)" is a Yiddish expression of dismay, meaning literally "Oh, violence" ("Violence is happening, please come and help me").

                    I still say Oy-yoy-yoy, learned from my grandmother from Poland (she came from near Rzeszow).

                    Joe

                    > -----Original Message-----
                    > From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                    > [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Regina Haring
                    > Sent: Monday, November 12, 2007 9:00 AM
                    > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                    > Subject: Re: [S-R] yoy,oi, yiddish, east slovak...?
                    >
                    > Yes, Noreen, I remember hearing *somewhere* "oy givulch" or
                    > something like that. My grandparents were from Spis, Saros
                    > and Zemplin - so definitely eastern Slovakia. The dialect
                    > they spoke is called "Spis". I've been told it was different
                    > enough from what was spoken in central Slovakia, that the
                    > ancestors would have had trouble reading newspapers written
                    > in what became "standard" Slovak, that spoken in the central
                    > part of the country.
                    > Regina
                    >





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                  • Edie
                    Hi! I guess it goes to show what influences are spread within ethnic groups, sometimes without their even knowing it. I agree with you! Did you know
                    Message 9 of 12 , Nov 26, 2007
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                      Hi! "I guess it goes to show what influences are spread within ethnic groups, sometimes without their even knowing it." I agree with you! Did you know there's a delicious line of marinades and sauces called Soy Vay? My family really likes them.
                      Edie


                      -----
                      Original Message -----
                      From: Robert Shive
                      To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Monday, November 26, 2007 9:01 AM
                      Subject: RE: [S-R] yoy,oi, yiddish, east slovak...?


                      My mother's family was from Also Mislye, near Kosice. The expression I heard was "oy-yoy-yoy" or what sounded like "oy kevolt". If it's Yiddish in origin, I guess it goes to show what influences are spread within ethnic groups, sometimes without their even knowing it.

                      "Armata, Joseph R" <armata+@...> wrote:
                      "Oy gevald (gevalt)" is a Yiddish expression of dismay, meaning literally "Oh, violence" ("Violence is happening, please come and help me").

                      I still say Oy-yoy-yoy, learned from my grandmother from Poland (she came from near Rzeszow).

                      Joe

                      > -----Original Message-----
                      > From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                      > [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Regina Haring
                      > Sent: Monday, November 12, 2007 9:00 AM
                      > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
                      > Subject: Re: [S-R] yoy,oi, yiddish, east slovak...?
                      >
                      > Yes, Noreen, I remember hearing *somewhere* "oy givulch" or
                      > something like that. My grandparents were from Spis, Saros
                      > and Zemplin - so definitely eastern Slovakia. The dialect
                      > they spoke is called "Spis". I've been told it was different
                      > enough from what was spoken in central Slovakia, that the
                      > ancestors would have had trouble reading newspapers written
                      > in what became "standard" Slovak, that spoken in the central
                      > part of the country.
                      > Regina
                      >

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