Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [S-R] Re: Seeking Advice

Expand Messages
  • david1law@aol.com
    Hi Jenna: I am not sure if this would be classified as sponsorship per se but when my grandfather ANDREW BALOGA (BALOG) immigrated to the United States in
    Message 1 of 6 , Aug 29, 2007
      Hi Jenna:

      I am not sure if this would be classified as sponsorship per se but when my
      grandfather ANDREW BALOGA (BALOG) immigrated to the United States in 1910
      from SPISSKE VLACHY, he came to BEDFORD, OHIO (a suburb or CLEVELAND, OHIO) and
      rented from a JOHN SZALOKY family (possibly related as the elder JOHN SZAOLY
      was sometimes referred to as "Uncle"). My grandmother and my aunt (who was 3
      at the time) subsequently immigrated. Some years later, two of my
      grandfather's brothers JOHN BALOGA and STEFAN BALOGA also immigrated to Cleveland,
      Ohio and stayed with my grandfather (although STEFAN BALOGA originally went to
      ARGENTINA and then to CLEVELAND) as indicated in their Ellis Island records.
      Both ultimately went back to Europe after working in Cleveland, Ohio. My
      grandfather was born in HRISOVCE, which is just over the hill from SIROKE. His
      grandfather JAN BALOGA was born in VITAZ next to SIROKE, and his grandfather
      MATHIAS BALOGA was originally from OVCIE (KIS VITEZ). The surnames in my
      direct lineage include: BALOG, BELAK, CUJ (CSUJ), HAMRAK, HARBALY, HARENCAR,
      HRONEC, HVIZDOS, JURASKO, KISSEL, KOVALCIK, KREDATUS, ONDERCIN, TAKACS (TKACS),
      and TOMASOV. The are a number of other families that I connected to in the
      SPIS/SARIS region, particularly around BRANISKO mountain area adjacent to
      SIROKE, and I have also been in contact with several other researchers in the
      area. I am curious as to the surnames in your lineage as there is a very good
      chance of a connection.

      Best regards,

      David



      ************************************** Get a sneak peek of the all-new AOL at
      http://discover.aol.com/memed/aolcom30tour


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Bill Tarkulich
      100 years ago, it was VERY common for American households to have boarders, unlike today, where people stick to their immediate family. It was done for
      Message 2 of 6 , Aug 29, 2007
        100 years ago, it was VERY common for American households to have
        boarders, unlike today, where people stick to their immediate family. It
        was done for several reasons, including additional income, and to harbor
        other family for a period of time. Almost always it was single men or
        women. Take a look at census documents from the 1890s to 1920, it will
        bear this out.

        Here's an example. My grandparents took in a cousin (an unwed male) who
        happened to be there when my father was born in 1919, and became his
        godfather. He was gone a few years later. My father never knew who the
        fellow was or where he lived. I uncovered this from US census data.

        With regard to "pulling others over", it too was a common phenomena. In
        my villages, 2,3 or 4 men would go to America (presumably to "check it
        out".) They would live in a boarding house initially, working for a few
        years. Then others from the village would come and live nearby: sisters,
        brothers, cousins, wives, children. In my family, the period of 1907 to
        1914 (WWI start) was the largest surge, just like the general immigration
        statistics.
        Once here, they would move a couple times before they "settled down."

        Since it was illegal for employers to recruit overseas, word-of-mouth
        discussion of relative prosperity was common amoung immigrants and their
        families and friends.

        Why Reading? Each town has it's own story. Often it only took one
        immigrant, the first. He (usually a "he") probably got to talking with
        someone who told him about the job opportunities there.

        In my village, there was an initial flood to Scranton, then a couple years
        later, Corning (yes, we found a lot of Slovaks and Rusyns there but for
        only 3 years!), then Binghampton, then Rochester. Each movement took
        fewer and fewer villagers. My villagers seemed to be pretty tight-nit,
        (population 300). As world turmoil took hold in 1914, and subsequent
        immigration restrictions, it's much more difficult to follow immigrants,
        immigration patterns became scrambles.

        Bill



        On Wed, August 29, 2007 9:20 am, jenna-m wrote:
        > I think the question about sponsorship is an interesting one. My
        > grandfather [who came in 1899] came to the U.S.and stayed with a sister
        > and brother in law already living in Reading, PA. The ship's manifest
        > while stating that he came from "Siroke" also noted that he was on his way
        > to Reading and noted the brother in law as a "contact."
        >
        > I know that when he first came he was given "a room" in his sister's
        > house, stayed there to work and then sent for his wife who came two years
        > later. So, there seems to have been a kind of "chain migration"...but it
        > would be interesting to know the particular catalyst for settlement in
        > Reading for many who seemed to have come from the same region in Slovakia.
        >
        > Jenna
        >
        >
      • Jan Ammann
        Hello everyone.... I asked a family member when I was in Hungary if they had an old telephone book I could have. And yes they did...............They gave me
        Message 3 of 6 , Aug 29, 2007
          Hello everyone....

          I asked a family member when I was in Hungary if they had an old telephone book I could have. And yes they did...............They gave me the 2006 edition of the Gyõr-Moson-Sopron megye.

          And it lists all the towns/villages..............even the smallest one in this province/county. I will be glad to do a look-up of any family names you may have that you think may live in this area. When I look at the map in the front part of this telephone book I realize how close Szlovákia is to this megye.

          Of course, I will do it on a "first-come" basis and as I have the time but will be very happy to help anyone out.

          Jan




          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.