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Social Security questions

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  • sabinov@webtv.net
    First, you must remember that the SSDI is a database put out by a private company, NOT the SSAdministration! Many times people don t realize that. Now the SSDI
    Message 1 of 3 , Jun 7, 2000
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      First, you must remember that the SSDI is a database put out by a
      private company, NOT the SSAdministration! Many times people don't
      realize that.

      Now the SSDI is more complete, and updated monthly on the Ancestry and
      Rootsweb sites on the internet. However, when it began to be put
      together by this company, it only listed those who left SSt benefits to
      someone, virtually eliminating all Federal workers, Railroad workers,
      children and widows. Since the boom in genealogy , they are working to
      "fill in the gaps" of those who are not included.
      I've even noticed children included in it now, as now children have to
      have a SS# to be listed as tax deductions. However, there are still
      going to be those left out. Nothing is perfect!

      Also remember that the SS system was started in 1936, so anyone who died
      before then or around then is not going to be in there. The database is
      best for those who died after 1960, but sometimes you will find earlier
      in there. If women -or- men did not have a SS# they will not be in
      there. If you -know- they had a # and are not in there, you can find
      their # via their death certificate and still send for the information.

      As for naturalization, women were not required to be naturalized until
      1922, after the voting rights act. Before that, they were considered
      naturalized if their alien husband became naturalized, or if they
      married a US citizen. (And similarly, if a woman US citizen married an
      alien, she -lost- her citizenship). Until women could vote, there were
      very few benefits to women being citizens. However, some did apply even
      tho it wasn't required, some states required you be a citizen to own
      land or inherit property, and some women just wanted to.

      Shorter versions of this info is on my Hints page.

      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      Maura Petzolt Mobile Alabama USA
      sabinov@...
      Helpful Hints for Successful Searching
      http://www.rootsweb.com/~irlwat/instruct.htm To
      subscribe/unsubscribe/make changes to your membership to the
      SLOVAK-ROOTS mailing list go to
      http://www.egroups.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    • Carole Haas
      I would have to agree that SS information on the internet is now posted for ANYONE who (whom?) ever had a SS# and has died. My mother died first and her SS#
      Message 2 of 3 , Jun 7, 2000
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        I would have to agree that SS information on the internet is now
        posted for ANYONE who (whom?) ever had a SS# and has died. My mother
        died first and her SS# is there and we never collected any benefits.
        Did not collect benefits for my father, because we were not eligible.

        Great for confirming that someone has indeed died.

        What I wonder is, what information do you get if you request "more
        information" have not tried that yet.


        Carole Haas
      • Kathleen Duvall
        ... I got my great-uncles original social security applications, dated 1937. It gave their birthdates, where born, parents names (including mother s maiden
        Message 3 of 3 , Jun 7, 2000
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          > What I wonder is, what information do you get if you request "more
          > information" have not tried that yet. Carole Haas>

          I got my great-uncles original social security applications, dated 1937.
          It gave their birthdates, where born, parents' names (including mother's
          maiden name), where they were born (unfortunately, just the country,
          not the town), current address, employment (both were unemployed,
          but I guess it was the Depression after all). Bits and pieces that helped
          put it all together!

          Kathleen in Florida
          researching GALEK, HUTZMAN
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