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Ottoman Empire Original Question

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  • Michael Mojher
    On the question of what part of Slovakia the Ottoman Empire had control. From the Slovak History: Chronology and Lexicon. Turkish Administration; page 322: -
    Message 1 of 3 , May 11, 2007
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      On the question of what part of Slovakia the Ottoman Empire had control. From the Slovak History: Chronology and Lexicon.
      Turkish Administration; page 322:
      "- from the 1540's to the mid 1680's part of southern and central Slovaks was under Turkish rule. ... they maintained very precise tax registers, deftera. In times of peace the representatives of the Turk's administration did not directly or significantly intervene in local self-administrations or in the religion of the 'unbelievers' (that is , the Christians)."
      Sandjak (or liva); page 297:
      " - a district of the Turkish imperial administration. ... The first sandjak to encroach upon Slovakia was the Esztergom sandjak, which was formed in 1545 - 1546. According to a deftera (tax register) from 1570, more than 420 Slovak communities and villages belonged to it. Among the other sandjaks incorporating some of the territory of Slovakia prior to the so-called Fifteen Years' War (1593 - 1606) were the Novohrad, Secany and especially the Fil'akovo sandjak (1554 - 1593), to which belonged a greater part Gemer, Hont and Hovohrad counties. When the Turks conquered Nove Zamky (1663), they established three other sandjaks within the Nove Zamky ejalet, Nitra, Levice and Novohrad."
      1663; page 69:
      " 12 April - Grand Vizier Koprulu Mehmed, the pasha of Edirne, advanced into Hungary with an army of 120,000 soldiers. After arriving in Buda (15 June), he decided on the conquest of Nove Zamky. On 7 August the advanced guard of the Ottoman army unexpectedly defeated, near Parkan (Sturovo), detachments of the garrison of Nove Zamky led by A. Forgach. On 16 August the grand vizier besieged Nove Zamky, which was defended by 3,500 men."
      " 2 September - The Crimean Tatars, Walachians, Moldavians and a part of the Turks devastated a substantial part of western Slovakia, the middle Povazie region and Moravia."

      It would appear that the Turks did not control any northern or eastern Slovak territory.
      For those who are searching for in the lands the Turks did control it would appear that their deftera, tax registers, could be a good source to look into.
      Michael Mojher

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • fernbrough
      Thanks Mike I ordered the book. Bob S. ... control. From the Slovak History: Chronology and Lexicon. ... central Slovaks was under Turkish rule. ... they
      Message 2 of 3 , May 15, 2007
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        Thanks Mike I ordered the book.

        Bob S.


        --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "Michael Mojher" <mgmojher@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > On the question of what part of Slovakia the Ottoman Empire had
        control. From the Slovak History: Chronology and Lexicon.
        > Turkish Administration; page 322:
        > "- from the 1540's to the mid 1680's part of southern and
        central Slovaks was under Turkish rule. ... they maintained very
        precise tax registers, deftera. In times of peace the
        representatives of the Turk's administration did not directly or
        significantly intervene in local self-administrations or in the
        religion of the 'unbelievers' (that is , the Christians)."
        > Sandjak (or liva); page 297:
        > " - a district of the Turkish imperial administration. ... The
        first sandjak to encroach upon Slovakia was the Esztergom sandjak,
        which was formed in 1545 - 1546. According to a deftera (tax
        register) from 1570, more than 420 Slovak communities and villages
        belonged to it. Among the other sandjaks incorporating some of the
        territory of Slovakia prior to the so-called Fifteen Years' War
        (1593 - 1606) were the Novohrad, Secany and especially the Fil'akovo
        sandjak (1554 - 1593), to which belonged a greater part Gemer, Hont
        and Hovohrad counties. When the Turks conquered Nove Zamky (1663),
        they established three other sandjaks within the Nove Zamky ejalet,
        Nitra, Levice and Novohrad."
        > 1663; page 69:
        > " 12 April - Grand Vizier Koprulu Mehmed, the pasha of Edirne,
        advanced into Hungary with an army of 120,000 soldiers. After
        arriving in Buda (15 June), he decided on the conquest of Nove
        Zamky. On 7 August the advanced guard of the Ottoman army
        unexpectedly defeated, near Parkan (Sturovo), detachments of the
        garrison of Nove Zamky led by A. Forgach. On 16 August the grand
        vizier besieged Nove Zamky, which was defended by 3,500 men."
        > " 2 September - The Crimean Tatars, Walachians, Moldavians and
        a part of the Turks devastated a substantial part of western
        Slovakia, the middle Povazie region and Moravia."
        >
        > It would appear that the Turks did not control any northern or
        eastern Slovak territory.
        > For those who are searching for in the lands the Turks did
        control it would appear that their deftera, tax registers, could be
        a good source to look into.
        > Michael Mojher
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • Jennifer Keith
        Just a thought...I found maps on ebay, for next to nothing, dating from 1912, 1939, 1945, 1956, 1989 and 1991. It s really easy to see where the borders moved
        Message 3 of 3 , May 16, 2007
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          Just a thought...I found maps on ebay, for next to nothing, dating from 1912, 1939, 1945, 1956, 1989 and 1991. It's really easy to see where the borders moved and how that affected our ancestors. The town where my great-grandmother came from started out as Austrian and ran the gammet of ownership. It's a really good visual and I think the most expensive map was $2.25.
          Jennifer


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