Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

About the Canadian Border crossings

Expand Messages
  • Andrea Vangor
    I don t know that many Slovaks took this route, but Ancestry.com has finally, at long last, added the fascinating records of Canadian Border Crossings, a.k.a.
    Message 1 of 1 , Apr 7 5:08 PM
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment
      I don't know that many Slovaks took this route, but Ancestry.com has finally, at long last, added the fascinating records of Canadian Border Crossings, a.k.a. the St. Alban's List. It was a popular and cheap route to the U.S. from English ports, and used a great deal by Russian Jews many of whom fled first to Britain in the 1880's and '90's. My great-grandfather's family came this way. I had found records for some of them a few years ago at the National Archives in Seattle, and now that it is on line I found my mis-filed great-great-grandfather et al. There are actually two sets of records associated with the border crossings: a sort of passenger manifest, and an inspection card. There is fascinating information on those cards, not all of which is duplicated on the manifests. I thought I found the cards on line in a browseable format but can't find my way back to the link. So if anyone finds them please give me a shout. Meanwhile I'm happy to do some spot searches if anyone thinks they have a missing Slovak who came in via the eastern Canadian border/Great Lakes.


      "All creatures are balanced upon the creative word of God,
      as if upon a bridge of diamond;
      above them is the abyss of divine infinitude,
      below them that of their own nothingness."
      - Metropolitan Philaret of Moscow





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.