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Re: [S-R] Re: Example of rude behavior

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  • Nick Holcz
    ... So what was rude about that. Never mind Europeans being more direct I am Australian and I am very direct,I don t reply to anything anonymous. Vladimir is
    Message 1 of 25 , Nov 1, 2006
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      At 01:46 PM 1/11/2006, you wrote:

      >Carl,
      >
      >I found the reply direct and no-nonsense,


      So what was rude about that. Never mind Europeans being more direct I
      am Australian and I am very direct,I don't reply to anything anonymous.

      Vladimir is one of the good guys, he doesn't need defence from me but
      he gets it anyway.

      Nick
    • Dr. Joe Q.
      RUDE a word that is frequently thrown out but little understood. TRITE, SHORT, MISUNDERSTOOD Perhaps, but rude is rarely used in proper context. Generally it
      Message 2 of 25 , Nov 1, 2006
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        RUDE

        a word that is frequently thrown out but little understood.

        TRITE, SHORT, MISUNDERSTOOD

        Perhaps, but rude is rarely used in proper context. Generally it is used
        in an accusatory format as a defensive response to something that was
        not expected.

        Never the less one of the best internet precepts is:

        Do not annoy and do not be easily annoyed.

        Valdimir Bohinc has provided years of advice and information to list
        members (would you believe that this is not the only list he belongs
        to???). He is a professional genealogist, he has the capability to solve
        a mystery that Perry Mason, Columbo, and the Defenders could not handle.
        He is a sincere and dedicated worker, you can trust him to do his best
        and he will probably charge you less than his stated fees.

        He not only likes to know the identity of his clients, it is necessary
        to know this conduct his research.

        He is no more rude or unfamiliar with the habits of “Americans”. The
        Eastern European way of thinking is not materially different than those
        of us in the USA.

        This has become much ado about nothing.

        Dr. “Q

        Carl Kotlarchik wrote:

        >This is an example of what I consider a rude reply. I now recognize
        >that the word is probably "zeliar". But my inquiry was legitimate
        >and did not deserve the rude and patronizing reply that I
        >received. This has got to stop. I am a proud Slovak who will not
        >be treated as a second class person. No one in this group should be
        >afraid to post a question for fear of being insulted by
        >the "professionals".
        >
        >I believe my questions are presented in a dignified and polite
        >manner. I expect the same type of reply and so should everyone else
        >in this group.
        >Carl Kotlarchik
        >
        >--- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "Vladimir Bohinc" <konekta@...>
        >wrote:
        >
        >
        >>Dear Carl,
        >>Please, please. This is not a subject which allows second opinion.
        >>
        >>
        >Waste of time. Zeliar is what I said; a man who only owed a house.
        >
        >
        >>Zelezar ( from zelezo=iron in slovenian or zeljezo in croat) is a
        >>
        >>
        >ironworker, but all this has nothing to do with you.
        >
        >
        >>Vladimir
        >>
        >> ----- Original Message -----
        >> From: Carl Kotlarchik
        >> To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
        >> Sent: Thursday, September 21, 2006 6:36 PM
        >> Subject: Re: [S-R] Unknown occupation
        >>
        >>
        >> Thanks very much for the replies. Someone has also suggested off-
        >> line to me that this word could be "z'eljar" or someone who
        >>
        >>
        >mines
        >
        >
        >> iron ore or is involved with the making of steel. But I don't
        >>
        >>
        >know
        >
        >
        >> what language that would be. Actually, if this is a word for a
        >> miner, then it would make sense in my g-grandfather's case. The
        >> family came from Gomor county which is in the ore mountains. So,
        >> there was mining all around my ancestor's villages. My
        >>
        >>
        >grandmother
        >
        >
        >> also once told me that her father worked in a guarry. So, this
        >>
        >>
        >would
        >
        >
        >> fit. But the on-line dictionaries list "banik" as the word for
        >> miner in Slovak and "ba'nya'sz" in Hungarian. Does anyone else
        >> recognize the word "z'eljar" as possibly "iron ore miner".
        >> Carl
        >>
        >>
        >> --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "Armata, Joseph R.
        >>
        >>
        >(JArmata)"
        >
        >
        >> <JArmata@> wrote:
        >> >
        >> > That's the same as zeliar, or zseller in Hungarian, or
        >>
        >>
        >inquilinus
        >
        >
        >> in
        >> > Latin - someone who owns his house and just a very small plot
        >>
        >>
        >of
        >
        >
        >> land.
        >> > In English sometimes called a cotter.
        >> >
        >> > Joe
        >> >
        >> > -----Original Message-----
        >> > From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
        >> > [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Carl
        >>
        >>
        >Kotlarchik
        >
        >
        >> > Sent: Thursday, September 21, 2006 8:54 AM
        >> > To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
        >> > Subject: [S-R] Unknown occupation
        >> >
        >> >
        >> > I have placed a portion of one of my family church documents
        >>
        >>
        >in
        >
        >
        >> the
        >> > files section of this site. It is labeled as "Unknown
        >> occupation".
        >> > Next to the names of the parents are the occupations of the
        >> > individuals. Most of the names and occupations are written in
        >> Slovak
        >> > but some are in Hungarian. The Slovak word for farm-
        >> hand, "rolnik"
        >> > can be seen. But also the Hungarian word for
        >>
        >>
        >shepherd, "pasztor"
        >
        >
        >> > (misspelled as "pastyr" in this document) can also be seen. I
        >> have
        >> > tried to translate the term used with the two families at the
        >> bottom
        >> > of the page but have not been able to find it. It appears to
        >> > be "zoljar" but I can't find anything like this in either
        >>
        >>
        >Slovak
        >
        >
        >> or
        >> > Hungarian dictionaries. Does anyone recognize this word? The
        >> other
        >> > thing that appears is the abbreviation "ev" which indicates
        >>
        >>
        >that
        >
        >
        >> they
        >> > were members of the Lutheran Church.
        >> > I'd appreciate any suggestions.
        >> > Carl
        >>
        >
        >
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