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Re: [S-R] Girus Danielis

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  • TR HOMEMAIL
    Janet, Thanks for looking at the other mentions in the Census, I was going to do so this week-end. I found a few scattered mentions while aimlessly searching
    Message 1 of 5 , Oct 31, 2006
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      Janet,

      Thanks for looking at the other mentions in the Census, I was going to do so
      this week-end.

      I found a few scattered mentions while aimlessly searching on the internet,
      a jewish Girus Berliner in Plock (Poland) in 1810, and a Dr. Girus Koch who
      was part of the German administration in the Ukraine in 1941. So it is
      clearly a personal name, but a rare one, and probably quite restricted to a
      region. As the isolated mentions among German-Jews (Plock) and Germans (Dr.
      Koch) a long time after my ancestor in 1715 may indicate, the name might
      have been used outside of the Zips later, but again, only rarely, and
      perhaps by people with ancestral ties or some other connection to it.

      I welcome any suggestions about what recognizable name it could be? Or if
      Girus cannot be modernized, then some roots of the name.

      Danke

      Thomas


      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Janet Kozlay" <kozlay@...>
      To: <SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Tuesday, October 31, 2006 4:48 PM
      Subject: RE: [S-R] Girus Danielis


      > There are about a dozen people with the given name of Girus in the 1715
      > Census, including your Girus Danielis. All of them were from Szepes megye.
      > Since these records were in Latin, it is difficult to determine what he
      was
      > actually called, but I find it interesting that the name usually appears
      > among German names. Its use was so localized, it is probably not
      > translatable to any name we would recognize.
      >
      >
      >
      > Janet
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
      > To unsubscribe from this group, go to
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    • david1law@aol.com
      Hi Thomas I m not sure if this will help in the present case of GIRUS, but the following is an excellent website regarding the etymology and history of names,
      Message 2 of 5 , Oct 31, 2006
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        Hi Thomas

        I'm not sure if this will help in the present case of GIRUS, but the
        following is an excellent website regarding the etymology and history of names, and
        contains a large number of name variations according to language. It may be
        worth looking over. The site is actually a lot of fun and contains some
        great facts regarding the origin of the various names.

        _http://www.behindthename.com/_ (http://www.behindthename.com/)


        Best regards,


        David


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • amiak27
        People traveled quite extensively and it is easy enough to have a hot spot of influence come in with a wave of settlers. The Girus name could easily be
        Message 3 of 5 , Oct 31, 2006
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          People traveled quite extensively and it is easy enough to have a
          hot spot of influence come in with a wave of settlers. The Girus
          name could easily be Latinized, or even a Lithuanian derivative.
          The Russians als have quite a long history with similar names that
          could have been modified to local conditions:
          Gira (m) -- var of Giria.
          Giria (m) -- Giria, brother of Ivanets Naumovich. 1552. [Tup 103]
          Dims: Girka (Girka Naumovich, Zhytomyr craftsman). 1552. [Tup 103]
          Vars: Gira (Gira Petrov ziat', Chernobyl' craftsman). 1552. [Tup
          103]
          Hira (Hira Gavrilovich, lord's peasant). 1565. [Tup 104]
          Hyra (Hyra Pronets, Liuboml'sk peasant). 1564. [Tup 103-4]

          More searching and a reading of the local history may well reveal if
          there was an outside influence in selecting the name.

          Ron


          --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "Janet Kozlay" <kozlay@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > There are about a dozen people with the given name of Girus in the
          1715 > Census, including your Girus Danielis. All of them were from
          Szepes megye.
          > Since these records were in Latin, it is difficult to determine
          what he was > actually called, but I find it interesting that the
          name usually appears > among German names. Its use was so localized,
          it is probably not > translatable to any name we would recognize.
          >
          >
          >
          > Janet
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
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