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"Our Slavic Fellow Citizens", by Professor Emily Balch

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  • Bill Tarkulich
    I have recently received a copy of Our Slavic Fellow Citizens , by Professor Emily Balch. This is an absolutely fascinating, authoritative account of our
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 21, 2006
      I have recently received a copy of "Our Slavic Fellow Citizens", by
      Professor Emily Balch. This is an absolutely fascinating, authoritative
      account of our peoples, written during the period of highest emigration to
      America. If, in the course of your research you have every asked the
      question "Why?" Professor Balch has a good handle on the answer.



      If you have more than a passing interest in the how, what, when, where and
      why of emigration from any of the Slavic people - Bohemian/Czech, Slovak,
      Ruthene, Croat, Slovene, Austrian Poles this is a "must read".



      Professor Balch's writings are lucid and insightful. It is a very readable
      tome, while it is historical and anthropological in nature, it reads like a
      novel you don't want to put down. It has helped to "fill in the blanks" for
      me. Written in 1910, it provides a unique perspective that is lost to most
      of us today.



      "Our Slavic Fellow Citizens"

      Emily Green Balch, Associate Professor of Economics, Wellesley College

      Published 1910, Charities Publication Committee, Press of Wm F. Fell Co.,
      Philadelphia

      Reprinted, 1969 Arno Press, Inc. LCC # 69-18758

      536 pages plus many Appendixes, Maps and Charts



      Professor Balch spent the greater part of the year 1905 in Austria-Hungary
      studying emigration on the spot, and over a year in visiting Slavic colonies
      in the United States.

      Professor Balch won the 1946 Nobel Peace Prize. Biography:
      http://nobelprize.org/peace/laureates/1946/balch-bio.html



      This is a seminal study of emigration issues as it relates to Slavic peoples
      both here and abroad. It studies emigration of these peoples from their
      birthplace to America. It is insightful, authoritative and extensively
      researched. The author lived with the people she studied, examined volumes
      of government statistics and probed deeply to understand cause and effect.
      Her solid grounding in historical events is critical to the success of this
      book.



      Contents include

      Slavic Emigration at its Source

      1. The Slavic Nationalities in Europe
      2. Conditions in Austria Hungary
      3. General Character of Slavic Emigration from Austria-Hungary
      4. Bohemian Emigration
      5. Slovak Emigration
      6. Emigration from Galicia; Austrian Poles and Ruthenians
      7. The Slovenians
      8. Emigration from Croatia
      9. The Adriatic Coast of Austria Hungary



      Slavic Immigrants in the Unites States

      1. The History of Slavic Immigration Previous to 1880
      2. The Newer Slavic Immigration: Since 1880
      3. The Present Distribution of Slavs in the United States
      4. The Economic Situation of the Slav in America
      5. Slavs as Farmers
      6. Household Life
      7. The Organized Life of Slavs in America
      8. The Question of Assimilation



      This book is long since out of print. It can be found at large public
      libraries as well as many university libraries. The book is available
      through the used booksellers network, though it is rather expensive.
      Another option is an electronic photocopy. Since the copyrights have
      expired, Dan Kisha took considerable effort to construct digital photos of
      every page of the book. I don't mean to advertise, just note it's
      availability. Dan has made it available for sale on CD or DVD at a price
      far less than the used book copy.





      Bill Tarkulich







      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Gregory J Kopchak
      Bill: I actually have the 1910 first edition. We have parts of the Slovak section on line at http://www.iarelative.com/oldhomes/slavic.htm Greg Kopchak It s
      Message 2 of 3 , Jan 21, 2006
        Bill:

        I actually have the 1910 first edition.

        We have parts of the Slovak section on line at

        http://www.iarelative.com/oldhomes/slavic.htm

        Greg Kopchak
        It's All Relative



        -----Original Message-----
        From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
        [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Bill Tarkulich
        Sent: Saturday, January 21, 2006 8:45 AM
        To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [S-R] "Our Slavic Fellow Citizens", by Professor Emily Balch


        I have recently received a copy of "Our Slavic Fellow Citizens", by
        Professor Emily Balch. This is an absolutely fascinating, authoritative
        account of our peoples, written during the period of highest emigration to
        America. If, in the course of your research you have every asked the
        question "Why?" Professor Balch has a good handle on the answer.



        If you have more than a passing interest in the how, what, when, where and
        why of emigration from any of the Slavic people - Bohemian/Czech, Slovak,
        Ruthene, Croat, Slovene, Austrian Poles this is a "must read".



        Professor Balch's writings are lucid and insightful. It is a very readable
        tome, while it is historical and anthropological in nature, it reads like a
        novel you don't want to put down. It has helped to "fill in the blanks" for
        me. Written in 1910, it provides a unique perspective that is lost to most
        of us today.



        "Our Slavic Fellow Citizens"

        Emily Green Balch, Associate Professor of Economics, Wellesley College

        Published 1910, Charities Publication Committee, Press of Wm F. Fell Co.,
        Philadelphia

        Reprinted, 1969 Arno Press, Inc. LCC # 69-18758

        536 pages plus many Appendixes, Maps and Charts



        Professor Balch spent the greater part of the year 1905 in Austria-Hungary
        studying emigration on the spot, and over a year in visiting Slavic colonies
        in the United States.

        Professor Balch won the 1946 Nobel Peace Prize. Biography:
        http://nobelprize.org/peace/laureates/1946/balch-bio.html



        This is a seminal study of emigration issues as it relates to Slavic peoples
        both here and abroad. It studies emigration of these peoples from their
        birthplace to America. It is insightful, authoritative and extensively
        researched. The author lived with the people she studied, examined volumes
        of government statistics and probed deeply to understand cause and effect.
        Her solid grounding in historical events is critical to the success of this
        book.



        Contents include

        Slavic Emigration at its Source

        1. The Slavic Nationalities in Europe
        2. Conditions in Austria Hungary
        3. General Character of Slavic Emigration from Austria-Hungary
        4. Bohemian Emigration
        5. Slovak Emigration
        6. Emigration from Galicia; Austrian Poles and Ruthenians
        7. The Slovenians
        8. Emigration from Croatia
        9. The Adriatic Coast of Austria Hungary



        Slavic Immigrants in the Unites States

        1. The History of Slavic Immigration Previous to 1880
        2. The Newer Slavic Immigration: Since 1880
        3. The Present Distribution of Slavs in the United States
        4. The Economic Situation of the Slav in America
        5. Slavs as Farmers
        6. Household Life
        7. The Organized Life of Slavs in America
        8. The Question of Assimilation



        This book is long since out of print. It can be found at large public
        libraries as well as many university libraries. The book is available
        through the used booksellers network, though it is rather expensive.
        Another option is an electronic photocopy. Since the copyrights have
        expired, Dan Kisha took considerable effort to construct digital photos of
        every page of the book. I don't mean to advertise, just note it's
        availability. Dan has made it available for sale on CD or DVD at a price
        far less than the used book copy.





        Bill Tarkulich







        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



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      • ajdolli
        Thanks, Bill, for the reference. I borrowed the book on interlibrary loan and have just finished reading it. Fascinating! Anabeth ... Professor Emily Balch.
        Message 3 of 3 , Feb 12, 2006
          Thanks, Bill, for the reference. I borrowed the book on interlibrary
          loan and have just finished reading it. Fascinating!

          Anabeth

          --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "Bill Tarkulich"
          <bill.tarkulich@...> wrote:
          >
          > I have recently received a copy of "Our Slavic Fellow Citizens", by
          Professor Emily Balch. This is an absolutely fascinating,
          authoritative account of our peoples, written during the period of
          highest emigration to America. If, in the course of your research you
          have every asked the question "Why?" Professor Balch has a good
          handle on the answer.

          > If you have more than a passing interest in the how, what, when,
          where and why of emigration from any of the Slavic people -
          Bohemian/Czech, Slovak, Ruthene, Croat, Slovene, Austrian Poles this
          is a "must read".
          >
          > Professor Balch's writings are lucid and insightful. It is a very
          readable tome, while it is historical and anthropological in nature,
          it reads like a novel you don't want to put down. It has helped to
          "fill in the blanks" for me. Written in 1910, it provides a unique
          perspective that is lost to most of us today.
          >
          > "Our Slavic Fellow Citizens"
          > Emily Green Balch, Associate Professor of Economics, Wellesley College
          > Published 1910, Charities Publication Committee, Press of Wm F.
          Fell Co., Philadelphia
          > Reprinted, 1969 Arno Press, Inc. LCC # 69-18758
          >
          > Professor Balch spent the greater part of the year 1905 in
          Austria-Hungary
          > studying emigration on the spot, and over a year in visiting Slavic
          colonies
          > in the United States.
          >
          > Professor Balch won the 1946 Nobel Peace Prize. Biography:
          > http://nobelprize.org/peace/laureates/1946/balch-bio.html


          > Bill Tarkulich
          >
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