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Re: [S-R] Slovak Culture

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  • Andrea Vangor
    You bring up a host of fascinating topics, that have intrigued me too. It might help to separate them and see if we can develop them one at a time,although
    Message 1 of 1 , Jan 2, 2006
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      You bring up a host of fascinating topics, that have intrigued me too. It
      might help to separate them and see if we can develop them one at a
      time,although they are related. One topic is the village hierarchy and the
      meaning of the various terms applied to individuals. Another is the
      question of marriage between different social strata. A third is the
      history of relations between Slovaks and Magyars. A fourth is the history
      of the Roma in Slovakia and their interaction with Slovak society. A fifth
      is the effect of massive emigration and repatriation among Slovaks after
      1880. And so on.





      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Carl Kotlarchik" <kkotlarc@...>
      To: <SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Monday, January 02, 2006 9:08 AM
      Subject: [S-R] Slovak Culture


      > Yes, I have read the Grisak Family History and agree that it is a
      > very good book. I have also ordered several other books that have
      > been recommended but I was hoping that we could discuss things in
      > this forum that you don't necessarily find in the literature. It
      > seems like the more I read, the more questions I have.
      >
      > For example, how common was it for Slovaks and Magyars to marry? I
      > had the impression it was not that common but I am finding it
      > frequently in my family records. This would suggest to me, that
      > over time, the Slovak population would have been assimilated into
      > Hungarian population. But that did not happen. So, was there much
      > tension between the two groups?
      >
      > I asked my earlier question about the status differences between the
      > different terms for farmer because I find most of them used in my
      > family records. Oddly, one clan in my family were only herdsmen,
      > of every kind, for many generations. Then suddenly one marries
      > someone from a family listed as a colonus in one record and jobbagy
      > in another. From what I have read, herdsmen did not participate
      > much in the activities of the village. So, was it unusual for one
      > of them to marry someone who owned property? This individual had
      > been in the army but he is the only member of his family clan that
      > did not become a pasztor. But he also moved away from the town
      > where his wife was raised. So how and why did he change
      > occupations?
      >
      > Anyway, this is what I find interesting about researching the family
      > history. It is not just collecting dates and names. I enjoy trying
      > to understand the time period and the culture. I'm trying to find
      > others with a similar interest so we can share and learn from each
      > other. Most of the questions in this forum pertain to "how do I
      > find something" which is important and I ask these questions too.
      > But I would also like to discuss things that make a story about
      > people's lives. At some point, all of us should write up what we
      > have learned from our family research. This should not be just
      > dates and facts but a personal history of one's family and the
      > influences that shaped their lives.
      >
      >
      > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "johnqadam" <johnqadam@r...>
      > wrote:
      >>
      >> There is an absolutely excellent book about the Rusyn US-immigrant
      >> experience. It's an autobiography of Joseph Grisak, 1873-1950,
      > born
      >> in Slovinky, (today's Slovakia). It goes into great depth
      > describing
      >> day to day living. An absolutely precious glimpse into the past.
      >> It has been recently scanned and is available at
      >>
      >> http://www.saed.kent.edu/~lucak/topica/Grisak.pdf
      >> Be forewarned. It is 352 Kb and 98 pages in length. You will need
      >> Acrobat reader.
      >> Thanks to Larry Krupnak for bringing it to my attention.
      >>
      >> Here is Bill Trakulich's message 3944.1 from the Delphi site.
      >>
      >> There is an absolutely excellent book about the Rusyn US-immigrant
      >> experience. It's an autobiography of Joseph Grisak, 1873-1950,
      > born
      >> in Slovinky, (today's Slovakia). It goes into great depth
      > describing
      >> day to day living. An absolutely precious glimpse into the past.
      >> It has been recently scanned and is available at
      >>
      >> http://www.saed.kent.edu/~lucak/topica/Grisak.pdf
      >> Be forewarned. It is 352 Kb and 98 pages in length. You will need
      >> Acrobat reader.
      >>
      >> >>From the Library of Congress on-line catalog:
      >> >
      >> > Title: The Grisak family
      >> > Authors: Grisak, Michael J. , 1910- (Main Author) *
      >> >LC Control Number: 79103327
      >> > Type of Material: Book (Print, Microform, Electronic, etc.)
      >> > Personal Name: Grisak, Michael J.
      >> > Main Title: The Grisak family / compiled by Michael J. Grisak.
      >> >Published/Created: [Merrillville, Ind.] : Grisak, [1978-1979]
      >> > Description: 2 v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
      >> > Notes: Cover title.
      >> > Subjects: Grisak, Michael J.
      >> > Grisak family.
      >> > Czechoslovakia--Biography.
      >> > United States--Biography.
      >> >LC Classification: CT948.G74 A34
      >> > Dewey Class No.: 943.7/03/0922 B
      >> > Geog. Area Code: e-cs--- n-us---
      >>
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
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