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Re: Village hierarchy

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  • johnqadam
    There is an absolutely excellent book about the Rusyn US-immigrant experience. It s an autobiography of Joseph Grisak, 1873-1950, born in Slovinky, (today s
    Message 1 of 4 , Jan 2, 2006
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      There is an absolutely excellent book about the Rusyn US-immigrant
      experience. It's an autobiography of Joseph Grisak, 1873-1950, born
      in Slovinky, (today's Slovakia). It goes into great depth describing
      day to day living. An absolutely precious glimpse into the past.
      It has been recently scanned and is available at

      http://www.saed.kent.edu/~lucak/topica/Grisak.pdf
      Be forewarned. It is 352 Kb and 98 pages in length. You will need
      Acrobat reader.
      Thanks to Larry Krupnak for bringing it to my attention.

      Here is Bill Trakulich's message 3944.1 from the Delphi site.

      There is an absolutely excellent book about the Rusyn US-immigrant
      experience. It's an autobiography of Joseph Grisak, 1873-1950, born
      in Slovinky, (today's Slovakia). It goes into great depth describing
      day to day living. An absolutely precious glimpse into the past.
      It has been recently scanned and is available at

      http://www.saed.kent.edu/~lucak/topica/Grisak.pdf
      Be forewarned. It is 352 Kb and 98 pages in length. You will need
      Acrobat reader.

      >>From the Library of Congress on-line catalog:
      >
      > Title: The Grisak family
      > Authors: Grisak, Michael J. , 1910- (Main Author) *
      >LC Control Number: 79103327
      > Type of Material: Book (Print, Microform, Electronic, etc.)
      > Personal Name: Grisak, Michael J.
      > Main Title: The Grisak family / compiled by Michael J. Grisak.
      >Published/Created: [Merrillville, Ind.] : Grisak, [1978-1979]
      > Description: 2 v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
      > Notes: Cover title.
      > Subjects: Grisak, Michael J.
      > Grisak family.
      > Czechoslovakia--Biography.
      > United States--Biography.
      >LC Classification: CT948.G74 A34
      > Dewey Class No.: 943.7/03/0922 B
      > Geog. Area Code: e-cs--- n-us---
    • Carl Kotlarchik
      Yes, I have read the Grisak Family History and agree that it is a very good book. I have also ordered several other books that have been recommended but I was
      Message 2 of 4 , Jan 2, 2006
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        Yes, I have read the Grisak Family History and agree that it is a
        very good book. I have also ordered several other books that have
        been recommended but I was hoping that we could discuss things in
        this forum that you don't necessarily find in the literature. It
        seems like the more I read, the more questions I have.

        For example, how common was it for Slovaks and Magyars to marry? I
        had the impression it was not that common but I am finding it
        frequently in my family records. This would suggest to me, that
        over time, the Slovak population would have been assimilated into
        Hungarian population. But that did not happen. So, was there much
        tension between the two groups?

        I asked my earlier question about the status differences between the
        different terms for farmer because I find most of them used in my
        family records. Oddly, one clan in my family were only herdsmen,
        of every kind, for many generations. Then suddenly one marries
        someone from a family listed as a colonus in one record and jobbagy
        in another. From what I have read, herdsmen did not participate
        much in the activities of the village. So, was it unusual for one
        of them to marry someone who owned property? This individual had
        been in the army but he is the only member of his family clan that
        did not become a pasztor. But he also moved away from the town
        where his wife was raised. So how and why did he change
        occupations?

        Anyway, this is what I find interesting about researching the family
        history. It is not just collecting dates and names. I enjoy trying
        to understand the time period and the culture. I'm trying to find
        others with a similar interest so we can share and learn from each
        other. Most of the questions in this forum pertain to "how do I
        find something" which is important and I ask these questions too.
        But I would also like to discuss things that make a story about
        people's lives. At some point, all of us should write up what we
        have learned from our family research. This should not be just
        dates and facts but a personal history of one's family and the
        influences that shaped their lives.


        --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "johnqadam" <johnqadam@r...>
        wrote:
        >
        > There is an absolutely excellent book about the Rusyn US-immigrant
        > experience. It's an autobiography of Joseph Grisak, 1873-1950,
        born
        > in Slovinky, (today's Slovakia). It goes into great depth
        describing
        > day to day living. An absolutely precious glimpse into the past.
        > It has been recently scanned and is available at
        >
        > http://www.saed.kent.edu/~lucak/topica/Grisak.pdf
        > Be forewarned. It is 352 Kb and 98 pages in length. You will need
        > Acrobat reader.
        > Thanks to Larry Krupnak for bringing it to my attention.
        >
        > Here is Bill Trakulich's message 3944.1 from the Delphi site.
        >
        > There is an absolutely excellent book about the Rusyn US-immigrant
        > experience. It's an autobiography of Joseph Grisak, 1873-1950,
        born
        > in Slovinky, (today's Slovakia). It goes into great depth
        describing
        > day to day living. An absolutely precious glimpse into the past.
        > It has been recently scanned and is available at
        >
        > http://www.saed.kent.edu/~lucak/topica/Grisak.pdf
        > Be forewarned. It is 352 Kb and 98 pages in length. You will need
        > Acrobat reader.
        >
        > >>From the Library of Congress on-line catalog:
        > >
        > > Title: The Grisak family
        > > Authors: Grisak, Michael J. , 1910- (Main Author) *
        > >LC Control Number: 79103327
        > > Type of Material: Book (Print, Microform, Electronic, etc.)
        > > Personal Name: Grisak, Michael J.
        > > Main Title: The Grisak family / compiled by Michael J. Grisak.
        > >Published/Created: [Merrillville, Ind.] : Grisak, [1978-1979]
        > > Description: 2 v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
        > > Notes: Cover title.
        > > Subjects: Grisak, Michael J.
        > > Grisak family.
        > > Czechoslovakia--Biography.
        > > United States--Biography.
        > >LC Classification: CT948.G74 A34
        > > Dewey Class No.: 943.7/03/0922 B
        > > Geog. Area Code: e-cs--- n-us---
        >
      • amiak27
        Carl, As you gain information on the meanings of the words, I suggest you associate each meaning with a time and region, as words and meanings do change with
        Message 3 of 4 , Jan 2, 2006
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          Carl,

          As you gain information on the meanings of the words, I suggest you
          associate each meaning with a time and region, as words and meanings
          do change with time and place. Look at our own history within the
          US and you will see that. Part of the time, the Hungarians had a
          very active Diet (legislature) and they were constantly tinkering
          with social experiments. I am skeptical that one word would hold
          one precise meaning over a century or two without hidden changes in
          status of that individual or class of people, and the same word in
          Upper Hungary could have a different variation of the meaning in
          Transylvania at the same time.

          Ron

          --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "Carl Kotlarchik"
          <kkotlarc@r...> wrote:
          >
          > Yes, I have read the Grisak Family History and agree that it is a
          > very good book. I have also ordered several other books that have
          > been recommended but I was hoping that we could discuss things in
          > this forum that you don't necessarily find in the literature. It
          > seems like the more I read, the more questions I have.
          >
          > For example, how common was it for Slovaks and Magyars to marry?
          I
          > had the impression it was not that common but I am finding it
          > frequently in my family records. This would suggest to me, that
          > over time, the Slovak population would have been assimilated into
          > Hungarian population. But that did not happen. So, was there
          much
          > tension between the two groups?
          >
          > I asked my earlier question about the status differences between
          the
          > different terms for farmer because I find most of them used in my
          > family records. Oddly, one clan in my family were only herdsmen,
          > of every kind, for many generations. Then suddenly one marries
          > someone from a family listed as a colonus in one record and
          jobbagy
          > in another. From what I have read, herdsmen did not participate
          > much in the activities of the village. So, was it unusual for one
          > of them to marry someone who owned property? This individual had
          > been in the army but he is the only member of his family clan that
          > did not become a pasztor. But he also moved away from the town
          > where his wife was raised. So how and why did he change
          > occupations?
          >
          > Anyway, this is what I find interesting about researching the
          family
          > history. It is not just collecting dates and names. I enjoy
          trying
          > to understand the time period and the culture. I'm trying to find
          > others with a similar interest so we can share and learn from each
          > other. Most of the questions in this forum pertain to "how do I
          > find something" which is important and I ask these questions too.
          > But I would also like to discuss things that make a story about
          > people's lives. At some point, all of us should write up what we
          > have learned from our family research. This should not be just
          > dates and facts but a personal history of one's family and the
          > influences that shaped their lives.
          >
          >
          > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "johnqadam" <johnqadam@r...>
          > wrote:
          > >
          > > There is an absolutely excellent book about the Rusyn US-
          immigrant
          > > experience. It's an autobiography of Joseph Grisak, 1873-1950,
          > born
          > > in Slovinky, (today's Slovakia). It goes into great depth
          > describing
          > > day to day living. An absolutely precious glimpse into the past.
          > > It has been recently scanned and is available at
          > >
          > > http://www.saed.kent.edu/~lucak/topica/Grisak.pdf
          > > Be forewarned. It is 352 Kb and 98 pages in length. You will
          need
          > > Acrobat reader.
          > > Thanks to Larry Krupnak for bringing it to my attention.
          > >
          > > Here is Bill Trakulich's message 3944.1 from the Delphi site.
          > >
          > > There is an absolutely excellent book about the Rusyn US-
          immigrant
          > > experience. It's an autobiography of Joseph Grisak, 1873-1950,
          > born
          > > in Slovinky, (today's Slovakia). It goes into great depth
          > describing
          > > day to day living. An absolutely precious glimpse into the past.
          > > It has been recently scanned and is available at
          > >
          > > http://www.saed.kent.edu/~lucak/topica/Grisak.pdf
          > > Be forewarned. It is 352 Kb and 98 pages in length. You will
          need
          > > Acrobat reader.
          > >
          > > >>From the Library of Congress on-line catalog:
          > > >
          > > > Title: The Grisak family
          > > > Authors: Grisak, Michael J. , 1910- (Main Author) *
          > > >LC Control Number: 79103327
          > > > Type of Material: Book (Print, Microform, Electronic, etc.)
          > > > Personal Name: Grisak, Michael J.
          > > > Main Title: The Grisak family / compiled by Michael J. Grisak.
          > > >Published/Created: [Merrillville, Ind.] : Grisak, [1978-1979]
          > > > Description: 2 v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
          > > > Notes: Cover title.
          > > > Subjects: Grisak, Michael J.
          > > > Grisak family.
          > > > Czechoslovakia--Biography.
          > > > United States--Biography.
          > > >LC Classification: CT948.G74 A34
          > > > Dewey Class No.: 943.7/03/0922 B
          > > > Geog. Area Code: e-cs--- n-us---
          > >
          >
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