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Re: [SLOVAK-ROOTS]

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  • Andrea Vangor
    Hi, Dan. I would start with the simple and obvious (Lord knows it gets complicated and difficult anyway!). So, what nationality or ethnic group did your
    Message 1 of 1 , Apr 24, 2000
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      Hi, Dan. I would start with the simple and obvious (Lord knows it gets
      complicated and difficult anyway!). So, what nationality or ethnic group
      did your husband's people claim and what language did they speak? If in
      doubt, find the earliest immigrants on the 1920 census or wherever they show
      up, because it will specify the native tongue and the parents' native
      tongues of people who were born overseas.

      In my limited experience (peering at several microfilms of old church
      records) there are all kinds of spelling variations of names, some of which
      occurred during or after the entry into this country but many of which
      occurred during the Hungarian occupation of Slovakia. The Magyar
      orthography was enforced on official documents from about 1840 to 1918, so
      for example Slovak names like Samko are spelled Szamko. I would not jump to
      conclusions about the use of i versus y without other evidence. It's also
      possible that your people were Rusyns, a semi-separate group whose language
      or dialect is more closely related to Ukrainian (it is considered an Eastern
      Slovak tongue). Do you know their religion? Greek Catholic generally means
      a Rusyn or Ruthenian background.

      Smarter people than me can tell you more.


      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Dan Greene <dgreene@...>
      To: <SLOVAK-ROOTS@egroups.com>
      Sent: Sunday, April 23, 2000 6:59 PM
      Subject: [SLOVAK-ROOTS]


      > My husband's grandparents were Martin BURANOVSKI b. 1882 in Sverzov, and
      Catherine KULKA b. 1880 in Tarnov (both,outside of Bardejov) in what is now
      Slovakia. The family now goes by BURANOSKY.
      > We have documents with four different spellings for Martin's last name.
      >
      > I've been told that if the name ends in "i", it is the Polish spelling.
      If it ends in "y", it is the Slovak spelling. I spoke to a man whose last
      name is BURNOSKY (another of our spellings) and he claims the name is
      Ukrainian.
      >
      > I guess what I'd like to know is...does it really make a difference? When
      these people were born the country was Austria-Hungary anyway. I'm confused
      and I think they might be too if they were still alive today. Can anyone
      shed some light on this for me?
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      > Your high school sweetheart-where is he now? With 4.4 million alumni
      > already registered at Classmates.com, there's a good chance you'll
      > find her here. Visit your online high school class reunion at:
      > http://click.egroups.com/1/3139/0/_/545880/_/956541572/
      > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      >
      >
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