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Re: Name endings and surname affixes

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  • Frank
    One of most common Slavic surname affixes is the one denoting gender of the bearer -ová (Slovak), -owa (Polish), and -oba (Russian). As a rule of Slovak
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 24, 2005
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      One of most common Slavic surname affixes is the one denoting gender
      of the bearer -ová (Slovak), -owa (Polish), and -oba (Russian).

      As a rule of Slovak grammar, female surnames end in -á, -ská, or -ová.
      The feminine form of the surnames is considered merely a separate form
      of same surname, not a distinct surname in itself.
      If the surname is adjectival in origin , i.e., ends in -y', the ending
      changes to -á, so that wife of pán (Mr.) C^erny' would be pani (pi)
      (Mrs.) C^erná and their daughter would be slec^na (sl) (Miss) C^erná
      If surname is a noun in form or origin the suffix -ová is added to it,
      e.g., pán Kovác^, pani Kovác^ová, slec^na Kovác^ová.

      The male ending -ov makes the surname into an adjective.
      While -c^ek, -ik, or -cek are diminutive forms of surnames.

      A diminutive is sometimes used as a surname affix to indicate small
      size or state or quality - a clipped form, e.g. kitchen-ette or
      duck-ling.
      Slovak diminutive forms are -ko, -ak, -ek, and -ik used like a y in
      English.
      e.g. kon = horse
      kon + ak meaning little horse i.e., 'pony'.

      Carpartho-Rusyns also used common surname endings such as -cak, -cik,
      -ak, or -ko.

      Frank K
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