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Re: Both Casnowitz and Czernowitz are misspellings

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  • Frank
    When Cyrillic alphabet is transliterated into Roman (Latin) alphabet, 5-7 different spellings are possible - all correct because there is no standard. Depends
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 23, 2005
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      When Cyrillic alphabet is transliterated into Roman (Latin) alphabet,
      5-7 different spellings are possible - all correct because there is no
      standard.
      Depends into which European language the place name or surname was
      transliterated to last ?

      For example, a town located in former Bukovina (which is now divided
      between the Ukraine and Romania) had 7 names in the Latin alphabet.

      1 Chernowatz
      2 Cernauti (Rom)
      3 Chernivtsi (Ukr)
      4 Chernowitz (Ger)
      5 Chernovitsy(Rus)
      6 Chernovits (Yidd)
      7 Tscherenowitz

      So would expect the town listed on the draft registration was actually
      located in Zemplén megye, Hungary rather than above.
      Perhaps little Cabov (formerly called Csabocz, Czabowecz, Czabowez, or
      Czabowecz (H) and located west of Michalovce, Slovakia ?

      Word 'Slavish' was sometimes used in U.S. Census enumerations for 1900
      and 1910.
      If nativity and language were marked 'Slavish' this invariably meant
      Carpatho) Rusyn (Ruthenian) ethnicity and implied G.C. religion
      affiliation.
      Carpatho-Rusyns speak 'po nashemu', their language can be similar to
      Ukrainian and uses the Cyrillic alphabet.
      'Slavish' was a somewhat derogatory term at the time.

      It wasn't until the 1920 that U.S. Census ennumerations reflected
      the political changes that had occurred in Europe after 1918.

      Frank K
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