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Re: "JUG"

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  • Frank Kurchina
    ... behind ... came ... facts. ... I d suggest two possibilities for the surname Gyuk/Jug. My Slovakia census (no locations or data) just a summary of 50,000
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 16, 2000
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      --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@egroups.com, "Mona " <slatter3000@h...> wrote:
      > This is another name I am interested in finding out the origin. As
      > with the name "Gyuk" I posted earlier...it is the same reason
      behind
      > it. "Supposedly" my mothers maiden name was "Gyuk" but when she
      came
      > to Canada she used the name "Jug". I am so curious to get the
      facts.
      > Was it due to a translation problem? I don't know...I'm just
      > grabbing
      > at straws right now. Hoping someone can give me a lead.
      >
      > Thanks again!
      > Mona :)

      I'd suggest two possibilities for the surname Gyuk/Jug.

      My Slovakia census (no locations or data) just a summary of 50,000
      surnames, lists only 50 surname that begin Gy (no Gyuk)

      In Hungarian, the letter gy is pron. d.

      In Canada telephone White Pages , see 5 surname Gyuk are listed.
      Sandor (Alexander) is a Hungarian male first name.

      Feminine first name Lubyca (Ljubica) looks South Slavic (i.e.
      former Yugoslavia)

      In most Slavic languages (Czech, Slovak, Polish, Croatian etc., plus
      Hungarian, the letter j is pron. y.

      Most common example is Jugoslavija = Yugoslavia.

      Are you sure the name is of Slovak ethnicity ?
      Possibly its ethnicity is Slovene ?

      Slovenia was once a part of former Yugoslavia in the Balkans.
      Slovakia was once a part of former Czechoslovakia in Central Europe.

      If you write to Slovenia and don't use Slovenija, the letter
      probably gets mailed to Slovakia.
      If you use Slovensko for Slovakia the letter probably ends up
      in Slovenia ? Our U.S. Postal Service doesn't seem to know
      the difference either.

      How are you ? English

      Hogy Van ? Hungarian (Non-Slavic)

      Ako sa m�s^ ? Slovak

      Jak se m�te ? Czech

      Jak sie pan miewa ? Polish

      Kako ste ? Croatian/Slovene
    • joe@gsphdean.gsph.pitt.edu
      Hi Mona - I believe in Hungarian gy is pronounced like an English j . Joe Armata joe@gsphdean.gsph.pitt.edu
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 16, 2000
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        Hi Mona - I believe in Hungarian "gy" is pronounced like an English "j".

        Joe Armata
        joe@...


        >This is another name I am interested in finding out the origin. As
        >with the name "Gyuk" I posted earlier...it is the same reason behind
        >it. "Supposedly" my mothers maiden name was "Gyuk" but when she came
        >to Canada she used the name "Jug". I am so curious to get the facts.
        >Was it due to a translation problem? I don't know...I'm just
        >grabbing
        >at straws right now. Hoping someone can give me a lead.
        >
        >Thanks again!
        >Mona :)
        >
      • Frank Kurchina
        In Hungarian: The letter j is pron. like y in the English word yes. The letter ly is pron. like y in the English word yes. Traditionally used in some words
        Message 3 of 4 , Apr 17, 2000
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          In Hungarian:

          The letter j is pron. like y in the English word yes.

          The letter ly is pron. like y in the English word yes.
          Traditionally used in some words instead of letter j.

          The letter gy is pron. like di in the English word medium
          (said quickly)
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