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RE: [S-R] Hungarian and Slovak Nobility

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  • Milan Huba
    Janet; Thank you for the information. What you wrote matches some of the information that I have...although it may not be entirely the same. The Ovcharovich
    Message 1 of 51 , Nov 2, 2005
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      Janet;

      Thank you for the information.

      What you wrote matches some of the information that I have...although it may
      not be entirely the same. The Ovcharovich family was of Serbian origin but
      in the service of the Hungarian Kings. Apparently the family got chased out
      of Serbia by the Turks. Demeter was later awarded three counties by King
      Ferdinand I.

      I also heard that the family was referred to as Farcas which is Hungarian
      for wolf. I was given the impression that this was a nickname given to
      Demeter by the Hungarian soldiers that served under him. Demeter's army won
      some battles against the Turks.

      Please send me whatever information that you have these two families
      including the Hungarian text and the Coat of Arms. I have many gaps in my
      information and am looking for any supplement information that I can find.

      My email address is illy@....

      Thank you for your help,

      Milan Huba

      -----Original Message-----
      From: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
      [mailto:SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Janet Kozlay
      Sent: Wednesday, November 02, 2005 12:22 PM
      To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: RE: [S-R] Hungarian and Slovak Nobility


      There is some information--not a lot. The first name is associated with
      Temes megye. The spelling Ovcharovics is listed as an alias of Farkas. There
      is more under the Olcsarovics spelling, all related to Demeter Olcsarovics
      in the 16th century.

      I found the spelling Illia associated only with the Slovak village by that
      name in Hont megye. Illya, however, is listed as a noble name. Siebmacher's
      Wappenbuch illustrates the coat of arms conferred on Stefan Illya de
      Magyargáld in 1649. Magyargáld is also known as Alsógáld, in present-day
      Romania.

      I don't see any further information on these families, unless there are
      alternative spellings I haven't tried. I will send you the Illya coat of
      arms privately. Let me know if you want the Hungarian text on Demeter
      Olcsarovics.

      Janet







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    • James McGrath
      It has her listed as Ilona/Julia, presumably because of the tendency to give the Hungarian form of names. It is unfortunate that this print-off of the parish
      Message 51 of 51 , Jan 16, 2006
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        It has her listed as Ilona/Julia, presumably because
        of the tendency to give the Hungarian form of names.
        It is unfortunate that this print-off of the parish
        register is so difficult to read. The original was bad
        enough, but this print-off is slightly worse.

        James

        --- Vladimir Bohinc <konekta@...> wrote:

        > Dear James,
        > I do not see, where you see Julia. I reat Ilona at
        > best. Her father was Antal Hajder and mother was
        > Terez. The surname of this mother is impossible to
        > identify absolutely correctly, because there are too
        > many possibilities. But, an extisting surname
        > Tomanik in Rajecke Teplice seems to be very close.
        > Janos Hajder was a brick layer. HIs wife was Maria
        > Repassky.
        > Gabor was born in Kosice and Ilona was born in
        > Rajecke Teplice.
        > I also see, you are obsessed with this Germany. You
        > have enough data to look at the church records,
        > finally. There, with marriage records, there you
        > have a chance to see where the Hajder was from .
        > Especially, when he came straight from the Germany,
        > it will be noted there. If not, then he came from
        > another village, which maybe had a significant
        > number of german population and in such case, it is
        > usually known, where did they come from.
        > In general, languages spoken in towns were hungarian
        > and german. Very little slovak, because there were
        > not very many Slovaks in towns.
        > Vladimir
        >
        >
        >


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