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Given Names

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  • Gary Costel
    I came across these 2 given names in Baptismal records, but do not know what they translate into as I have never heard them before. I ve checked several
    Message 1 of 31 , Feb 11, 2005
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      I came across these 2 given names in Baptismal records, but do not know what
      they translate into as I have never heard them before. I've checked several
      websites listing old Hungarian / Slovak / Latin names, but these names do
      not appear in the lists. The 1st one listed is a female, and the second one
      I believe is female, too.


      Parascera
      Glaxa


      Any help would be appreciated.

      Gary Costel

      Researching the following (Slovakia) surnames: Bakajsa, Bereczky, Bockaj,
      Chwerchak, Cossel, Costel, Hacala, Hanchak, Horvath, Jurkiv, Kalman,
      Kascsak, Katrinak, Lahvardi, Murajda, Ondik, Ondike, Petrik, Ribar,
      Stefancin, Yurkiv



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • William C. Wormuth
      Peter, My info has come from my personal experience.  There may be others here who can have factual info but my experiences follow: I was only a visitor but I
      Message 31 of 31 , Sep 23, 2012
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        Peter,

        My info has come from my personal experience.  There may be others here who can have factual info but my experiences follow:

        I was only a visitor but I was told that a Child who was Baptized was sometimes made fun of by his/her teachers.  Children who were confirmed were forbidden to go to University.  Marriage was also looked down on and could result in the loss of a good job and forced to work in the labor force.

        communists/paper communists were required to, (at times, by the party), to observe people attending mass and write the names on a list.  Many people married in the City Hall and before or after went to other cities to marry by a priest. 

        The mother of my live-in MD friend was a teacher.  Her family came from a Hungarian Slovak village in 1948.  They were Roman Catholics.  She, her sister and Brother were educated in Universities, she being a teacher with a "masters degree" and the other
        siblings holding Doctorates.

        None attended church, although she stated her mother did and they were "Believers".  I recently gave her a copy of the JEDNOTA newspaper and when she read it was religious, she threw it away without reading.

        True believers, resisted the communists by Baptizing and Confirming the children.  One family I know had three children, the youngest being the only one who could attend University.

          My cousin told me that the local head of the party came to the priest and ordered him to quiet the singing during mass on Sunday.  The next Sunday the Church overflowed with people and the singing could be heard throughout the village of 4,000 people.

        One priest I knew, Fr. Anton Kebys, often said mass in a nearby village.  One Sunday, he was driving, after saying mass in our town.  He was stopped by a SNB officer who arrested him for driving after drinking alcohol, (during
        celebration of the Holy Mass).  His Automobile was confiscated.  The officer was a resident of our town and knew him well.

        Father once told me that the hardest thing he ever had to do, as a priest was to respond to a persons request to see the priest when he/she was dying, hear confession, forgiving their sins, knowing what the person had done as an active member of the party.

        This man was a saint and persevered all during the communist rule.When communism fell, he was given the rank of Monsignor, teaching in the Bratislava seminary until retirement.  He died, Happy and peaceful in the Pezinok Charitas.

        God Rest his Soul l!

        Z Bohom,

        Vilo







        ________________________________
        From: htcstech <htcstech@...>
        To: SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Sunday, September 23, 2012 3:50 AM
        Subject: Re: [S-R] Given Names


         
        I would be interested to know how Communism affected various faiths. My
        parents were secretly married in Budapest (Midnight in the cryptorium under
        the church), and notification of the marriage was sent to Czechosolvakia to
        an RC church where the priest filled in the 'Observation' column that my
        father married, where and who to on his baptism record.
        When we emigrated to Australia my parents soon abandoned the local RC
        church. Evidently 'community' meant something different to what they were
        both used to.
        The general impression I was given, that Communism did not support any
        religion and that people were free not to attend church. The State was more
        important than Secular.

        Peter M.

        On 23 September 2012 12:21, Ben Sorensen <cerrunos1@...> wrote:

        > **
        >
        >
        > Joe, Babka does both. It is like she tries to "keep it clean," but you
        > better have a good basis in both Spis and Rusyn! You better also expect the
        > grammar to fluctuate- and you have to have a vocabulary in all three. She
        > is going to mix them; but this is normal in Eastern Slovakia.
        >
        > Spis is not just grammar- it is a dialect with different vocabulary as
        > well. Rusyn--and I mean REAL Rusyn, not this sputtering of Spis that is
        > written off a "Rusyn" here in the States, is almost completely different
        > than Slovak.
        >
        > Ben
        >
        > ________________________________
        > From: Joe Armata <armata+@...>
        > To: "SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com" <SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com>
        > Sent: Friday, September 21, 2012 11:55 PM
        >
        > Subject: Re: [S-R] Given Names
        >
        >
        >
        > Ben, I'm curious. When you say your grandmother speaks a mix of Rusyn
        > and Slovak, is she mixing words from the different languages but keeping
        > the grammatical skeleton (conjugation and declension endings) uniform -
        > all from Rusyn or all from Slovak? That's what I'm expecting it must
        > be, but maybe you mean she's actually mixing the grammatical endings,
        > taking some from one language and some from the other. That seems
        > chaotic to me!
        >
        > Joe
        >
        > > Corinne, Babka still speaks a mix of Rusyn, Spis, and Slovak, and
        > > there seems not to be a change that can be easily demarcated by
        > > anything other than education. The traditions are still somewhat
        > > extant, but gradually disappearing. But religion is an interesting
        > > story!
        > >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >

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