Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

DURSZTYN and FALSZTYN

Expand Messages
  • big_ed321
    Happy NEW YEAR EVERYONE I think I found my Grand fathers town it is either DURSZTYN or FALSZTYN The towns circling them are CZORSZTYNSKIE , NIEDZICA, LAPSZE
    Message 1 of 4 , Jan 1, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      Happy NEW YEAR EVERYONE

      I think I found my Grand fathers town it is either DURSZTYN or
      FALSZTYN
      The towns circling them are CZORSZTYNSKIE , NIEDZICA, LAPSZE NIZNE
      TRYBSZ and KREMPACHY
      I found these towns on a 2004 travel road map of POLAND
      I tried to get more detail maps from travel agenties but no luck
      ( mountains ,churches, mines ect)
      My grandfather is JOSEPH HORNICK (HORNIK) landed in USA in 1893
      I have tried to Email some HORNIK people but they do not go thru
      I hope that everyone can help me like they have in the past?
      Thanks ED
    • Frank
      ... ED, Lapse Nizne is located 200 miles south of Warzsawa, Poland. Krempachy is located 197 miles south of Warszawa. Falsztyn is located 5 miles distant from
      Message 2 of 4 , Jan 2, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "big_ed321" <e_hornick@e...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Happy NEW YEAR EVERYONE
        >
        > I think I found my Grand fathers town it is either DURSZTYN or
        > FALSZTYN
        > The towns circling them are CZORSZTYNSKIE , NIEDZICA, LAPSZE NIZNE
        > TRYBSZ and KREMPACHY
        > I found these towns on a 2004 travel road map of POLAND
        > I tried to get more detail maps from travel agenties but no luck
        > ( mountains ,churches, mines ect)
        > My grandfather is JOSEPH HORNICK (HORNIK) landed in USA in 1893
        > I have tried to Email some HORNIK people but they do not go thru
        > I hope that everyone can help me like they have in the past?
        > Thanks ED

        ED,

        Lapse Nizne is located 200 miles south of Warzsawa, Poland.
        Krempachy is located 197 miles south of Warszawa.
        Falsztyn is located 5 miles distant from Krempachy and
        Dursztyn is located 3 miles distant from Krempachy.

        Your towns are located in SE Poland in former Galicia across from the
        Slovakia border and about 11 miles distant from your Matias^ovce (Sk)
        Szepesmátyásfalva (H) as the vrana (crow) flies.


        Hungarian English Polish grammatical form
        kis little mal~a/mal~e/mal~y
        nagy large wielka/wielke/wielki
        felso" upper górna/górne/górny
        alsó lower dolna/dolne/dolny
        felso" upper wyzna,wyzne,wyzny
        alsó lower nizna,nizne,nizny

        Hungarian English Slovak grammatical form
        kis little malá/malé/maly'
        nagy large vel'ká/vel'ké/vel'ky'
        felso" upper horná/horné/horny'
        alsó lower dolná/dolné/dolny'
        felso" upper vys^ná/vys^né/vys^ny'
        alsó lower niz^ná/niz^né/niz^ny'

        >From the late 1700s until the end of WW I, Poland did not exist as a
        country. It was divided among the Russian, German (Prussian), and
        Austrian Empires. These divisions were known as Partitions.
        When Poland was restored as a country after WWI, only certain portions
        of these partitioned areas were used to construct the present day
        Poland.
        The other portion of these areas were retained by the respective
        ruling government. There was German-Poland, Russian-Poland, and
        Austrian-Poland.

        German-Poland
        (20 % territory 23 % population)

        Prussia acquired the western regions of Poland especially
        those, which were later renamed West Prussia (formerly
        Royal Prussia) and the Province of Posen (the area around
        Poznan, called Wielkopolska, i.e. Greater Poland).
        West Prussia was known as Westpreussen (German) and Prusy
        Królewskie (Polish).

        This area was also referred to as Silesia and Prussian-Poland.
        Prussia took parts of Great Poland in the First Partition of Poland in
        1772.
        In the Second Partition in 1793, Prussia seized Danzig (Gdansk), Thorn
        (Torun),
        and Great Poland, as well as a part of Mazovia.
        Prussia took the remainder of Mazovia, including Warsaw, in the
        Third Partition.

        Russian-Poland
        (62 % territory 45 % population)

        Russia had obtained White Russia and Latvian Lithuania to the Dnieper
        and Dvina rivers in the First Partition of Poland.
        In the Second Partition, Russia took most of the western Ukraine,
        including Podolia and a part of Volhynia, and all of the eastern part
        of Lithuania, also obtaining the right to move its troops into what
        remained of Poland and control its foreign policy.
        Russia acquired the rest of Lithuania and the Ukraine, the remainder
        of Volhynia, and the Duchy of Courland in the Third Partition.
        Warsaw and the surrounding area was under Prussian rule until 1815,
        when the Congress Kingdom of Poland comes into being under Russian
        rule. The former provinces of Grodno, Kalicz, Kielce, Lublin, Lodz,
        Lomza,Plock, Radom, Siedlce, and Suwalki were among those areas
        annexed
        by the Russian Government.

        Austrian-Poland
        (18 % territory 32 % population)

        By the First Partition ( 1792) of Poland, Austria had obtained Galicia
        (consisting of Red Russia, the city of Lemberg [Lwów], a part of
        western Podolia, and southern Little Poland).
        Austria did not take any Polish land in the Second Partition.
        During the Third Partition (1795) of Poland, Austria took the
        remainder of Little Poland and Kraków.

        The southern Polish territories around Kraków and Lwów were
        incorporated into the Austrian Empire and renamed "Galicia".

        Galicia was formerly a Austrian Kronland and part of Austro-Hungarian
        Monarchy(1867-1918). Sometimes referred to as Austrian Poland.
        Other names for the area were Galicja (Polish), Galizien (German),
        Halychyna (Ukrainian) and Rus Halicka (Polish).

        In 1918, Galicia was annexed to Poland as "Malopolska" (Little
        Poland).
        After the 1939 partition of Poland by Germany and Russia, East Galicia
        became part of Ukraine while West Galicia remained in Poland.
        Its former territories are now shared between southern Poland and
        western Ukraine.


        Frank K

        Happy New Year
        (Slovak) S^t'astný Nový Rok
        (Czech) S^tastný Nový Rok
        (Polish) Szczes'liwego Nowego Roku
        (German) Ein Fröhes Neues Jahr
        (Hungarian) Boldog Újévet
      • Gil K.
        Frank, Thanks for the excellent summary on the Polish situation. Happy New Year Gil K. ... ED, Lapse Nizne is located 200 miles south of Warzsawa, Poland.
        Message 3 of 4 , Jan 2, 2005
        • 0 Attachment
          Frank,

          Thanks for the excellent summary on the Polish situation.

          Happy New Year

          Gil K.


          Frank <frankur@...> wrote:

          --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "big_ed321" <e_hornick@e...>
          wrote:
          >
          > Happy NEW YEAR EVERYONE
          >
          > I think I found my Grand fathers town it is either DURSZTYN or
          > FALSZTYN
          > The towns circling them are CZORSZTYNSKIE , NIEDZICA, LAPSZE NIZNE
          > TRYBSZ and KREMPACHY
          > I found these towns on a 2004 travel road map of POLAND
          > I tried to get more detail maps from travel agenties but no luck
          > ( mountains ,churches, mines ect)
          > My grandfather is JOSEPH HORNICK (HORNIK) landed in USA in 1893
          > I have tried to Email some HORNIK people but they do not go thru
          > I hope that everyone can help me like they have in the past?
          > Thanks ED

          ED,

          Lapse Nizne is located 200 miles south of Warzsawa, Poland.
          Krempachy is located 197 miles south of Warszawa.
          Falsztyn is located 5 miles distant from Krempachy and
          Dursztyn is located 3 miles distant from Krempachy.

          Your towns are located in SE Poland in former Galicia across from the
          Slovakia border and about 11 miles distant from your Matias^ovce (Sk)
          Szepesm�ty�sfalva (H) as the vrana (crow) flies.


          Hungarian English Polish grammatical form
          kis little mal~a/mal~e/mal~y
          nagy large wielka/wielke/wielki
          felso" upper g�rna/g�rne/g�rny
          als� lower dolna/dolne/dolny
          felso" upper wyzna,wyzne,wyzny
          als� lower nizna,nizne,nizny

          Hungarian English Slovak grammatical form
          kis little mal�/mal�/maly'
          nagy large vel'k�/vel'k�/vel'ky'
          felso" upper horn�/horn�/horny'
          als� lower doln�/doln�/dolny'
          felso" upper vys^n�/vys^n�/vys^ny'
          als� lower niz^n�/niz^n�/niz^ny'

          >From the late 1700s until the end of WW I, Poland did not exist as a
          country. It was divided among the Russian, German (Prussian), and
          Austrian Empires. These divisions were known as Partitions.
          When Poland was restored as a country after WWI, only certain portions
          of these partitioned areas were used to construct the present day
          Poland.
          The other portion of these areas were retained by the respective
          ruling government. There was German-Poland, Russian-Poland, and
          Austrian-Poland.

          German-Poland
          (20 % territory 23 % population)

          Prussia acquired the western regions of Poland especially
          those, which were later renamed West Prussia (formerly
          Royal Prussia) and the Province of Posen (the area around
          Poznan, called Wielkopolska, i.e. Greater Poland).
          West Prussia was known as Westpreussen (German) and Prusy
          Kr�lewskie (Polish).

          This area was also referred to as Silesia and Prussian-Poland.
          Prussia took parts of Great Poland in the First Partition of Poland in
          1772.
          In the Second Partition in 1793, Prussia seized Danzig (Gdansk), Thorn
          (Torun),
          and Great Poland, as well as a part of Mazovia.
          Prussia took the remainder of Mazovia, including Warsaw, in the
          Third Partition.

          Russian-Poland
          (62 % territory 45 % population)

          Russia had obtained White Russia and Latvian Lithuania to the Dnieper
          and Dvina rivers in the First Partition of Poland.
          In the Second Partition, Russia took most of the western Ukraine,
          including Podolia and a part of Volhynia, and all of the eastern part
          of Lithuania, also obtaining the right to move its troops into what
          remained of Poland and control its foreign policy.
          Russia acquired the rest of Lithuania and the Ukraine, the remainder
          of Volhynia, and the Duchy of Courland in the Third Partition.
          Warsaw and the surrounding area was under Prussian rule until 1815,
          when the Congress Kingdom of Poland comes into being under Russian
          rule. The former provinces of Grodno, Kalicz, Kielce, Lublin, Lodz,
          Lomza,Plock, Radom, Siedlce, and Suwalki were among those areas
          annexed
          by the Russian Government.

          Austrian-Poland
          (18 % territory 32 % population)

          By the First Partition ( 1792) of Poland, Austria had obtained Galicia
          (consisting of Red Russia, the city of Lemberg [Lw�w], a part of
          western Podolia, and southern Little Poland).
          Austria did not take any Polish land in the Second Partition.
          During the Third Partition (1795) of Poland, Austria took the
          remainder of Little Poland and Krak�w.

          The southern Polish territories around Krak�w and Lw�w were
          incorporated into the Austrian Empire and renamed "Galicia".

          Galicia was formerly a Austrian Kronland and part of Austro-Hungarian
          Monarchy(1867-1918). Sometimes referred to as Austrian Poland.
          Other names for the area were Galicja (Polish), Galizien (German),
          Halychyna (Ukrainian) and Rus Halicka (Polish).

          In 1918, Galicia was annexed to Poland as "Malopolska" (Little
          Poland).
          After the 1939 partition of Poland by Germany and Russia, East Galicia
          became part of Ukraine while West Galicia remained in Poland.
          Its former territories are now shared between southern Poland and
          western Ukraine.


          Frank K

          Happy New Year
          (Slovak) S^t'astn� Nov� Rok
          (Czech) S^tastn� Nov� Rok
          (Polish) Szczes'liwego Nowego Roku
          (German) Ein Fr�hes Neues Jahr
          (Hungarian) Boldog �j�vet





          To unsubscribe from this group, go to http://www.yahoogroups.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS -or- send blank email to SLOVAK-ROOTS-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com



          ---------------------------------
          Yahoo! Groups Links

          To visit your group on the web, go to:
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS/

          To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
          SLOVAK-ROOTS-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

          Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.



          ---------------------------------
          Do you Yahoo!?
          The all-new My Yahoo! � Get yours free!

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • jahornick
          Ed, My grandfather, John Hornick (born 1863), left Krynica (about 35 mi. east of Falsztyn and 40 mi. east of Dursztyn) for the US in 1882. I have no idea who
          Message 4 of 4 , Jul 9, 2008
          • 0 Attachment
            Ed,
            My grandfather, John Hornick (born 1863), left Krynica (about 35
            mi. east of Falsztyn and 40 mi. east of Dursztyn) for the US in
            1882. I have no idea who his parents or siblings were except that he
            had half-brothers. If you think this is an avenue for us to persue,
            please let me know.
            John

            --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "Frank" <frankur@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            > --- In SLOVAK-ROOTS@yahoogroups.com, "big_ed321" <e_hornick@e...>
            > wrote:
            > >
            > > Happy NEW YEAR EVERYONE
            > >
            > > I think I found my Grand fathers town it is either DURSZTYN or
            > > FALSZTYN
            > > The towns circling them are CZORSZTYNSKIE , NIEDZICA, LAPSZE NIZNE
            > > TRYBSZ and KREMPACHY
            > > I found these towns on a 2004 travel road map of POLAND
            > > I tried to get more detail maps from travel agenties but no luck
            > > ( mountains ,churches, mines ect)
            > > My grandfather is JOSEPH HORNICK (HORNIK) landed in USA in 1893
            > > I have tried to Email some HORNIK people but they do not go thru
            > > I hope that everyone can help me like they have in the past?
            > > Thanks ED
            >
            > ED,
            >
            > Lapse Nizne is located 200 miles south of Warzsawa, Poland.
            > Krempachy is located 197 miles south of Warszawa.
            > Falsztyn is located 5 miles distant from Krempachy and
            > Dursztyn is located 3 miles distant from Krempachy.
            >
            > Your towns are located in SE Poland in former Galicia across from
            the
            > Slovakia border and about 11 miles distant from your Matias^ovce
            (Sk)
            > Szepesmátyásfalva (H) as the vrana (crow) flies.
            >
            >
            > Hungarian English Polish grammatical form
            > kis little mal~a/mal~e/mal~y
            > nagy large wielka/wielke/wielki
            > felso" upper górna/górne/górny
            > alsó lower dolna/dolne/dolny
            > felso" upper wyzna,wyzne,wyzny
            > alsó lower nizna,nizne,nizny
            >
            > Hungarian English Slovak grammatical form
            > kis little malá/malé/maly'
            > nagy large vel'ká/vel'ké/vel'ky'
            > felso" upper horná/horné/horny'
            > alsó lower dolná/dolné/dolny'
            > felso" upper vys^ná/vys^né/vys^ny'
            > alsó lower niz^ná/niz^né/niz^ny'
            >
            > >From the late 1700s until the end of WW I, Poland did not exist as
            a
            > country. It was divided among the Russian, German (Prussian), and
            > Austrian Empires. These divisions were known as Partitions.
            > When Poland was restored as a country after WWI, only certain
            portions
            > of these partitioned areas were used to construct the present day
            > Poland.
            > The other portion of these areas were retained by the respective
            > ruling government. There was German-Poland, Russian-Poland, and
            > Austrian-Poland.
            >
            > German-Poland
            > (20 % territory 23 % population)
            >
            > Prussia acquired the western regions of Poland especially
            > those, which were later renamed West Prussia (formerly
            > Royal Prussia) and the Province of Posen (the area around
            > Poznan, called Wielkopolska, i.e. Greater Poland).
            > West Prussia was known as Westpreussen (German) and Prusy
            > Królewskie (Polish).
            >
            > This area was also referred to as Silesia and Prussian-Poland.
            > Prussia took parts of Great Poland in the First Partition of Poland
            in
            > 1772.
            > In the Second Partition in 1793, Prussia seized Danzig (Gdansk),
            Thorn
            > (Torun),
            > and Great Poland, as well as a part of Mazovia.
            > Prussia took the remainder of Mazovia, including Warsaw, in the
            > Third Partition.
            >
            > Russian-Poland
            > (62 % territory 45 % population)
            >
            > Russia had obtained White Russia and Latvian Lithuania to the
            Dnieper
            > and Dvina rivers in the First Partition of Poland.
            > In the Second Partition, Russia took most of the western Ukraine,
            > including Podolia and a part of Volhynia, and all of the eastern
            part
            > of Lithuania, also obtaining the right to move its troops into what
            > remained of Poland and control its foreign policy.
            > Russia acquired the rest of Lithuania and the Ukraine, the remainder
            > of Volhynia, and the Duchy of Courland in the Third Partition.
            > Warsaw and the surrounding area was under Prussian rule until 1815,
            > when the Congress Kingdom of Poland comes into being under Russian
            > rule. The former provinces of Grodno, Kalicz, Kielce, Lublin, Lodz,
            > Lomza,Plock, Radom, Siedlce, and Suwalki were among those areas
            > annexed
            > by the Russian Government.
            >
            > Austrian-Poland
            > (18 % territory 32 % population)
            >
            > By the First Partition ( 1792) of Poland, Austria had obtained
            Galicia
            > (consisting of Red Russia, the city of Lemberg [Lwów], a part of
            > western Podolia, and southern Little Poland).
            > Austria did not take any Polish land in the Second Partition.
            > During the Third Partition (1795) of Poland, Austria took the
            > remainder of Little Poland and Kraków.
            >
            > The southern Polish territories around Kraków and Lwów were
            > incorporated into the Austrian Empire and renamed "Galicia".
            >
            > Galicia was formerly a Austrian Kronland and part of Austro-
            Hungarian
            > Monarchy(1867-1918). Sometimes referred to as Austrian Poland.
            > Other names for the area were Galicja (Polish), Galizien (German),
            > Halychyna (Ukrainian) and Rus Halicka (Polish).
            >
            > In 1918, Galicia was annexed to Poland as "Malopolska" (Little
            > Poland).
            > After the 1939 partition of Poland by Germany and Russia, East
            Galicia
            > became part of Ukraine while West Galicia remained in Poland.
            > Its former territories are now shared between southern Poland and
            > western Ukraine.
            >
            >
            > Frank K
            >
            > Happy New Year
            > (Slovak) S^t'astný Nový Rok
            > (Czech) S^tastný Nový Rok
            > (Polish) Szczes'liwego Nowego Roku
            > (German) Ein Fröhes Neues Jahr
            > (Hungarian) Boldog Újévet
            >
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.